New answers tagged

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Ask your university, though undergraduate grades probably won’t matter because you’ll probably need to complete a Master’s Degree first. Generally, there are two different methods for PhDs to be structured- ones that take 5-6 years to complete and include a coursework component and can be entered directly after finishing a Bachelor Degree, and ones that don’...


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It depends on the structure of the PhD in question. Ask the university. Basically, there are generally two different types of PhD courses: ones that include a coursework component, and those that don’t. Typically, these will be offered by universities in the USA and in Europe, respectively, though as always it’s possible that any given university might be ...


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In your final semester, it may be exceedingly difficult to show a solid change in your habits and work ethic that I would say would be good for convincing others if you turned it around in the last 2 or 3 semesters. However, you say possibly doing a PHD in the future. If that doesnt mean immediately applying, then gaining relevant experience at work and ...


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It very much depends on the Country, the Field, and the Master's. I'm assuming, since you are asking that you are interested in Country where a Master's degree isn't an absolute requirement for a PhD in your field of interest. My field (Life-Sciences) in my country (UK) is like this. I would say that it very much depends on the Master's degree. As far as ...


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You need to have a masters degree to even be able to apply for a PHD. It's a basic legal requirement. In most countries (In Europe and America. USA being different clearly than the rest of the continent while most latin countries have extremely similar systems between them and regarding Europe given the inspiration came from there) you need to have graduated ...


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List them anywhere reasonable rather than not listing them at all. Probably you can give short descriptions so that there is no misunderstanding. But let the reader judge the significance rather than assuming that they aren't worth listing. Err on the "say more" side rather than "say less". And, if you can send a Statement of Purpose, mention there how ...


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Yes, it will be a plus. And no, you won't need to go into details. But get a letter of recommendation from a superior. But part of its being a plus is that it is closely related to your academic trajectory and not something different. And, with permission from the DoD, you can probably say some things, even if not especially detailed. You can, for ...


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I suggest you contact them with a letter of interest as soon as you can. You should have a CV and a SoP in good shape, but you probably have a short time to refine it if they show interest. Letters and such can probably be safely delayed for a bit until everyone is serious. But, since they ask for references, names will probably do for the moment. But you ...


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I doubt that it would have any effect at all. You might be better to stress other, more recent things. Presumably your transcripts show proficiency in statistics sufficient for entry. I doubt it would do harm other than to have someone, possibly, question why you did that. And a 3 isn't a huge benefit, as your undergrad experience showed. However, if ...


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Yes they count. "work experience, internships or volunteer work" is clearly more broad then just regular employment. Just make clear what type of position each role was. If there is some other section that allows you to report other types of research experience you could be free to classify these either way, it wouldn't affect much. The people reading ...


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I suggest that employment history should probably be reserved for situations in which you were actually paid for your work. You will have to think about whether a "stipend" qualifies. But "payroll" certainly would. But such things are naturally work experience and most people might agree that they are internships (or at least similar). I think volunteer ...


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If you are looking up the solutions to the exact (or trivially similar) questions you are being asked in your homeworks, then that is cheating. It is bad for all the reasons that cheating is bad: you are not doing the assignment the professor wants in the manner they want you to do it; you are side-stepping the challenge. Your performance in the assignment ...


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You can just carry on with this approach through graduate school and well into your career as a professional mathematician. For instance I have at least one series of papers that started because of answers I got to a mathoverflow post when I was confused about something.


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I’m worried if Letters of Recommendations not coming from the same ‘XYZ’ area Professor will not help my case. While a letter from someone who is an expert in the subject of your doctoral research is better, it's much more important that the letter writer know about your research record. Sensible graduate admissions committees know that not all ...


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I imagine that this is one of those situations in which far too many people have this "not invented here" mentality. It is something every one of goes through at some point in our lives. For example, a beginner programmer might insist that he or she has to write their own code for any and all functions that they wish to implement, including shunning the use ...


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As students read textbooks and solve exercises, but do not have access to them while writing the actual exam. So is the case with StackExchange. You don't have access to it while writing the actual exam. Whatever case you follow, as long as you did well on the exams, why should it matter? BTW, if you do join PHD, please use mathoverflow.


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No-one really knows the educational effects of reliance on SE yet, mostly because you, and your generation, are the canaries down the coal-mine. Most of the experts who answer questions on the technical SE sites are people who completed their graduate education before SE existed, and some before the Internet was even in regular use. Those of us who answer ...


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"... unless you went through a textbook and attempted to prove every theorem yourself first you won't truly understand the subject" Nonsense! This is anxious, perfectionistic thinking, and internalizing thoughts like this ultimately caused me to leave academia. I felt that I couldn't pursue my research unless I fully understood everything from first ...


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There are a lot of aspects of training to be a mathemtician. For example, you want to learn: Mathematical theory (definitions, key theorems, key constructions) Literature search (figuring out what's in which papers, finding results in books, using google to find relevant ideas) Mathematical tricks and proof techniques How to struggle with a difficult ...


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Really, the answer to this is very simple. Everything that you can find on the internet has already been done by someone else. What you are required to do in PhD research is something which has not been done by anyone else yet. Of course, the web may still give you good ideas about techniques, etc. But SE or (any other web forum) isn't actually going to "...


