Hot answers tagged

31

Yes, you can survive there By way of personnal background (so you know that I have some knowledge of this stuff), my career is as a statistician in academia and consulting, with the latter being in the tech field where similar requirements are often set out for positions. Much of my academic work has been theory, but I've also been able to work effectively ...


15

You absolutely can do it. This answer will focus on data science, since that matches the job description you posted. I know people with similar profiles who have made the transition. It will take some work to fill in some gaps in your experience, and to think about how to make your experience relatable to an employer. Even if you don't use the tools they are ...


12

I'm not a lawyer, but suggest the following is accurate. I don't think you have anything to worry about as long as you have a contract, signed and in hand. Tenured and tenure track faculty in US are paid an annual salary, not by the week or month. The SSN is a government requirement that assure your taxes are properly paid and accounted for. Salaries are ...


10

I've lived this myself. I got a Ph.D in Electrical Engineering, and mostly did linear algebra (math) and software simulations with Monte Carlo statistics. I can't fix your toaster, do wiring, etc. So for me, I did audio firmware which sort of double-counts as EE and software engineering, for about 5 years. I eventually wound up becoming a software engineer, ...


7

I am very familiar with how AI/ML works, but I am not too familiar with all these softwares... It just seems there is no need to publish a paper using any of these tools. It almost seem that you need an entirely separate graduate degree to fully meet these criteria. You don't need a degree to meet these criteria, you just need to learn on the job for a ...


6

Programming was a second career I picked up out of necessity --it had previously been a hobby. My degree was in the humanities (philosophy). In about 10 years I've advanced steadily from an entry level position to being near the top of the career ladder at my company. My story is not unusual. Just recently I had a conversation with a colleague who was a bus ...


5

Job posting are often written by clueless HR personnel often times with the best of intentions don't know what any of the terms mean. You don't have to be the best candidate they would want, you just need to be the best candidate out of the pool of replies. Most job postings would say something to the effect that the employer reserves the right not to make ...


5

There were an official biological age limit for positions in France but it has been removed now. Now it can still be there in an un-official manner of course. But at least it is no longer in the texts. Source: a formation I followed at my ecole doctorale (advices to pursue academic carreer).


5

I do entry level recruitment for the technical division of a large company and the features that we look for in a successful candidate are: A numerate degree in a scientific or engineering discipline. An obvious interest in the technical field for which we are recruiting. Good problem-solving skills. The basics of at least one programming language. Not ...


5

I had to do a double-take when you said AI/ML to even say I recognized one of the acronyms and tech buzz terms. First job in tech was 22 years ago at age 35ish with a high school diploma. Everyone I've worked needs a quick-study, problem solver. If you have social skills, even better. I've been blessed with many opportunities, and many I wasn't qualified ...


3

My answer is slightly different: Yes you can do it, if you are willing to adapt. No one expects a new hire to hit the ground running at full speed---for every job there's an expectation that it will take some time for you to learn the environment, the culture, and the requirements. The toolkit you develop in a PhD program may or may not align perfectly with ...


2

Sure, if you are willing to learn those technologies, and not treat coworkers as servants that convert your PhD magic into code. It is very rare that a PhD has enough skills/value to the company that he can continue doing the equivalent of research without doing "boring" stuff like coding/cloud stuff. In other words if you can get PhD you easily ...


2

Speaking from people I knew in college, many physics and math majors, including Masters and PhDs, had no trouble ending up at tech jobs such as programmer, data scientist, or in quantitative finance. Companies have different hiring strategies, but many interviewers look for general problem-solving ability and reasoning skills, and are willing to look past ...


2

I did a PhD in theoretical computer science and I'm currently a (senior) software engineer at Facebook. This is counter-intuitive, but after a PhD, interviews at bigger companies are easier than those at smaller companies. Smaller companies often look for specialists. You are expected to be an expert in the tech stack in the job descriptions. On the ...


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