33

Most PhD programs that I am aware of have "residency requirements"—that is, you must be registered at the university and in general physically present in the department for some period of time. However, most PhD advisors that I am aware of in disciplines in which people can "work remotely" do allow their students to "telecommute" if necessary. For instance, ...


26

There are a number of issues here: The new university probably isn't accredited (yet?) and is for-profit (at least that's how I interpret "this does not mean it is non-profit"). In principle a for-profit, unaccredited university could be innovative and wonderful, but it will face a lot of prejudice because most such universities are not. Joining a new ...


18

No. In the US, permanent university-level teaching positions in computer science, even at small four-year colleges, require a Ph.D. As I explained in my earlier answer, an online master's degree will not help you get into a PhD program. For some non-tenure-track positions, a master's degree with a thesis may be enough, but a terminal/professional/course-...


17

First of all, what I'm about to say may vary depending on the field. I'm in mathematics. The role of the recommendation letters is for someone who can be seen as an authority to tell the admissions committee how well you will do in academia. Someone from outside academia is unlikely to be able to tell them that. You need at least one recommendation letter ...


17

You mentioned that the college is accredited. You might want to contact the accrediting body (it's usually regional, like SACS and NEACS) and alert them to what's going on here. I'm very sorry to hear you're having such a poor experience with this distance learning program. It's possible that it's vastly inferior to the school's on-site program, although ...


17

It is possible to purse an online PhD in mathematics? Highly doubtful. A PhD is not course-based, like an undergraduate degree. You can't just "do" a PhD, as in finish the given classes and work and call yourself done. You need to do research, both independently, and in collaboration with your supervisor. You're not learning things that are known, but ...


13

Different requests warrant different communication styles. By simply sending an email and leaving it at that, your request is in the same boat as any other piece of spam they receive; unsolicited mail asking for their resources (time, money, whatever). If you truly wish to have them partner with you in a new business venture, you should engage in standard ...


13

I have an MA in religious studies, so maybe I can offer a bit of humanities insight here. The main question you should be asking yourself is, what will I be doing with this degree? If you are hoping to be recognized as an expert within your Christian denomination, and if this Missouri institution is recognized in your faith community as a prestigious one, ...


11

PhD programs of any worth in the United States require three letters of reference from faculty who can attest to your academic qualifications - and who have met you in person. MA programs (especially unfunded ones) are much more lenient and will take students who are borderline. I'd recommend looking into a physical (not online) MA where you can work ...


11

If you're dissatisfied, the easiest approach is to vote with your feet and wallet and leave. Your best bet would be to transfer to a proper, accredited program ASAP. Don't throw good time after bad time. For an accredited program, it's hard to believe that all of their instruction material is made in-house. This is not the norm. From an accreditation ...


11

tl;dr Get a MSc from a top Israeli university first. It will practically ensure that you will get accepted to just about any PhD program that you want to. And a math MSc from a top Israeli uni is a pretty good thing to have. (edit see below) I'm an Israeli currently studying outside of Israel, so I might give you a more relevant perspective on the issue. ...


10

In my opinion, Georgia Tech's Online Master of Computer Science will not help you get a computer science PhD in the US. Not because it's online, but because it's a professional master's program. There are two types of master's degrees in computer science in the US: Thesis (aka research) masters degrees have a significant research component, in close ...


10

No, computer science is much more than just programming. That's what makes it science. Introductory CS course tend to focus on programming, but as you get deeper into the subject programming becomes less central. Thus many (maybe even most) graduate-level CS courses at top universities do not involve programming at all. (Of course, graduate courses on ...


8

I did my PhD as a part-time external student from a reputable university. I am unsure if this is any different from an online mode because I did not have to be physically present on the campus. Additionally, I mostly communicated with my supervisor via email. This arrangement worked well for me because I did not want to resign from my job and also the ...


8

Whether an online degree program can give you what you need depends strongly on how you want to use it. A university degree can typically provide three key assets: Skills: the technical foundations for professional success, particularly in STEM fields like computer science. Network: connections with fellow students in your cohort are an excellent way to ...


