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141

As an outsider this seems ridiculous. I think a quick email to the chair of the department saying that you have an advisee who is worried about BIO302 (or whatever the number is) and the running component. It seems reasonable to ask if that is actually a requirement (which it clearly is, but the department chair may not know it) and if it is, what course ...


104

If the class is about microbiology, the students’ grade should depend on their knowledge of microbiology, and only on that. (Edit: to clarify, “knowledge” covers things like lab skills and other things that have a connection to microbiology but aren’t strictly theoretical in nature. But not running. Definitely not running.) I’ll assume based on OP’s ...


72

The student's health status or physique is not of consideration here. If the situation is as the student described, the prof's behavior is simply untenable -- if for no other reason than 25% of contact hours being spent on nonsense. Every student in the class should be incensed. The TAs should be upset that they're spending their time this way. The ...


49

You can't immediately tell from the title, but then titles are not typically used by an individual to broadcast their occupation - we don't have variants of "Mr" for plumbers, bank managers, or rock stars - despite their very different occupations. Rather, the title is to be used by others when addressing that individual, in order to signify a degree of ...


34

You can't. That's why there are numerous jokes in English-speaking culture about whether someone addressed as "doctor" is a "real" doctor or not. Medical doctors are supposed to be the "real" ones in the jokes.


16

I agree with the other answers that you should e-mail the department chair. Additionally, I would suggest that you advise the student that he has options to solve this himself even without your intervention. You are his advisor, so advise him, don't just try to solve it for him. E.g. your university may have an Ombudsman, suggest that he talk to them. The ...


15

Are there examples of conference proceedings that have a formal IF figure computed? There is nothing like the "formal IF". What you are referring to is probably the Thomson Reuter's Journal Citation Reports impact factor which is one of the most respected measures in the academic world. As such, to my best knowledge there is no such thing for conferences. ...


14

In the United States, in spoken address, both are called "doctor." For personal correspondence, both are addressed as "Dr." as with an invitation addressed to "Dr. and Mrs. Smith." (Or maybe "Dr. and Mr. Smith." If they both hold doctorates, it is "Drs. Smith." For a couple with different family names, use "Dr. Smith and Mr. Brown.") For professional ...


13

Under Title IX, it's illegal for universities receiving federal funding to disadvantage students due to pregnancy. The Department of Education specifically calls out more frequent bathroom breaks as an adjustment that educators must provide to pregnant students. your school MUST: Allow you to continue participating in classes and extracurricular ...


13

In the US, being 28, 30, or even 40 is not a problem for getting into med school. I was 26 when I was admitted, and I was far from the oldest in my class. In fact, by my senior year, they had admitted a couple of students older than my current age at the time! If you haven't been slacking off in between college and now, it could make you even more ...


12

You are his adviser. Don't cover this up, or let it go. Advise your student to go get a doctor's note which states s/he needs a reasonable accommodation under the American Disabilities Act allowing the student any number of attempts to complete each mile, two hours to perform each mile (not the ~15 minutes provided), that s/he is not required to do it ...


10

As a person who faced a similar dilemma a few years ago, I think there are major practical differences: The working environment. Every doctor will spend his early career in a hospital, whether he plans on practising in the community later or not. A hospital environment is really different than the research one. In the former you are constantly on your feet, ...


10

I have no idea how you'd find hard data on the program itself and its results, but as an idle musing I checked how many full time faculty members in the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health's Dept. of Epidemiology held an MD/PhD or DrPH. The department was chosen as a very good department in a very good school with a strong medical school that I'm not ...


10

In Switzerland, access to medicine, dentistry and veterinary is limited due to high demand (also for Swiss students). The test for admission is called Numerus clauses and it was introduced because the capacity of the universities are too low and demand too high. Basically they are allowed to test students if demand is more than 20% above capacity. ...


9

I have seen the difference in the written form of their name; One is Name Family, PhD. and other one is Name Family MD. The same applies to the people holding Engineering doctorates such as Name Family, EngD. or holding doctorate in business such as DBA. Also, in different countries there are usually different doctorate titles (link) awarded. But all of ...


9

You call him "Doctor Surname" unless you are sufficiently well-acquainted to call him by his given name. (I worked with someone with a DScN degree and she was called "Doctor Smith" by the physicians in committee meetings, etc.) If you and this person will be working with patients, ask "How should I address you when there are patients present?" before the ...


8

There are two main tracks of medicine: clinical (the "standard" medical practice), and research. Typically, doctors who work in the latter tend to pursue combined MD-PhD programs, and consequently have degrees in both a traditional scientific research discipline as well as medicine. It probably was easier in the past to make such a switch with "just" a ...


8

I'm a student enrolled in a MD/PhD program in Canada. I don't know about NIH very well, but our experience here is that it is very difficult to continue research. I agree with eykanal: it takes a lot to be a great clinician (and being a mediocre clinician is very hard on one's conscience). 50%+ of students rethink their decision during their first year of ...


8

To elaborate on the answer by ddiez: bioRxiv has been deliberately designed to fill the same sort of role for life sciences that arXiv does for physics, math, and computer science. A key reason for this is the growing recognition amongst some practitioners in these fields that scientific communication is being inhibited by the long time to publication and ...


8

From the Lancet: Acknowledgments — written consent of cited individual From CMJA: Authors should specify, in the acknowledgements section, contributions to the paper that should be recognized but do not justify authorship, for example critical review of the study proposal or assistance with statistical analysis. The Canadian Medical Association ...


8

The BMJ Publishing Group suggests a very simple reason for the change: We no longer publish pictures with black bands across the eyes because bands fail to mask someone’s identity effectively. We will need the patient to sign our consent form, which requires the patient to have read the article. If you can "blacken out" the face, then why not just ...


8

As some answers have suggested, check the syllabus, if running or "minimum physical requirement" is not in there, your student wins. On the moral side I can see some "intention" in there, although, don't get me wrong, this is completely denigrating, discriminative and can even be considered as bullying someone. If the professor has this "idea" of making ...


7

I think your question is perhaps ambiguous (does "typical length of time" mean hours you put in, or days/months from the start of the project?), and not really answerable regardless of the interpretation. There are different kinds of undergraduate research. Here are a couple of the usual ways undergrad research is done: A somewhat intensive short period of ...


7

If you're in the US, make sure the data set complies to HIPAA. Double check to make sure you don't have any information that would allow identification. Another one measure that HIPAA may not touch on is the rarity of the medical outcome(s) in your data set. Participants in a flu data set are a lot harder to identify that participants in, say, an anthrax ...


7

The exact regulations differ per country, but prospective studies with human subjects almost always need approval. Since you tagged your question with "Netherlands", the relevant law is the WMO = "Wet medisch-wetenschappelijk onderzoek met mensen". Any research that falls under this law requires approval. Research falls under the WMO if the following ...


7

Students are not generally employees in the US so comparing the laws that govern a workplace (OSHA and labor laws) is not really relevant. That said, treating your students nicely, even if it is not legally required is still a good thing. Scheduling students in back-to-back-to-back ... classes is stupid and serves no point but to abuse students. It is ...


6

This may have changed but we studied cartels in college and the American Medical Association (AMA) was called a cartel by my professor. In the US the AMA not only sanctions the medical schools but puts a count on how many students can be accepted. Since there are a limited number of slots competition is more fierce. There is no external body limiting ...


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