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46

Can anyone publish my paper in a journal or conference? They'd need to attribute the paper to you. Most journals will only accept papers written by the person who is submitting the paper. Can a journal publish my paper on its own? Yes. You already gave permission to do so. A legitimate journal probably won't do so. Possibly a predatory journal might do ...


18

The license mainly affects legal rights, not academic ethics. Codes and conventions of academic ethics provide (generally) clear guidelines on who can submit papers for publication, what authorship attribution is required, and so on. Reputable journals have their own submission policies that confirm this; a typical policy might say that the submission must ...


17

Anybody attempting to publish your paper under their name would be committing plagiarism and breaking the license agreement. Anybody submitting your paper under your name would be committing some sort of misconduct, and possibly worse if they sign paperwork. No serious journal or conference would want to deal with either scenario, so I wouldn't worry about ...


9

For an author writing a paper, the answer would be no. The author isn't exploiting the software for commercial use, but for scientific/academic work. The author that uses the software isn't selling anything, nor profiting from it monetarily. However, if a traditional journal were to take the same software and use it to prepare figures for authors (or covers ...


7

Is there something that prevents publishers from offering open-accessification of existing articles? No, there isn't. The current license for the published manuscript is the result of a contract between the authors and the publisher. This means creating a new/additional license is possible if both the authors and the publisher agree. (You need agreement ...


7

Can anyone publish my paper in a journal or conference? As mentioned in the other answers, they could, with attribution. But they probably will not because it is not profitable. Is there any way for changing the license? As mentioned in the other answers, no, the license cannot be revoked. Would you please guide me on how bad is the situation for me? ...


7

Most student licenses I know up limit usage to educational purposes. Using software under such licenses for the purpose you describe would be research usage or professional usage, and would not be allowed under such licenses, "commercial" or not. This will vary by license, though. Some are VERY specific about limiting the use to coursework, and ...


5

It depends on what you mean. If you're asking about using the ideas or methods in the paper, see this question and maybe also this question. In case you're asking about using the actual paper itself (i.e. text, figures etc.), the first step would be to check the abstract page for the preprint rather than the pdf. In this case, it would be https://arxiv.org/...


5

As Roland points out, licensing terms can, at least in principle, be renegotiated. I'm aware of one academic publisher that provides an option for this: Springer-Nature has (what appears to be a trial run for) a policy allowing retrospective open access in certain case: From January 2021, authors who published primary research articles in Nature or the ...


5

I will not repeat the points raised in other answers (I especially find Brian's answer excellent), though I will summarize: you cannot revoke an irrevocable licence; but no legitimate journal would let anyone get away with plagiarizing your article. However, there are at least two important points that were sometimes mentioned (e.g., by PLL), but deserve ...


5

The software developed by most academics has no commercial value. It is a research product, similar to a paper, and is usually shared with other researchers by hosting it on the researcher’s web page (as I do) or on GitHub or other repositories. There is usually no need for any sort of license, but some people will include a license to make clear what use by ...


4

The normal copyright laws apply. Old works don't have issues about reuse/republication, but should be cited to the author to avoid charges of plagiarism. Newer works need to observe that "complete" works can't normally be copied without permission. A poem, even if short, is a complete work. Quotations are probably fine if cited to the original ...


4

Any of the arXiv licenses can be chosen; they are all compatible with the above quoted terms of the IOP policy. From arXiv Submittal Agreement Terms and Conditions (revision 0.8.3): Management of Copyright This grant to arXiv is a non-exclusive license and is not a grant of exclusive rights or a transfer of the copyright. The authors retain their copyright ...


3

Get in Touch with Your University's Legal Counsel All of the other answers explain what would happen as a consequence of licensing a paper under a Creative Commons license, which is fair and certainly worth knowing. To me, though, this is a legal question, not an academic question. The question is, can you actually offer a work under a license ...


2

Yes, with reservations. [Gold open access articles] May be shared according to the author-selected end-user license and should contain a CrossMark logo, the end user license, and a DOI link to the formal publication on ScienceDirect.


2

(Disclaimer: IANAL. Well, in the UK, lawyer isn't a regulated profession, only solicitor and barrister are, so I can claim I'm a lawyer all I want.) Short answer: You can do whatever you want with later versions of the manuscript, but previous versions will stay with the licence you gave them. This is seen a lot with open-source computer programs. To change ...


2

Use the default license (the arxiv.org license). It's the most restrictive one they offer. The ieee page you link is exceedingly clear that posting on arxiv is allowed, with the only restriction that you have to update the arxiv with the DOI once published.


2

It's not an answer to your question but an idea: After review, you will likely make some corrections to your paper and publish version 2. Publish version 2 under a different license. In that way, anyone who wants to make use of your paper will probably prefer to use the revised version 2 which will be licensed less permissively.


2

If you publish something and don't give an explicit license (US, anyway), the default is "all rights reserved". You can provide the license elsewhere if you like, as long as you still hold copyright. But if you transfer copyright to someone else, and it doesn't already have an explicit license, then they own copyright and you can no longer provide ...


1

Patents and software licenses are completely different. Relatively little software is actually patented, and I'd suspect the university wants to be involved in any patent applications. University involvement in patents is also a way for a researcher to avoid the high cost of patenting anything (lawyers and such). Patents need to be registered. Copyrights don'...


1

I don't see anything special. A caption fitting the journal style but saying something like "taken from fig. 2e in ref #" seems perfect to me. You are not cropping the subfigure. But even in that case, and even if the figure would be data, you just add "spectrum, plot, whatever cropped" from.... Obviously what you let out should not ...


1

Image manipulation becomes problematic when one can judge them as fabrication (that is, the data visualised were actually never obtained through the methods you describe) or as falsification (whereby crucial information are lost) [1]. It follows that 'beautifying' an image to make them more reader-friendly (e.g. by changing colors) or to add valuable hints (...


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