34

There are two different questions in here that are mixed up: one about whether the Dutch and English exams should be identical and one about exam quality. Regarding the first question: I fail to see why this should be unethical. On the contrary: It seems very good that the standards on what you are supposed to know are the same. After all, you get the same ...


23

I wanted to add an answer that concentrates more specifically on the issues of fairness and ethics. Along with some (but not all) of the commenters, I don't think it is a good idea to characterize a poorly written exam as an ethical problem (without further information; it is a strange feature of ethical problems that almost anything could become an ethical ...


22

You can expect rather more than that. 10/0 corresponds to a second year PhD student (functieschaal P). A postdoc typically goes on somewhere around 10-5, plus a point per year. So you might hope to be somewhere around 10-8. To get your annual salary, multiply these numbers by 14: 12 months plus two bonus payments. Don't ask me why. Coming from abroad you ...


16

Using the term "postdoc" may cause confusion, because to me a postdoc is by definition an early-career researcher hired for a limited period. But the question as I understand it has nothing specifically to do with the terminology. It amounts to why universities don't offer long-term contracts conditionally on maintaining adequate external funding, but ...


14

PS. I have only been part of the Dutch system for the first 8 years, but I know it pretty well as I know a lot of Dutch people, still I might have made mistakes. If so: apologies.


12

There's isn't that much room for negotiation in general, since all these university-related things are fixed by law. You've already found the CAO tables which determine salary. Depending on how badly they want you over there, a PI might be able to get you entered in a higher 'trede' (10-x), or even a higher 'schaal' (x-1). I would say it's nearly impossible ...


12

This is an unfortunate situation were nobody really is to blame. You can't expect the university to warn you about a law that wasn't even in place yet, and the university cannot objectively be mad at you for reneging when your contractual situation significantly changed, even if it is due to outside factors. Of course the important word in the above ...


10

Giving course notes is probably ok, if you are happy to provide them as a one-off. If becomes a regular occurrence and the person has no very good reason to not take their own notes (disability or serious family constraints), I think it is perfectly reasonable not to be "their mule". Once is fine, twice is perhaps ok, three times is being exploited. You ...


9

This answer is from a mostly German perspective, but I guess parts of it would apply to other countries with similar labour laws. The key problem is who to "let go" when funding is short. Are you always going to fire the person that happened to work on the most recently finished project if there is no new funding coming in around that time? Well, according ...


9

The propaedeutic diploma is awarded after completing all the requirements for the first year of studies. Not all universities in the Netherlands award it, and its importance seems to be less since Bologna has introduced the bachelor/master system in the Netherlands. Before it was the only diploma/certificate until completing the full four or five years for a ...


8

First of all, I'm afraid that there is no legal wrongdoing on your schools end, although I think that you are feeling very betrayed and having received a great injustice. (But I'm not a lawyer, although I think this isn't the path you should try. The Netherlands doesn't have a big 'suing culture' and trying immediately this might make more people hostile ...


7

The exact regulations differ per country, but prospective studies with human subjects almost always need approval. Since you tagged your question with "Netherlands", the relevant law is the WMO = "Wet medisch-wetenschappelijk onderzoek met mensen". Any research that falls under this law requires approval. Research falls under the WMO if the following ...


7

While there are probably nuances to the situation, this sounds a lot like the tax laws have changed resulting in you having a much higher tax liability. Maybe the university will be nice and offer everyone a raise to account for the change in the tax law, but most likely (at least in the US), the university is not particularly worried about your take home ...


7

I've seen such grading used for true-false and multiple-choice questions in an exam, where a right answer gained you points and a wrong answer cost you points, but I've never heard of a problem worth "nothing" that cost you points if you got it wrong. Personally, I dislike such systems—I'd rather give credit than subtract for mistakes—but instructors often ...


6

All of the universities you have mentioned are top-league universities with high prestige. As for whether you have a better chance of getting into Durham, UCL etc versus Oxford is debatable. They are internationally renowned and the competition very high. Of course, Oxford is Oxford, but there's little point in going to Oxford just because it's Oxford, which ...


