New answers tagged

5

If you filed a patent having nothing to do with the university, and then sign a paper saying that the university is the assignee for any patents you filed with the university during your time there, OF COURSE there is a possibility that one impacts the other. You may be ceding exclusive ownership on behalf of your employer -- and there have been cases where ...


3

This very much depends on your local legislation. As @Buffy says, in some countries this is considered normal. In other countries, it is not normal and any such agreements may even be void. To give an example: The latter would be the case e.g. here in Germany, IP of a non-employed student stays with the student and requiring them to sign over their rights ...


27

Yes, it is normal. Universities often require this - especially of faculty, but also, often enough of students. You have an issue that you can probably work out with the university. If the patent wasn't related to your work in the educational program, then the university probably has no real claim. But the lawyers for your employer and for your university ...


22

My first question is, is [being told to retrospectively assign patent rights] normal? No: Assigning any patent rights in advance is normal, doing so retrospectively is not. My second question is, I did file a patent during my enrollment, however, it was with my employer and had nothing to do with my school work, will this cause some sort of conflict of ...


Top 50 recent answers are included