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165

My question is, is there anything else I can do to push this professor to respond to me and to set up a time to conclude my research project? I recommend that you don't send your professor any more communications than you already have, and in this case, it is completely inappropriate to "push" him to do anything. The death of a loved one in one's family is ...


157

You are responsible for teaching the students to the best of your ability, and to judge their capacities to use what they have learned. That judgment is made based on their grades. So you have several things to think about here. Are you teaching the best you can? Teaching does not mean "downloading facts", as I'm sure you're aware. It means "...


107

If attending a graduation ceremony is not your cup of tea, you don't need to go. Better to stay away than to go and be uncomfortable! It would be considerate to let your department know that you won't be attending. Some universities make more of a thing of graduation than others, so depending on the vibes at your school, you might want to have some travel ...


95

Take the example of a medical student. Do you want to pass someone who does not have the necessary knowledge to treat patients correctly? It is your duty to make sure that only the ones who know what they are doing will pass. This may be less strict in other subjects but the principle is the same. --- EDIT --- Another example where this becomes clear would ...


68

From the point of view of a faculty at a mid-size university: I honestly do not care if students walk or not. Any kind of personal congratulation or communication I want to have with outgoing students I do on my own time. I'm not going to keep track of any particular student (or count on being able to find such a person) at a graduation event. This might be ...


62

You can use the formulation Degree to be conferred MM/YYYY to indicate that you have passed all degree requirements, but are waiting for the degree to be officially awarded. This occurs fairly frequently, particularly for PhD students, who may finish at any time of the year, especially if their university only confers degrees once per year.


58

I think it's reasonable for X to ask, but you have no obligation to say "yes". In particular, 2-3 months of weekends is a lot of time to work for free. I think that if you choose, it would be reasonable for you to politely say that this is too much, and that he needs to get somebody else to do that analysis. If this is work that you have already done a lot ...


52

I still have a hard time believing that I could graduate without knowing it. Me too. I would request a transcript and perhaps investigate to see whether "transferring military experience to credits" is something that routinely happens. It would be nice to document your concerns and get a written response from the college saying that everything is on the up-...


48

This is not uncommon in the country where I did my PhD (the Netherlands). There you have to print a reasonably large amount of hardcopies anyway, typically people get around 200-300 copies in my field. It is not uncommon to send some copies to researchers that you genuinely believe may be interested in the work, usually people that you have been in contact ...


48

Ultimately you aren't responsible for the behavior of your students nor for their bad decisions. You aren't responsible, either, for how they react to a failure. For some students, as I have seen, a failure can be a wake-up that gets them onto a better path. You certainly aren't responsible for the terrible way that we finance higher education in the US as ...


41

To answer a specific question: What happens if he doesn't issue me a grade? In a US-like university system (which based on your terminology I'm assuming), what would normally happen is that you'd be temporarily assigned a placeholder grade, possibly I (for Incomplete) or possibly something else that indicates some sort of administrative delay. Your ...


38

This is called an administrative encumbrance, it is indeed very standard. The general notion is that if you owe the university money, then the administration will deny you things. These things may include: unit results, the ability to graduate, exam timetables, or the ability to enrol in new units. In what was certainly a bug, students at my wife's ...


32

It is conventional in many places for faculty who participate in a graduation ceremony to wear the regalia from the university where they got their degree. Some universities have more... elaborate regalia than others.(See e.g. Etiquette of wearing the wrong academic robes at graduation as a lecturer in the UK, especially this comment. And this.) Others ...


30

In some countries you print a large number of copies (as stated by Pieter Naaijkens), in some only a single digit number which should then be distributed to a specific set of recipients. Regardless it is not unusual that a person might distribute copies to people that might have some interest in it. It is, however, not a must and the recipients is up to the ...


27

As noted in the comment, the location might change our opinion of the problem, however I will make notes from my experience. When I graduated with my first degree I hired a gown as I could not see the value of owning one and knew I would study for higher degrees, and perhaps I could buy one later in my career. I received my second degree in-absentia because ...


