155

ETH and all other universities in Switzerland are funded by the government and offer college education for minimal tuition. While foreign students are welcome to attend, the primary purpose (at least at the undergraduate level) is to provide education to the locals. Nonetheless, that doesn't seem to be a limiting factor, especially at the graduate/research ...


137

My advice is to state facts not conclusions. For example, you should not say: It's impossible to finish my degree here because they discriminate against Christians. Instead, you could say: I finished all my coursework, but I have been unable to get a spot in a lab -- there are only 10 lab spots for 40 students. Further, two different professors told ...


103

As a possible solution if you are still worried about it: Get an ORCID account. They basically created an ID, a DOI for researchers. If you link your publications to your ORC-ID, you don't need to worry if your name is very common (e.g. John Smith) or if someone misspelled your name.


96

Accents are tricky, especially in large lecture halls where students hear you over a mic, and can't see your lips. Different regions might have different opinions on what accents are difficult, depending on what other native language groups the undergrads may have been exposed to. In my opinion, it would go a long way for your undergraduates to say ...


94

Speaking as an associate editor of a US-based journal that receives many international submissions, I can tell you that: There are absolutely no guidelines or even informal suggestions that any paper should be handled differently based on the nationality of the authors or their institutions. I have never heard of anyone making editorial decisions on such a ...


71

While original research is dominated by English, good textbooks are available in most languages. Needless to say, having learning material in your native language helps a lot, even if you master English. The level of English required to read technical literature is much lower than the level required to express yourself freely and understand fast-paced speech....


71

There are some excellent answers out there, but let's add this: Not all undergraduate programs lead to graduate studies. In fact, most undergraduates go on to work. We can speculate that the work environment will be in the language of the country. Actually, there's even a place where this is the law. In Québec (Canada), most companies are required to have ...


69

Your question has a lengthy introduction, but finally: If at some point I will need to prove the authorship of a certain publication that bears a name slightly, or significantly different from what is in my documents, will that be a problem? No. A slight difference that can be explained by differences in transliteration is not a problem. This is not a ...


60

You are clearly in a tricky situation that the usual customs of academic publishing are ill-prepared to deal with. There definitely doesn't seem to be a standard, off-the-shelf solution to your problem like some kind of registry for anonymous authors. However, with a bit of creativity there might be a path forward. I suggest the following: Agree to ...


59

Disclaimer: What follows is a combination of openly-available facts and some personal opinions. The opinion parts are my own and I don't claim to speak for anyone else. I did not intend for this to be "the answer" to this question; it deals with only one country/university. I was born and raised in the United States, and got all my degrees there. I have ...


57

Empirical evidence on the relationship between GRE scores and post-graduate performance There is a massive meta-analysis by Kuncel et al (2001) that empirically evaluates the correlations between various aspects of the GRE with multiple post-graduate performance criteria. Based on hundreds of studies and thousands of participants, GRE shows reasonable ...


50

This is a good question. I have not been a fan of the GRE for 20+ years, although (through whatever luck I had a good-enough number on it myself that it didn't harm me...) many are. Having been on admissions committees and very much involved with graduate programs for 30+ years, I've had ample opportunity to see the (non-) correlation of success in graduate ...


50

In general, if you are not enrolled in any course and also are not enrolled in a program in which you may eventually earn a degree, you are not a "student."


45

There's a lovely answer by @cag51. If you're comfortable with that approach, go for it. In case you're still feeling a little queasy and would prefer to be a bit more private about the situation -- I'll make a stab at a vaguer approach: I finished all my coursework, but I would be more comfortable continuing my studies in an environment less fraught ...


43

If I were you I'd have the same concerns. In fact, I'm not like you, and I have the same concerns. But don't confuse the people of Israel with its government. Certainly there are bad actors there, but I also know many Israelis who are more than decent people and oppose the government actions and attitudes that you worry about. That said, you may be wise ...


