12

Scopus journal list: https://www.scopus.com/sources.uri Thomson Reuters Master Journal List: http://ip-science.thomsonreuters.com/mjl/


10

Anyone who is reasonably experienced in your field (i.e., anyone who might hire you) will know which venues are "relevant". They won't base this on IEEE Xplore, Scopus, or DBLP, but on their own knowledge of the field. Hopefully, anyone who would hire you will also know enough to evaluate your work directly to some extent, rather than relying on the ...


10

Thomson Reuters customer support explanation on SCI and SCIE:. The Science Citation Index (SCI) is a sub-set of the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), containing journals that rank competitively among the most highly-cited core journals in their category or categories. The Science Citation Index Expanded is essentially the web version of what ...


9

Computer science is typically badly under-represented in the "traditional" citation indices, which do not consider conferences to be peer-reviewed publications. As any computer scientist knows, that is a bad joke: many computer science conferences are much more stiffly reviewed and difficult to enter than most journals. It is for this reason that DBLP ...


8

There are good journals that are not listed in the SCI, so this alone does not mean that the journal is bad. However, an overly long list of topics including non-descript terms like "web-service" and "Future technologies" looks bad. Also the sentence "Our journals’ impact factors have been compiled by Indexing Citation Board (ICB)." is pretty suspicious, ...


7

From Thomson Reuters: ... the evaluation of and acceptance of a journal for the SCI or the SCIE is essentially the same with ONE major difference. The only difference is the storage media. SCI is only available on CD/DVD format; however, SCIE is available online.


7

This has happened before. Just update the arXiv version and indicate in the "Comments" field and ideally also inside the file itself that the version is newer than the published one. Examples of such updates: https://arxiv.org/abs/0801.3306v4 (sadly, the Comments field isn't too clear here) https://arxiv.org/abs/1605.04832v1 (here, the fact that this is a ...


7

Besides the already mentioned options arXiv and Zenodo, you can also check if your have a local institutional repository and whether it is indexed by Google Scholar. Additionally, you can search in OpenDOAR (DOAR = Directory of Open Access Repositories) for repositories based upon subject area, content type, repository type, ...


6

It really depends on your field to determine if it is worth publishing in or not. Some reputable, but niche, journals don't get indexed very broadly but are well respected and read by members of that discipline. As such, your best bet is to see if you recognize any of the names of peers in that journal and then publish accordingly. You might also want to ...


6

International Scientific Indexing (ISI) has a list on their website. The same is valid for the Science Citation Index (SCI). You can search for journals by title.


6

That is correct: most good computer science conferences have not been indexed by the standard journal indexes (maybe this will change someday, but it hadn't last I'd heard). A good alternative for evaluating the quality of a conference or to search for decent conferences is to use Google Scholar's "venue metrics" function. For example, searching for "...


6

I think that there is a critical distinction to be made here between defining reputable indexing services and identifying such services. I suspect that for most well-established scholars, it is relatively straightforward to identify whether an indexing service is reputable or not. For example, if you talk to a computer scientist, they'll point to DBLP, ...


5

Google Scholar is not a normal indexing service, in the sense that it does attempt to index only "trusted sources." You should be somewhat wary of any publication venue that advertises itself as being indexed by Google Scholar, since this is practically meaningless. For INSPEC and many other indexing services, the service itself may have a list of indexed ...


4

Some theoretical background regarding the impact factor: The impact factor released in the summer of year X ist the impact factor X-1 which means, it takes into account all references of the papers published in year X-1 citing papers published in the years X-2 and X-3. Currently, in spring 2017, the latest impact factor was released in summer 2016 and it'...


3

There are various APIs that other services can use to search assorted indices from other sites For example, according to the about page of ShortScience.org: The search can access all papers in the DOI, arχiv, dblp, and Bibsonomy databases Some of those (e.g. DBLP) only host bibliographic data; others (e.g. arXiv) host the full text of articles or ...