6

There is a difference between supervisor and promotor. You need a promotor, who is going to sign off your thesis. This needs to be a full professor (not associate or assistant). However, your main supervisor can be any PI (comparable to assistant/associate professor). Your daily supervision can even be handled by postdocs, and to some extend even by senior ...


6

I think (in both the UK and in NL) this is very much down to the personality and management style of whoever is responsible for supervising you and signing off on your expenses. On the whole I would say that attitudes in NL are similar to those in the UK, and provided you don't give anyone cause for concern you'll be left to your own devices. That said, ...


5

Nobody will care how many Ph.D. do you have when they consider you for a tenure track position. What will matter is number and quality of your papers/conference presentations after your PhD. If you want to change a field of your studies then it makes sense to do a second PhD. But if not, then it is a waste of time. It makes sense to delay your PhD defence ...


5

Legally, as far as I understand, it is not possible to negotiate new terms that contradict the terms of the applicable collective labour agreements in the Netherlands. Many labour agreements however leave some room for negotiation, see e.g. Appendix 3 in the file you linked. In practice however there I would not expect there to be much room. As for your ...


5

This is indeed related to customs in Dutch academia. Precise practice and regulations vary between universities, but usually there is the opportunity (or even duty) to provide this list of propositions, usually distributed as an inserted leaflet with the thesis. The propositions themselves vary from serious scientific statements (typically related to the ...


5

Send him a short email reminding him who you are amd ask if he is planning on taking a PhD student soon. Let the conversation develop from there.


5

You automatically go up one step per year, until you reach the top of the scale. Starting points are determined by HR, based on an estimate of how many 'years' into the scale you already should be. For example, a postdoc would typically begin on (I think) 10-4, to account for the time spent doing the PhD (note that the Promovendus - PhD student - scale P ...


4

Looking at the collective employment agreement briefly, I'd say that pretty much everything is prescribed, and that only the things in Appendix 3 are negotiable. That is to say, you can negotiate about some things in the amount of gross salary and the amount of vacation. These are options for, it appears, trading salary/vacation for help with commuting costs,...


4

I'm Dutch and did my bachelor/master and PhD studies at a Dutch university (Utrecht), but can't claim to know exactly what they want; for that you'd really need to get in contact with the people at the university who are in charge of the admission procedure. That said, I think they want an official confirmation that you passed all requirements necessary to ...


4

"Docent" or "D" or "gepromoveerd docent" is a teaching-only position (or with a minimum amount of research time, like 20%), while a "Universitair Docent" or "UD" is someone who has much more research time (e.g., 40%). Also, there are much more tenured UD's ("UD met een vast contract") than tenured D's. After I finished my PhD, I was docent for a year (...


4

Both type of universities are research intensive, so the adjective "research" is not useful to distinguish them. In the Netherlands they are usually called "classical" and "technical" universities, which is the terminology I will use here. In general the distinction is that the universities of technology are more application-oriented, while the other ...


4

Regarding the general employment laws, there is usually a catch with the "let go if you run out of money". Once you trigger that process, the law puts limitations on how you can hire in the future. For example, in Finland, if you lay off someone because you want to discontinue that role in the company, you are not allowed to employ anyone for the same or ...


4

Because they can. It isn't that companies are less reluctant than universities to offer permanent positions; universities -- at least in many European countries -- are in a better position legally to use fixed-term contracts. Universities' interests as employers are not so different from companies. They like flexibility. More and more, university research ...


4

The key point is whether the poor quality of the exams affected the marks. If translation was poor but students could understand all questions - even with help of professors or assistants present at the exam - bad translation is just an small problem of lack of professionalism that should be fixed before next exam. However, if bad translation prevented ...


4

It is true that in the Netherlands they prefer it if you have a masters. However, some people have been admitted and completed PhD programs without one. I am one of those people, and I had less industry experience than yourself. I think your chances are good, and your CV sounds better than many people with a masters. But it will depend on your potential ...


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