5

Jumping in to a new sub field can be hard. The vocabulary is new and you don't yet have the insights of those with more experience. If you trust your advisor, you could just say what you say here, but ask for the important background papers (or books) that will help bring you up to speed quickly. This is what a colleague would do, so it isn't impossible ...


4

The lecture is a very inefficient method of training. Passive, linear, etc. Working problems, reading texts, doing examinations is much more active and time-efficient. If you really want to get max value out of a lecture, read the text ahead and work the exercises ahead. The lecture then is refresher and an alternate viewpoint. Your notes will only be ...


4

Documentation I don't have, but anecdotes, sure. Actually, I'd be surprised if what you describe as "backward learning" isn't pretty ubiquitous in mathematics for new researchers, say doctoral students. Another name for it might be "just in time" learning, or "just enough". Suppose a doctoral student is trying to get going on some problem suggested by an ...


2

Ethics aside, as many people have noted that the concerns that arise aren't strictly ethics-dependent, there are practical issues to address. Harvey Mudd College saw this in a big way in its CS courses, particularly the introductory sequence. Historically, they had a required intro programming course that first-term freshman took unless they placed out via ...


2

Yes, it's called "learning." Mathematics is highly atypical because we currently structure mathematical training as a pipeline as though this were the best or only way to go about it. (I would argue that it's not even a good way to go about it, and it certainly isn't true that it's necessary to have plodded through Hartshorne in order to begin reading papers ...


1

If you want the most fundamental skill, Math is surely the most fundamental as the other sciences are built on top of it to some degree. However, whether the math you learn will impact your future research is debatable. I had a friend with your passion for self study who went off the deep end for about a semester on Group Theory. To my knowledge he hasn't ...


1

To give an analogy from your own current field of ML/DL, this is the essence of transfer learning. You train a model (~learn particular background and acquire skills) for a certain task (~a certain field). You then use this learning to solve a related, but different task (~a related, possibly applied, but not wholly different field) without re-training your ...


1

In my honest opinion, this is more of a corollary to a fundamental systemic problem than an ethical one. The questions to be raised is why such students take those courses. There are few motivies I have personally witnessed. To get an easy grade The course is mandatory or a prerequisite with no way around it Students need to fit some numerical credit ...


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