45

Actually, there are no universal requirements for waiving testing. For instance, at MIT, you establish eligibility for a language waiver by attending primary and secondary schools that have English as the language of instruction or by attending an American university for your undergraduate education. At Yale, you must have attended an English-language ...


31

I am Latino, and as a result have an even worse version of this issue. My full name is of the form A B C D E, with A and B being given names, and C D and E being surnames. An extra complication is that D is not a name by itself, it's just a preposition. I have given the TOEFL and GRE tests before and that has not been an issue. Minor errors may occur ...


21

The answer is "sometimes." Some schools will not care what the score is, as long as you have the minimum requirement that they advertise publicly. Some schools won't care, even if you don't have the minimum requirement (they may "waive" this requirement routinely). Some schools will care: they may have one public requirement, and a higher (unpublicized) ...


17

Probably not. But there is really only one person that knows for sure: the professor in question. So, as Mark Meckes already mentioned in the comments, send them a message, explain that you forgot to remove the draft outline at the beginning of your essay and ask them to ignore that part, and to exclude it from the word count limit if applicable. Be aware ...


14

The truth of the matter is that while you may find many schools that do not require the GRE, virtually every US school is going to require either the TOEFL or a similar test such as the IELTS. The reason for this is that one of the important criteria for admission to most US graduate programs is the ability to do coursework and interact with fellow graduate ...


14

This may not be a direct answer to the question, but I think the fact that the question is asked reflects some basic misunderstanding of TOEFL and GRE. I want to point out the TOEFL and GRE are two completely different tests designed to assess different aspects of your language skill. TOEFL is a test for people whom English is not the first language, and ...


14

English competency is not a field in which you can earn "extra credit." While it is possible that a graduate program may be moderately impressed by your enthusiastic creation of study materials (but you can't count on this: as a data point, I had never heard of an "anki deck" until now), such activities certainly do not directly compensate for low TOEFL ...


13

It is possible. As an International student, I have taken TOEFL 4 times in one and a half year. Personally, I increased my score in every section at every exam. However, it does not suggest you will always improve your score. The reason is simple. Assume you do not spend time on learning English regularly between two exams. In fact, your score is a random ...


13

The problem is that many students will resort to cheating, if necessary, to secure admission to graduate school. Just about any method or loophole that can be exploited will be. For instance, when I was an undergraduate in the 90's, one of the graduate departments stopped admitting students from China for several years because they had multiple instances ...


13

Whether a department will read your file if the scores are low depends on the department. My department generally would, but others do not. While your work to help other students studying for the GRE is admirable, it will probably carry very little weight. Your weak English fluency is evident in the title and body of this question, and departments may ...


12

As in a comment by @GoodDeeds: in my U.S. R1 large state univ, my math dept has a cut-off of 23 for the spoken part of the TOEFL (=test of English as a foreign language), regardless of the rest of the application. Sometimes a 22 can make the cut, if faculty advocate for the applicant. Most of our grad students are supported as TAs (teaching assistants). ...


11

No, you don't need to take the SAT. The SAT is for students going into undergrad. Instead, you'll probably need to take the GRE, which is a similar exam for students going into grad school. Yes, you'll probably need to do the TOEFL, I'd guess. That seems like a common requirement for international students. Both of these requirements vary from ...


10

Every school words the requirements, if any, for the TOEFL a little differently. For example, Harvard GSAS: Applicants whose native language is other than English and who do not hold the equivalent of a US Bachelor's degree from an institution at which English is the language of instruction must submit scores from the Internet based test (IBT) of the Test ...


10

You should read the minimum requirements of the program at the university to which you are applying. Some universities only accept TOEFL, some other only accept IELTS, some universities accept both of these, and some universities accept those certificates like FCE, CAE or CPE as well as TOEFL or IELTS. (Some other universities also accept the English tests ...


