New answers tagged

2

If I understand what you have written, you can just drop them. A reading group, hoping to produce a paper in the future, doesn't yet have significant intellectual contributions to that paper to say who should be the authors of what. Once someone has earned authorship of a paper, they can't be "dropped", though some would call that a controversial ...


0

'OK, so you've got problems. That isn't MY problem. Can you do the work or can't you?' That is not something you're likely to hear today an academia, or even in many workplaces. (I HOPE you still would in the military, or in an operating theatre...) There's no downside to admitting your problem. There may even be an advantage. That's today's game. You ...


1

Sorry to hear about this. I don't know if it provides any consolation, but it is a sadly common story. The relationship I had with my supervisor was very much a professional one and he wasn't one I would have turned to for any form of moral or emotional support. I find that is quite a common situation. However if there are matters that are affecting your ...


0

I tend to agree with the other answers, I'll add this advice. But I wonder if I should completely avoid the topic of my mental health problems should it come up in conversations (“how are things going?”). Trust your instinct, avoid it if that's workable. Here are some things to consider: The sharing of information is permanent and can not be undone nor ...


6

If you have a therapist already, you should ask them for their advice rather than trust amateurs like us to help you. It's what they're for, isn't it?


12

Disclaimer: I had similar issues during my masters thesis, w/o the anti-depressants. In hindsight I probably should have talked to my advisors about my problems, but I totally agree with anyone saying that it is highly depending on your advisors. Mine very likely would have been understanding. If you feel comfortable enough, talk to someone besides your ...


34

This is highly advisor-dependent! I'll first give an answer from my perspective, and then some advice on whether that applies to your advisor. My experience in advising is that when students are dealing with anxiety or depression that I can do a better job giving good advice when the student is somewhat forthright about what's going on. So if you were my ...


51

I would suggest not mentioning it unless it becomes an issue. Your medical condition and treatment is your own business. And you are indicating no issues with your progress. Let it go. You are doing the right thing by taking your meds. If asked about an absence for therapy, just indicate a doctor's appointment. In a non-lab based field, the specific hours ...


5

Your sister should not complain to the Gunners about their behavior. While they are not being helpful, they seem at least well-intentioned, and in any case have no obligation or responsibility to help your sister (or even to avoid unwittingly sabotaging her efforts by using the Q&A platform in a way they perceive to be consistent with its intended use). ...


5

On piazza and edstem you can mark questions as private. I assume you must be using canvas or another platform without private questions as that is a trivial solution. Honestly the "gunners" are just scapegoats in this situation. The instructor(s) should be monitoring the course discussion page and reading all the questions and any answers there. If ...


2

Do not spend extra months to produce new results on this dead horse. It looks to me you undertook an ambitious thesis (very high risk, moderately high reward) ... and it turned out unsuccesful. However, you are not the one to blame: there is a thesis advisor exactly to avoid these dead-ends. Do not blame yourself, your advisor should have know better. ...


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