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31

I am Latino, and as a result have an even worse version of this issue. My full name is of the form A B C D E, with A and B being given names, and C D and E being surnames. An extra complication is that D is not a name by itself, it's just a preposition. I have given the TOEFL and GRE tests before and that has not been an issue. Minor errors may occur ...


8

My U.S. grad program in math had already been reducing attention to GRE subject test for years, due to its manifest uselessness for predicting success in our grad program. (I've been involved in grad admissions here almost continuously since about 1985, and have been Dir of Grad Studies in math for two stints, so I've really paid a lot of attention to this.) ...


6

A few things that helped me Pomodoro Technique - Study for 25 minutes with a 5-minute break in-between. After 4 Pomodoros, give yourself a longer break. Timeboxing - Limit your study time to specific times of the day, like 9-4 with a lunch break. This will train your brain to expect to focus during the time-window, then do other things after. Combine this ...


4

When I review grad school applications, the math subject GRE scores are usually a binary pre-filter. If someone scores below our cutoff (which is usually a 600 for MS, 650 for PhD), they are pretty much automatically removed. We need students who can assist in teaching undergrad math and they need to at least have some base competency. That is the extent of ...


4

Probably you should just go ahead and do it. In particular, I think reading an application with no GRE score, I generally would guess the score is lower than the one you listed (though, this year, who knows). It's impossible to fully predict the effect it has (most notably, you don't mention how strong the rest of your application is), but I think at most ...


3

Don't lose track of the purpose of the SoP. It is to detail your future plans, both for study and thereafter. It is not to explain the past or to make excuses. I assume that if they are making exceptions for GRE scores then they will want to "level the playing field" for all candidates. I can't guarantee it, of course. But I'd assume that it can ...


3

If the system is fair, which I can't guarantee, if the GRE is optional then it won't be used, formally, to distinguish between students. But it is hard to say what goes on in the minds of individuals on a committee. But in particular, it shouldn't (in a fair system) be held against you if you don't submit. That does make the other factors more important in ...


3

Medical issues, especially during your earlier years, are worth explaining in your SOP BUT it's not worth making an extra statement/essay. You don't want to be overdramatic with it, rather maybe a line or two in the sense of the whole SOP/application. GPA is a bit low, but you have a strong upward trend, plus all the issues were in your earlier years so ...


3

(I used to work for ETS/College Board) As long as all of your records always use 'Y Z' as your surname you shouldn't worry. The stories/rumors you've perhaps heard from colleagues happen when the student or their parent is inconsistent, such as: Sometimes you see a student who has something like a Secondary Diploma 'X Y' Undergraduate Diploma 'X Z' and ...


2

Check the website of the department you are applying to, and whether they require the Mathematics subject test. If they do not mention anything about it, then it is not required, and will not be taken into account even if you submit it. As you are applying for an engineering department, I am fairly confident that the Mathematics subject test is neither ...


2

Take them at their word that not submitting it won't be a negative. On the other hand if you think you will get an exceptional score then it might be a small positive factor. But, no longer a large factor since many applicants won't be submitting it so there is no comparative advantage in that alone. The reason they still accept it is that the overall ...


2

Only the General Test, as far as I am aware, because far more people take this test compared to the subject tests. Subject tests are more specialized, similar to what the SAT Subject Tests used to be. Therefore, there are fewer people taking each specific subject test and not so much a need to provide an at-home testing option. Maybe ETS might make such an ...


1

Do you have programs of interest? I am kind of wondering the same thing (though I do plan on applying this cycle), however at the stage the US is at in the pandemic (presumably, where you would be planning to do your PhD in), it is more likely to vary from school/department to school/department. Some universities may waive the GRE altogether on a permanent ...


1

This is something that you may well ask your prospective universities. Also depends on which fields you are planning on pursuing. Second score seems overall better, but your question doesn't have a lot of information to go off of. I would note that if your program doesn't weigh GRE nearly as much compared to GPA and research experience (let alone making it ...


1

Nope. My last name is 2 words, and it hasn't been a big problem in most places. Sometimes at the pharmacy or something, I have to ask them to check my last name as one word though. But it's rare.


1

This will vary by institution in the US. Some will return, others not. It is likely to depend on how the experience of making predictions about success of applicants turns out without it. If the other indicators prove adequate there will be little pressure to return. But, I suspect that many, if not most, will return to using it since, for the institution, ...


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