27

Yes, it is normal. Universities often require this - especially of faculty, but also, often enough of students. You have an issue that you can probably work out with the university. If the patent wasn't related to your work in the educational program, then the university probably has no real claim. But the lawyers for your employer and for your university ...


25

The institution itself is pretty unlikely to care. INTJ's a pretty common personality type in your major's field, so many of your instructors and peers probably feel the same way. Consider your family The one big consideration to make is your family. Depending on your family status and family members' inclinations, they might be the sort that's ...


24

Don't bother. It's over 10 years since my ceremony, I've been in academia all that time, and I've never seen the need. I've also seen very few faculty with their own robes. For graduation most institutions I know of will organize robe hire (and pay for it), so there's not even that incentive.


24

By all means do what you feel is best for you, but please don't typecast yourself based on the result you got from a Myers-Briggs test. It's more insulting to academia to perpetuate that pseudoscience than to not attend your convocation. Please don't claim to require logical reasoning for things when your basis for not attending isn't based on logical ...


23

No, you can't state that 2015 is your graduation year. The year you graduate has a well-defined meaning -- it's the year the university confers your degree to you. Period. Writing that 2015 is your graduation year would be the same, ethically, as writing that 2013 is your graduation year just to make your resume look more impressive. Your resume will, ...


23

This is very simple. I care about my students, and want the best for them. Languishing in graduate school is rarely optimal for anyone. And then there is the issue of funding. For the same reason -- concern for my students' wellbeing -- it is very important to me to provide them with RA funding as close to year-around as possible. If funding starts to get ...


23

As I say in the comments and djechlin says in his answer, one's official student status is entirely determined by the institution in which the student is enrolled. You can ask them at any given time whether you are a student, and they'll tell you. If you want to know when you will lose your student status assuming that you complete all the requirements and ...


22

You're not failing the students. Assuming you performed your teaching job well, and you're grading them fairly, the students are failing themselves. They didn't study well enough to pass the class, or maybe they just don't have a talent for this material. Giving someone a passing grade when they haven't earned it is not fair to them, and it dilutes the value ...


22

My first question is, is [being told to retrospectively assign patent rights] normal? No: Assigning any patent rights in advance is normal, doing so retrospectively is not. My second question is, I did file a patent during my enrollment, however, it was with my employer and had nothing to do with my school work, will this cause some sort of conflict of ...


21

I think it is generally a mistake to kick a sleeping tiger. What will you gain if you are told it was a mistake? I'd ask for a formal transcript and see what it shows. If all looks well, then use it to apply to a four year program and see what happens. My best guess is that you will have no particular issues about this, other than a poor gpa. If you then ...


20

I asked this question on the Facebook 'Academical Dress' group, where Patrick Cook was able to find out who the figure in green is: It is Polish. The gentleman in question if Prof. Maciej Henneberg. His qualifications are listed as MSc, PhD and DSc (Dr habil), all from A Mickiewicz University, Poznan. So I'm guessing the gown is either the PhD or the DSc. ...


19

There isn't a formal, universally accepted title here. The general standard has been to call them "Doctor" since everything else is in principle a formality. The only other note that I'd make is that it's not commencement that makes the student in question a doctor, but rather conferral of the degree by the university. Some universities may confer degrees ...


19

I have, so far as I can remember, physical copies of three PhD theses that were not written by my own students. (I do not have a physical copy of my own PhD thesis.) Two of these were indeed PhDs from the Netherlands, where they bind the theses in an attractive way and clearly send them out rather broadly. One of them is from an older student in my ...


18

Something other answers did not yet address - by giving unfairly good grades to undeserving students, you are dramatically, and unfairly, penalizing good students. Students - in large part - choose to attend a university based on its academic reputation. Perhaps, paying premium. If your lax grading methods graduate unfit students instead of failing them, ...


17

Thanks for asking this important question! I will address three aspects of surviving your next year as a job market candidate and primary caregiver: changes in research style, finances, and emotional balance/accepting help with childcare. Before launching into it though, I do want to emphasize that things get easier. Eventually, baby learns to sleep. ...


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