82

I graduated from a premier Indian university more than a decade ago and have sent out such emails. Let me try to put this practice in context. Like many universities around the world, Indian universities have a semester system and a three to four month summer break in-between. Many Indian universities (but not the IITs) have a compulsory summer internship ...


77

Generally, you should not apply for a position you have no intention of accepting. I find it is unethical to do so; others may see it as merely impolite or even not a problem at all. That doesn't seem to be the case here - you're applying and would take the offer if it's given to you and you don't have another better choice (better means better for you, not &...


72

I'd like to offer a counterpoint to Anonymous Physicist. I started school early because I was on the border of the birthday cutoff date, and then skipped my senior year of high school. So I left for college at 15. It was too early for me. Not academically. I passed all of my classes, and found a number of them still a bit boring. But going to college isn't ...


71

I believe these are genuine requests for internships. They almost all appear to be mass e-mails. Even the personalized ones usually involve just a few "fill in the blank" additions, and it's clear that applicants sometimes share templates because I've received nearly identical e-mails from different applicants. As far as I can tell, it's a vicious cycle. ...


60

Wait! Perhaps you can finish tenth grade AND attend the internship, using some people skills :) First, there should be an administrative coordinator listed in your internship correspondence. (If not, ask the offering professor for a contact name). Call this person and say that you are honored to receive an offer, and that your school calendar year runs ...


60

At least in my field, Acknowledgements are generally regarded a fairly informal mechanism. There are few rules dictating what must and mustn't go in there. However, given that mentions in the acknowledgements don't dilute formal credit, I see no reason not to be as generous, gratuitous and grateful as possible in an acknowledgements section. Its not like ...


48

It may help to look at this from the professor's point of view: You are not a student at his university (or even a citizen of his university's country), so internal research grants are not an option (indeed, he may face some backlash for hiring a non-student if research slots are limited). You are an undergraduate, so your ability to be useful to him is ...


41

This doesn't seem like an especially unusual situation to me. You had a student for a fixed-term internship, during which time she pursued an angle that did not result in a publication. The student then moved on to other things, and so did you. You kept her informed of your work that is related to what she did as a professional courtesy, but she isn't ...


40

Tell him that you do intend to participate as previously agreed, but that funding for the summer was an important consideration. If he is at all reasonable, then that should be enough. If he is offended, then he isn't being reasonable. If he offers you summer funding, then consider that, of course, but he should have little controlling say over a volunteer. ...


38

Make a decision. Do you want a PhD or not. If you do, then make that the priority. Such opportunities as the internship will probably come along later. The doctorate would probably be harder to restart if you stumble. Your advisor is giving good advice provided that the PhD is what you want. Slowing down your research may get you scooped before you complete ...


34

Don't read too much in to this. There are a variety of possible explanations, including a miscommunication between the PI and the person with whom you had the interview. It is also possible that the PI is very busy and a bit distracted and someone who delegates a lot of such things to others, such as the person you interviewed with. I would suggest just ...


33

For a presentation I would use @Jan Kukacka's answer. Say in the presentation "This work was published in our 2015 paper". For a resume you've four options as I see it: List all the authors (put yourself in bold). List the first x authors (where 10 is a common value of x) then put et al (several journals/funding bodies use this format). Choose x so your ...


32

Yes, but they are usually called "visiting researchers" or, in some cases, "residents", rather than "interns". See for example Facebook, Microsoft, or Google.


30

Yes, absolutely. I am not able to answer for every discipline and country, but this is common in many places. There are company schemes, government schemes, charitable schemes and university funded schemes to support such arrangements. For a specific example, in the UK the Royal Academy of Engineering provides Industrial Fellowships to support such ...


26

A couple of things jumped out at me about the question that I don't think have been sufficiently addressed in the other answers: This is a graduate student who was early enough in the program that she had not yet chosen her Ph.D. adviser when she was active on the project. I deduce from some of the O.P's phrasing in the post and comments that the student's ...


26

No, it's not too late to ask. But whether it is too late to get one depends on the local situation and so we can't help with that. So, ask. If you don't ask you won't get one. There is a Chinese proverb: The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is right now.


26

can I take an internship at my own company during that time? As a matter of pure semantics, I think the answer is that you cannot logically intern at your own company, in the sense that being a founder, owner, and regular employee (let alone CEO or some other high-level function which presumably you have) of a company is a distinct status from that of an ...


25

Some of the comments to this blog post by Jeffrey Shallit written in January 2010 appear to be from students from India. Comment 1: Not really. Most of the email soliciting these internships come from students who are looking for a free vacation in a foreign land, to make a bit of money and to get laid. The trend was started a few years ago, when some ...


24

I don't say this lightly, but given everything you've said: I think you should probably quit the internship, or at least present the prospect of that to your supervisor. Some key points: 1) You say it's a "voluntary internship". Well, all academic internships are voluntary (I hope!), so I think what you mean is that you are a volunteer, i.e., unpaid. [...


24

What's an "office phone"? We used to have these white (sometimes black) boxes with buttons on them many years ago, but the last round of budget cuts took them away. I don't think many people noticed their disappearance. On a more serious note, you're sounding a bit like a stalker or an annoying salesperson. If the emails aren't being answered (you should ...


23

Based on my experience in math in the U.S., you should probably give up one of them. The point is not "can you do the work?", but that such internships have a broader point that is not just some task. The people would want you to really engage, more fully than the allocated hours and salary might indicate, with their projects. That is, it's almost ...


22

"I don't think not being in traditional high school will be a hindrance to my college admissions" As a high school dropout who is now an academic, I have found skipping much of my secondary education has actually accelerated my education, career, and earnings. However, this path is not for everyone. It depends on what sort of high school is involved, the ...


21

I was recently facing the same struggle. For the purpose of a resume, I decided to write the full list of authors. A presentation is a bit different matter: it does not give you so much space for text, but you can say a lot more. In this case, I would refer to the papers on the slides the usual way: First Author et al., 2015: Marvelous publication, ...


21

It would only seem proper if everyone is informed of the situation. If everyone agrees, and you can do the work, then I see no problem. But I doubt that either of the two institutions would agree. You should probably give up one of them proactively. The offer from your professor is likely the easiest. and then they can offer it to someone else.


20

You should have been clearer about the problem earlier on. Several months ago you could have said that she needs to contribute to the calculations or else she can’t be a coauthor. Removing someone from a paper this late in the process without making expectations clear is a bad situation for everyone. Especially since she’s continued to engage conceptually ...


19

If the jury asks about my appreciation of the company where I did the internship: should I be honest in telling them what happened and that my advisor is too incompetent? Or should I lie and tell them everything was fine? You should do the same as in any other case when a professional relationship goes wrong. You need to: Focus on the facts. "The project ...


19

From the information you provide, your request looks reasonable. This is probably just a misunderstanding, and definitely a terrible (over)reaction from the prof: sending your private email to other lab members is not done. Talk to your prof. (as soon as possible) to find out what happened.


17

I don't think this practice is rude, but if these are not people with whom you have any connection, and who have not advertised a position, then I don't think you should be especially surprised that you aren't getting many responses. In all likelihood, the answer is "no" and they don't feel like anything will be achieved by telling you that. A few things ...


15

He does not know you. He does not know how well you work. He would have to give the money to you, who comes with unknown background, rather than to a student from his course who he knows is capable. Now, why would he do this? Interns are often (not always, of course) a time sink. If he accepts you for the internship, then do avoid trying to create a ...


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