42

This is quite a discussion currently in the Netherlands, where many -if not most- of the bachelor and master studies switched to English. However, a disadvantage of following education in your non-native language, is that it's harder to understand all subtleties. Another aspect is that in many fields (medicine, psychology) communication skills are also ...


39

In general, don't attribute inaction to malice or fraud when it almost certainly is just due to laziness, disorganization, or incompetence. University bureaucracies, especially in some countries, can be unbelievably slow. Sadly, three weeks is often not a particularly long period to go unreimbursed. Be patient and persistent and this will almost certainly ...


36

As mentioned in other questions, there’s no need at all for your academic name to match your legal name as indicated on a passport. So go wild. More generally, Евгений, I would suggest that you take pride in your name, and maybe challenge the Eurocentrism/US-centrism of science a bit by using your original name in its original spelling. — At least in ...


35

International editions are cheaper They are sold cheaper, in English speaking countries (or countries with education in English) outside North America: India, China, etc. The content is equal to that of US/North American versions. There are two reasons why they are cheaper: because they are printed in cheaper version: paperback instead of hardcover, ...


33

+1 for thinking about this before your first publication. Have you read through the other questions tagged personal-name? They may be helpful. In your case, I’d go with Alan võn Neumann, or võn Neumann, Alan if your target journal uses this format. If you include Chúrch, then I’ll guarantee that you will start being referenced as “Chúrch (2015)” - maybe ...


30

It's unlikely. See this question from 2013. If you're an employee of the Iranian government then US editors and reviewers can't handle your papers, but even in this case it's overwhelmingly probable that the editorial board will have non-US members who can. It also seems unlikely this is what's happening in your case, since if they are rejecting your paper ...


29

I would like to somewhat second David Mulder's idea to use cryptography to support your authorship claim in case it is ever needed. However, there is a simpler approach. Use a pseudonym in the paper as your author name. As suggested before, it should be roughly unique (so John Doe is not a good name). For simplicity, have the pseudonym match your gender. ...


28

Are there some fields where speaking a language other than English is necessary to perform research at an international level? It depends on what you mean by "speaking" and "necessary". In mathematics, there is no need to speak any language but English and the language of the country you are working in, but there's a real benefit to being able to read ...


28

I work in a country where a few colleagues do not wish to visit, for various reasons. Some of these reasons are based on accurate perceptions and others are not. Some of those colleagues have been willing to frankly discuss their concerns with me, and in some cases I have been able to appropriately assuage their fears; in the end, these people came and ...


28

As far as I have ever seen, the length of your PhD program is irrelevant as far as considerations of future employers, etc. People (in academia) will mostly look at your publications, and possibly reference letters and reputation of your supervisor(s)/university. In particular, in all cases I know of seniority/age limits for grants count from date that your ...


27

First of all, always be consistent. Whatever you decide, that is what you will always have to use. Considering the first point, might be better to strive and use your real name as it is with the non-english characters. You will have less problems in the future to prove your authorship in case questions rise. Complain to systems who do not accept your non-...


27

Publishing under a pseudonym and receiving credit later has been possible under rare circumstances. For example, William Sealy Gosset published under the name "Student" because of restrictions imposed by his employer, and his discovery of Student's t-test wasn't publicly credited to him until after his death. Dan Romik's excellent answer outlines a ...


26

In some cases, these international editions are sold at a fairly steep discount compared to their U.S. versions. This is intended to increase their accessibility to students in developing countries. The intention behind omitting material that is in the "nice, but not essential" category, such as a particular problem etc. is to interfere with its utility in ...


26

Asking someone to work without compensation is illegal in many jurisdictions. It is also hardly ethical. Unfortunately, it is also not uncommon in academia. In modern "publish or perish" academia professors are often under a huge deal of pressure from university administration to produce countless high-quality papers and teach ever-growing number ...


25

University HR offices, probably like many HR offices, can de difficult to deal with. I would email the HR person you have been in contact with, along with the department admin/search chair electronic copies of the receipts explaining what happened. I tend to scan the originals, prior to mailing them. If you have copies that is even better. There is no reason ...


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