3

In addition to jakebeal's answer, let me address the "How to propose that change?" question. Surely the requirement to have work indexed at Scimago and Scopus was instantiated to have some "measurable" guideline -- the initiators of the project probably wanted to avoid any discussions on what papers should count and what shouldn't later. While this is ...


3

It only means that was it submitted. In order to be added to the TRCP index, the submission needs to approved by the Thomson Reuters staff before it will be added. If the information on the conference website is up to date it means they have not (yet) been rejected but that does not mean their submission or application will be approved. I have no idea how ...


3

It does sound like rather tentative wording. Thomson Reuters cannot, would not, and should not accept all and any submissions of anything for indexing - it would swamp the system with spam. So to me, it sounds like the conference has applied to be indexed, but it is certainly not absolutely guaranteed that they will be included in the Thomson Reuters ...


3

I think the correct understanding is that: 1) All journals in SCIE and SCI undergo the same selection process, i.e. the regularity of publication, the peer review process, the editorial team, etc. So you can said they all passed the "quality check" (this doesn't mean they are the same quality..., even not all journals in SCI are same quality, aka Science/...


3

I got an explanation from Clarivate Analytics: Based on the fact that Thomson Reuters selects journals of SCIE (including SCI) through a strict selection process, we hereby prove that journals of Science Citation Index® (SCI) and Science Citation Index ExpandedTM (SCIE) have the SAME QUALITY as the journal selection process for journals of SCI and SCIE is ...


3

There are lot of questions embedded in your question. Follow the following links: Difference between SCOPUS and Web of Science What is the difference between SCI and SCIE? SSCI-Wiki Googling further would result in more comprehensive answers. See the related question on the right-hand side of your academia SE page. My paper that I submitted to "The ...


2

Scopus, just like DBLP, has standards. In fact, if you look at Scopus' description of the conference coverage, it appears that they actually just scrape DBLP to get their computer science conference listings. As such, while I don't know about the particular conference that you mention, I would expect that anything that DBLP drops, Scopus will drop as well.


2

The only mathematical journals that I think highly of and that I have noticed at any point not being indexed by Thompson Reuters where simply too recent. For example, Forum of Mathematics (both Pi and Sigma parts) is currently not indexed, but I bet it will soon be. Of course, I may have missed others. Added in response to user's comment: you did find one I ...


2

The selection process used by Thomson Reuters for choosing journals is described, in detail, on this page: http://wokinfo.com/essays/journal-selection-process/ The basic standards (see the link for more information) are: TIMELINESS Timeliness of publication is a basic criterion in the evaluation process. It is of primary and fundamental importance. ...


2

Since impact factors change from year to year, you typically report the impact factor during the year that the paper was published, when referencing your own article from that journal. Past impact factors often indicate what the future impact factor will be, but is not a guarantee. So, (if impact factor is important) you should base your decision on the last ...


2

Before answering the question directly as asked, I would like to add few personal comments: This has been a growing culture for Ph.D. research in many developing countries including India to focus on Impact Factor of a journal before submitting the work. However, although it makes sense to say about your publication by quantifying the quality of the journal ...


2

Web of Science has a lag of potentially several months before a given paper from an indexed journal is uploaded. There is (I believe) nothing at all you can do about this - it's simply a matter of their workflow taking time due to the level of manual involvement needed. I would normally say that you could reasonably expect it to be up after about three ...


2

I work for a biomedical literature database - Europe PMC, which makes citation data freely available. You can access it programmatically, via the articles API (https://europepmc.org/RestfulWebService#cites). This resource also tracks data citations for over 20 different public resources: https://europepmc.org/Help#trackdatacit


2

I have been using Scimago Journal & Country Rank It's apparently powered by Scopus. You can select among different science fields and see the top journals. Journals are put in categories of quality (can be different for each field in multidisciplinary journals). You can rank the journals per field or see how a specific journal performs now and in the ...


2

Article metadata and bibliography management is usually a service provided by the journal. In this there might be variations in the diligence with which it is done. But in general the metadata and citations data are pushed to indexing services. So yes, Google Scholar does get the updated data, either directly or via crawling, and will update citations, page ...


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