10

The TOEFL and the GRE are quite different. The 'point' -- in as much as standardized tests have one -- of the TOEFL is to figure out if you have sufficient mastery of English to study (and potentially be a Teaching Assistant/Instructor) in an English-speaking environment. The TOEFL is generally required of all non-native English speakers. Graduate programs ...


10

In addition to other useful remarks made: in my university, a minimum TOEFL score is considered a problem, to the extent that it drags down everything of the file. Partly this is based on our past experiences with such scores (statistically, over 30+ years) and the subsequent improvements-or-not. Specifically, minimal TOEFL score people seem not to usually ...


10

While I believe you're hoping the answer to your question is "no, the scores won't matter," I believe that the real answer is otherwise. In many cases, minimum TOEFL scores are required by universities to ensure a certain level of competency which may be necessary for credentialing either as a research assistant or a teaching assistant. In the absence of ...


8

TOEFL is only good for 2 years, your current 106 has already expired in 2017 September. When you apply, ask the admission office what are the criteria for a TOEFL waiver. Ask if a 106 in 2015 (not a bad score itself) and a Master degree in UK can fulfill that requirement.


8

As Nate Eldredge already mentions in a comment, there will be a statement somewhere on the application page that specifies who needs to provide language scores as part of their application and who doesn't. Since schools receive large numbers of applications, there isn't really any leeway for special cases: Just follow the letter of the application ...


8

If you obtain a degree from a country where English is the official language, then nobody will ask you for English proficiency tests in later applications. This is especially the case if you are applying for a postgraduate degree in North America or Europe.


7

Almost 20 years ago, I was in charge of graduate admissions for my department, and TOEFL scores were among my biggest headaches. They just didn't provide the information I really needed: Can the applicant succeed not only as a student but also as a TA in first-year calculus or pre-calculus? (TA positions were essentially the only financial support we could ...


7

I think you should change your strategy for choosing a doctoral program. That is, determine which programs would provide you with the best training for the work you want to do. It might (probably will) involve these standardized test scores. You run the risk of narrowing your choices by starting with these types of requirements. Also, you stated that ...


7

This differs between departments, so there's no way to predict what will happen without information about your specific case. In my department, it would be nearly impossible to get admitted with a TOEFL score of 85. It would require an exception to a departmental policy and probably a university-wide policy as well (I'm not sure how flexible that one is, ...


7

The GRE is ran by ETS, so only they will be able to answer your question about why they don't allow dictionaries. Your same logic starts to question the entire point of these tests. Using Google is trivial and is engrained in our day to day lives, so why can't we use it on the tests?


6

There is no general rule here. The only solution is to look up the requirements of each program you are interested in applying to. Some schools may require both, others the TOEFL but not the GRE, or vice versa. (As for the subject test, it will most likely be required of all applicants or not required for all students. Domestic versus international likely ...


6

What ff524 said, but I will add that if you are interviewed they will judge you by that. It's reasonable since if you have the TOEFL with good marks but have already forgotten half your English, you are deemed unreliable, if you failed it on the other hand, but are at ease with English, it is easy to understand that you probably failed the essay or had a bad ...


6

You may use the books available in which some preparation exams (sample tests and past tests) are published and you can study those exams and sample tests. Some of these books and preparation materials are available in How do I prepare? page on IELTS official website, Cambridge English Exams and IELTS books and books about IELTS by other publishers. If you ...


6

It is common for a degree from an English-speaking country to exempt you from taking the TOEFL. However, it is much rarer for an English masters in a non-English speaking country to. In the US, the general rule is that they want the degree to be from an English speaking country, although exceptions can be made. It's best to consult the admissions departments ...


5

I was in this position - as an international student applying to US graduate programs after being a US undergraduate. I contacted the graduate programs I was applying to to ask if they would waive the TOEFL requirement, and they all did (i.e. I didn't have to retake it). I heard recently that the requirement for a waiver (for my current university at least) ...


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