72

I want to make two points here, both are indirect answers to your question, but still open to interpretation with regard to your specific interview. Interviews are less like taking an exam, and more like going on a date. It is possible to do everything right, and still not click. Equally, it is possible that you do many things wrong, but the other person is ...


20

It probably depends how you put it. If you said: "I find machine learning boring, because my prof taught it in a boring way.", and machine learning is a key technique in the PhD: Yes, this was wrong, and for obvious reasons. (Then again, if you really find it boring: Why did you apply for that position in the first place.) If, on the other hand, ...


17

Possibly you made a mistake, but only the professor can judge that. But, honesty is still a good path here. Better that than to wind up in a situation that isn't productive for you. You want a position in which everyone is comfortable. Hiding your feelings or your background is probably counterproductive. But the past is the past and can't be undone. Work on ...


14

If you find ML boring, you should not apply for a position that requires it to a significant extent. A 3 year PhD is a very long time to do something that you dislike. So, hiding that you dislike a topic is not doing you any favours. If, on the other hand, you are interested in learning ML, that's a different issue, but even so, you need to know if the prof ...


7

My background is in computational mechanics, so I have some background to answer your question. It seems to me that you and the professor would make a good research team because your research interests and experience are complementary. Do not assume that the professor wants you to work on weak forms and model formulation. S/he might want to go in a more ...


2

In general you do not have to disclose the exact order or reason for data collection. Most papers are ‘narratives’ written with the available totality of data at this point. Constructs such as ‘because we found xyz we then tested if abc...’ don’t necessarily describe the actual order of events. The only times where this is truly relevant is when you run ...


2

The advice "look at the latest..." is good advice. Whether it is necessary to do depends entirely on the views of the PI. They may care deeply, or not at all. Certainly it is better to be as prepared as possible, even if their main concerns are elsewhere. If the position is competitive, then it is likely that other candidates will be as prepared as ...


2

Try to behave as you always should try to behave: In a socially sensible and sensitive way. Try to see if people want to ask another question, or whether they are happy with you to continue. Ask whether/offer that you can add more details, state that you will be happy to discuss X further ("I have also worked for a while on X, I will be happy to provide ...


2

I wouldn't be concerned. This is a common concern these days, so I'm sure they will understand. It might be that they tell you that it is not possible for legal reasons. It might however even be that they are happy to know you are willing/interested to work remotely for a while, since under the current circumstances, there might be significant difficulties/...


2

Wait and see. Can't change the outcome, anyway, so what's the use of worrying? Besides, "I failed the PhD interview because I was too honest, too informal" sounds like ...beep!


1

No, you didn't make a mistake. You will spend several years of your life studying for a PhD, and it is vital that you are genuinely interested in the topic as there will be times during your PhD where your motivation is sorely tried. I'd suggest you would be better off studying a different topic that is closer to your real interests. Pursuing a PhD on a ...


1

For job interview, I always go for harsh honestly. I am web developer and I consider it as luxury I can afford because there is a lot of offers. And basically, if you are note hired because you are too honest, I guess you don't want to work in this company. As Tasos said, yes, you have stay positive and not looking depressed in advance about what you will do....


1

I just had a PhD interview so I can relate. (1) It is always good to be honest. So, you both find the right match (2) Show motivation. And show you do not know now but you are willing to learn (3) It depends on what program you apply. If Ph.D in Machine learning then apparently not the right match. Others, less relevant. Also your interest can grow and ...


1

In an interview for a postdoc, you should be able to explain two things: First, what your future research plans are (and why this topic is right for you, due to your past work or other background). And, second, why you chose to apply for this position, and why you think you are a good fit (or rather, the fit) for the position. This implies that you know what ...


1

As @MarioNiepel says, it's not necessary. But it might be interesting for your readers to see a little bit of the the serendipity that sometimes goes into research. It helps to know that the formal structure of a manuscript does not reflect the process that led to a successful conclusion.


1

I would focus on the research "questions" that you will attempt to answer. What hypotheses you have about the subject in question. Something about how you will begin to attack the questions (methodology), even if not too detailed. If time permits, something about where you think the research would lead you in the future. If you already have ...


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