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2

One way is to try to ask him to help on the part you are normally doing alone. I'm not sure which way such request would work best (you may just tell him that you need some help and all other participants are busy with their own stuff, or it may happen that you both want to go to a movie and you just tell him that you cannot until you get something done, but ...


2

It sounds like this question is about undergraduate research. If an undergraduate student does not want to participate in research, that's fine. They're welcome to have other priorities. Other students have no responsibility to deal with a student who is not participating. If a student is trying to get credit for participating in research but does not ...


1

From a mathematician's point of view (I think the situation is fairly similar in CS): It should suffice to leave your research in a state where others can pick it up. For example: Any preprints that are sufficiently presentable (if not necessarily polished enough for a referee's tastes) can be posted on a preprint repository, if necessary with comments ...


0

For respecting your previous hard work and not wasting it, you can try not to quit halfaway, despite of the reasons behind quitting. As you said, the professor is excited, so see if you can ask him for help, or tell him the reasons behind quitting, especially that the required changes on your work to be accepted and published will not exhaust you as ...


0

I suggest that you frame it differently. Don't consider whether it is "professional" or not. Think about what you want to do for yourself, including how you want to interact with the professor. These may be in conflict, I understand. But it is your life. My suggestion is that you work with the professor, even if only a bit. Having a publication never hurts ...


3

No, you shouldn't go to see your advisor's father, as per other answers. The western equivalent is the sympathy card sent to your advisor (if you were very close to your advisor and had met the father in person before, you might send one to the father, too). A card with a short, handwritten note expressing your sympathy for the difficult time your advisor ...


2

I must offer a somewhat different answer. I will add that I agree with other answers that it is atypical, but we don’t know your relationship with your advisor or their family. This said, the following is going to assume you haven’t met their father. I disagree that you should absolutely avoid doing this and therefore must present that POV. Depending on ...


18

I agree with other answers. Having said that, if the father does pass away, and if it is in the same town, you may want to go to the memorial service or funeral, as this is a way to show support for the living. Going with a group of students would also be fine.


29

The situation is the same in the EU as it is in the US. You should generally not go visit unless you are close to your supervisor's father personally. If your supervisor has let you know about their father's situation, a reply similar to the one in Geoffrey Brent's answer is a good way to go. If you want to show polite interest, you can after some time ...


109

Unless you have some direct relationship with his father, this is not something we'd normally do in US, UK, or Australian culture. (I'm not sure if it's the same everywhere in the EU.) A polite option might be to tell your advisor something like "I'm very sorry to hear about your father, please let me know if there is anything I can do." If your advisor is ...


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