8

The appropriate place to raise this would be through the Disabled Student Services at your university. Even though you're taking the course as a MOOC, the DSS office still has authority over the course (unless it's being run through a subsidiary or joint-venture similar to Ed-X) as well as the responsibility to make it accessible. C.F. Harvard and Ed-X ...


7

Whatever you do, it's worth keeping in mind that those reading through grad school applications are people as well. They understand that whatever happened 20 years ago will not be who you are today. So, if you have good grades in your most recent courses, and if you have good GRE scores, then they will be quite likely to disregard your grades from the last ...


7

No. Online MS degrees are necessarily course-based "professional" master's degrees, otherwise known as terminal master's degrees. If you want to apply to a PhD program, you need to provide strong evidence of research potential. If you are applying with an MS, you will be competing with applicants in research MS programs, who almost certainly have more ...


7

No, there's no legitimate way for you to get an online PhD in sociology (which is a social science, not humanities, but eh, lables are silly anyway), at least not with the profile you describe. You are also extremely unlikely to be considered for a normal sociology PhD programme. Speaking as a member of a sociology department, you quite simply do not have ...


6

For many years on-line (a/k/a, "distance learning") degrees have been offered by regionally accredited universities In the USA. Until a decade or so ago, most of the degrees were earned by schools that specialized in distance learning. Even graduates of schools that had physical campuses and regional accreditation who studied full-time on campus were ...


6

This my vary by school, but at least at my institution, this is close to the line where approval from higher-ups is required for a professor to participate. While professors have a great deal of latitude with how they use their time, the university does actually claim possession of our teaching (it is, after all, what they're paying us for). There are ...


6

YES! If you google "phd by published work" or "PhD by publications", you will find many universities offering such a way of graduating. Basically, you do your research with no time pressure, with or without colleagues, with or without a mentor (it is better to have a mentor though and colleagues are fun!). You publish your work in scientific journals or ...


5

Yes, you can get a PhD online from a reputable university. I think that most universities would waive nearly all "residency" type requirements when presented with a body of completed research that well surpasses the minimum requirements for a PhD and a sum of money. I would guess that proving the Riemann hypothesis and donating a building would get you a PhD ...


5

Probably not. Most teaching jobs require a PhD, and those that don't tend to be reserved for PhD students (my freshman and sophomore English classed were taught by PhD students, quite well, I might add). After many years of established practice as a computing professional, you might find yourself able to apply to teach at a community college in your area (if ...


5

It's definitely possible to get a PhD online from a reputable school. The University of Florida, the flagship school of the Florida university system, for example, offers a number of options. Nova Southeastern University, another reputable school, also offers multiple options. However, if you look closely at the degrees offered, I think you'll find that ...


4

Unfortunately I seem to agree with JeffE. It does sound like a scam. The open universities I know: a) They have permanent administrative personnel organizing the university tasks b) Despite the fact they are online they have buildings (not necessarily a campus) but at least offices where the administrative people work. c) They have deans, professors and ...


4

First, @scaaahu correctly observed some formal complications: e.g., looking at that web page, it seems that the closest thing to a degree in mathematics is a baccalaureate in "arts, letters, and science". It is important not to be even inadvertently inaccurate about your degree. But, apart from that, the issue I'd anticipate in your situation is not the ...


4

At the risk of sounding obvious let me share some advice that will not be specific to OU. First, wherever you are, you can do research on your own, although it's usually a tough call while being at the undergraduate level. A somewhat more realistic option could be locating and contacting the academics in your field at a university reasonably close to your ...


4

I doubt there's a wholly satisfying solution here. Of the options you've listed, #4 is probably the one that is most likely to be viable, but the problem there is that everybody's grades would need to be adjusted if a question is eliminated because it's wrong. However, it will be very difficult to convince the instructor—who presumably set the exam in the ...


4

My advice would be to go to the website of the university you are thinking about enrolling in, find out who the course coordinator is, and email them about your situation. Explain that you are willing to put in the effort to get your knowledge up to an acceptable level. You may find that they can offer you a bridging course, or suggest having sessions with ...


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