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10

I expect that typical European professors will be sufficiently aware of the situation in Hong Kong to understand that some PhD students will feel pressured to leave; and to be sufficiently sympathetic to the democracy movement to not think any less of those students. Mentioning political pressure should do a lot to overcome the usual stigma against people ...


3

I believe: The OP has written, but not submitted, a manuscript, which they discussed with some potential co-authors, who provided minimal input. If the OP didn't discuss authorship, then they can immediately proceed to submission without listing the potential co-authors. (Discussion doesn't generally merit co-authorship.) Even if authorship was discussed, ...


2

I understand this situation and I know colleagues having this situation. This is a tricky situation and could potentially hamper the progress of your paper and future collaborations. Firstly, although this is the right thoughts to ensure that authorship is properly credited, your co-authors may take this negatively and may affect future collaborations with ...


7

You are overthinking this. You have not cheated, and there is no need to do anything further. The goal of assignments generally is to make students learn how to independently solve the problems, and assess them on it. This is why directly copying others' work is disallowed while discussion of ideas (to a limited extent) is allowed: discussing ideas helps ...


4

I can't speak to your specific institution, because it may have different rules, but here are some general thoughts: Academic integrity rules are there to protect the degree. If it comes out that basically an entire class (or even just a single student) got their degree through work other than their own, then that degree is essentially worthless. However, ...


3

This question's answer depends strongly on field, which isn't in the question. In my fields (physics & telecoms) any positions other than first or last are largely irrelevant, and last author is actually a prestigious position. The last part is obviously not true for you, but in general detailed order matters more for the morals of those involved than ...


6

Let it go. Maybe decide to not publish with this PI in the future. But this particular hill is not important enough for you to die on.


4

Something is clearly wrong here. If your supervisor is not alarmed, talk to another senior person and make pretty damn sure your supervisor is correct not to be alarmed. There are many people you can ask: your thesis committee, your head of department, a trusted faculty member, someone from the School of Graduate Studies, and so on. Ask to speak in ...


0

Meet with your advisor, put forward a proposal for finishing all outstanding works, raise authorship and explain that you feel you should be the lead author. Move-on to discuss future works. Assuming your advisor is positive, suggest timing might be an issue and ask whether an extension is possible. If not, suggest dropping some or all of the discussed ...


0

We can't determine for you if your supervisor is intentionally sabotaging you or not. But it seems clear that you relationship is irretrievably broken. You should seek a new supervisor.


-4

You say you suspect "ADHD or essential tremor or some form of anxiety" but these are all rather divergent diagnoses, and the implication of a Kruger-Dunning effect ("the opposite of imposter syndrome" as you put it) is yet another issue that a neurological condition would be hard-pressed to explain. The entirety of your description, ...


2

In general, this is actually a question about separating your professional and personal life. It all depends on how this is handled by (I assume) you, the master's student. From the perspective of professionalism, who dates who (whom?) is not relevant to the professional conduct of either party and is, in short, nobody's business but yours. However, there ...


-1

When I was in the US, it was as you say: MS students were not valued. Also, I think most schools do not fund MS students.


5

No idea about anything specific to Korea, and haven't personally experienced this, but yeah, it seems pretty normal to me. In my field in the US it is similarly most common for people to be admitted only to PhD programs, with a masters degree as an option for people who fail to/decide not to continue. From the perspective of your coworkers, you've decided to ...


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