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2

Here's how I'd look at the situation in case OP (or a future reader) is in Germany. In Germany, the IP of a Bachelor or Master thesis is almost always owned by the student. With software, there may be a more complicated situation if the student wasn't the only author of that software - but the exam regulations for the thesis would anyways require that the ...


20

Unless you are angling for commercial use of your code, you should post the code publicly, to GitHub, your own website, etc. To be clear, you are almost definitely under no obligation to do provide your code. You have completed your Master's. Absent an express agreement regarding the IP in your source code (not mentioned, by implication there is no express ...


18

Why would you refuse? You might want “negotiate” an explicit acknowledgment at the end of any paper that uses your code as seed for something else (“ We thank Jan Schwarz for permission to use an older version of this code which he developed” or “This code is build on a previous code by Jan Schwarz” or something you think better reflects the situation, like ...


147

You developed the code as part of your curriculum. It's quite possible that therefore, the source code belongs to the university anyway. This does depend on the laws of the country your university is in. Also, I don't see what you should be concerned about. Someone else building on your work is exactly how science is supposed to proceed. If I were you, I'd ...


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