14

A senior professor works at one university, has his own lab and research group(s). Recently, he took another part-time job at a better university. So why do professors need to take part-time jobs? Of course there's no way to say for sure based on so little information, but I wouldn't assume it has anything to do with finances, actually. The most likely ...


9

As Nate Eldredge points out in the comments, there are two types of joint appointments: With a courtesy appointment, you get the public recognition of having both titles (Professor of X and Professor of Y) and you can advise and teach in both departments. However, administratively you have a primary department that pays your salary and sets your teaching/...


7

A wide range of "Affiliate" and "Visiting" titles are often used to simplify bureaucracy in a long-duration academic interaction. For example, you may have a collaborator who frequently visits, and want to give them access to buildings, networks, and other resources so that their visits are less of a hassle for everybody. A "Research Affiliate" or "...


6

Sometimes, a second affiliation has real administrative meaning, for example if a professor's teaching duties are divided between two departments. In other cases, a professor's duties are in just one department, and the second affiliation is either just an honorary matter (saying that the second department regards him as respectable in their field also) or ...


6

Definitely talk to your advisor first. While I doubt that continuity of funding will be an issue, there could be other ones: your advisor should be allowed to advise students in BME (sometimes 'joint appointments don't by default come with the ability to be the advisor for a student). You may need to get a co-advisor in BME (or not: it depends on the rules) ...


5

There are joint appointments (split FTEs) and courtesy appointments (0 FTE lines). Joint appointments are when two departments equally (or not) contribute some of their dedicated faculty lines to a position. For example, Physics gives 0.5 FTE (half of a faculty slot) and Chemistry gives 0.5 FTE and they bring in a person who gains the title of "Assistant ...


3

Both. In general, a faculty member with an appointment in a given department normally has full rights to having graduate students from that department. Typically, though, the relative ratio of recruiting tracks well with the relative "weight" of the two appointments. A professor with a true joint appointment (50% funding, etc., from each department) is much ...


3

The most frequent use of Affiliate Professor appointments that I have seen are for people that have another primary occupation than research. Typically in the medicine field, for doctors who conduct research besides their clinical work in a university-affiliated hospital. These people need a formal appointment with the university to teach, supervise graduate ...


2

There is nothing against having a joint appointment. I would take both! At 20%, you gain from networking at the Ivy, and show up once a week...or even half day to attend faculty meetings or seminars. However, focus your research at the State school. In return for 20% support, you must co-list the Ivy in pubs and seminars you give. I’ve done this before, and ...


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