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Instead of me looking through your questions on Math SE like Ethan Bolker suggests, let me tell you what I would look for and evaluate instead, and then let yourself do the self-evaluation (which is also an important skill to develop as a researcher!). Basically, I would look at if your questions are well received. If you hit the hallmarks of a "good ...


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I intended to answer after looking at the kinds of questions and answers you posted on Math SE. I was surprised to find none linked from your profile. Stack Exchange can be a good place to "discuss mathematics", but if all you did was lurk, reading other people's entries, you have not discussed much, and may not be as ready for further study as others here ...


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If personal reasons prevented you from doing your best in school, and you still managed to be one of the top two students, that’s a point in your favor. It’s absolutely fine to mention the issue in your application cover letter, not for sympathy points, but simply to explain the situation. Committee members are humans and will usually be understanding ...


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First of all, I believe this is extremely common these days. More and more I notice students neglecting to develop important problem solving skills and instead developing great “google-fu” and “stack-exchange-fu” skills to achieve the same goals. Now, don’t get me wrong, SE-fu is a terrific skill to have. Just like you are worried about using the internet ...


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Yes! In fact, I think you're well on your way to doing better than your peers! Taking longer to understand something isn't something to be proud of! There's no need to reinvent the wheel. If someone can help you understand something, you would be well-advised to make use of them. In the same way, you would be well-advised to attend the lectures, thereby ...


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I wouldn't worry too much. It sounds like you are making excellent progress. You are still an undergraduate, you have tons of time ahead of you! There are lots of good ways to learn mathematics. Talking with others (including over the Internet) is one. Allowing yourself to get stuck, and trying hard to come up with your own proofs is another. If you feel ...


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I'll address specifically the last part of the question: (This concern recently came up with since I read the requirement of one physics program that at least two of the LORs should be from professor in physics.) I would not interpret this as meaning anything about the name of the department that someone is affiliated with. A physicist housed in a math ...


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Tell the school(s) exactly that (leaving out the baby and so on) and ask for advice. They may make some exception (or not). Maybe permitting you to submit. Maybe being lenient on deadlines. Maybe contacting the professor themselves (if you provide her email.) You could also ask her to send the original email directly to them, rather than dealing with the ...


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Would it be fine to let them know that one professor is already willing to accept me to their program? I see no ethical issue with your general desire to network with potential advisors and make a good impression. However, be very careful that you do not misrepresent what you have been told by that professor. In your previous sentence you say that "she ...


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Not in economics either (but I have a sibling who has a PhD in it, and that basically informs my perspective) While having formal credentials is always helpful, I think you might be OK as long as your applications (A) prove that you have a solid base in economics (even if it's self-taught), (B) demonstrate that you have some sense of direction in terms of ...


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Disclaimer: I'm not in economics You might consider applying for a MS degree first. I don't know about economics, but I know that in my field at my university, we are a little more selective about Ph.D. admissions versus MS admissions, having something like twice as many MS candidates as Ph.D. candidates. If you otherwise had good GPA and good test scores, ...


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The topics you mention (theoretical and computational aspects of high energy physics) are similar enough that any publication you get from one will be equally valuable when applying for the other. In fact, demonstrating that you have experience of both theoretical and computational work can only make your application stronger than if you had experience in ...


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If I read your question correctly, it seems that you want to do interdisciplinary work. That is highly valued in some places, even if it is a bit unusual. But to make it happen requires that you have an advisor who is on-board with the concept and that you have sufficient additional resources across the fields of study. This might mean a co-advisor. And if ...


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I doubt that your admission to a program anywhere would hinge on the difference here. Doing any sort of research is a plus. You need an application showing academic success and future promise. You seem to be showing that. Also note that arXiv is quite different from journal publishing. The former will be less valuable (if a journal article doesn't later ...


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(slight edit to clarify my perspective after reading Buffy's answer) Is applying for PhD in mechanical engineering but not intending to do research with a mechanical engineering professor viewed negatively? In my opinion, you're asking the wrong question. Don't ask how the admissions committee will view this, ask if you should even be considering doing ...


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The general answer for all such questions is no, you aren't too old. Even if you were 60. Actually, masters programs are meant for qualified candidates, not for some age group. The fact that most people continue through schooling without breaks explains the age distribution in graduate degrees, not some hidden rules and not market forces. Your ...


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I'm in a similar position. I'm a junior (also at a well known university) at 15, set to graduate at about 17 years old. I'm also working in the field of AI, with 3-4 publications to my name, one first authorship, in good journals and conferences. I've also done a couple of internships (though this is not so relevant to PhD applications). When I entered ...


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Every university in the U.S. has different policies regarding each element of your/your son's predicament. Some accept students into Ph.D. programs immediately from undergrad; some only accept into Masters programs; some accept into Ph.D. programs provisionally-- that is, they must meet some benchmark of performance at some point during their first few years ...


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Generally speaking, any material that is not asked for will not be considered in an application for a postgraduate degree. Admissions procedures attempt to create a level playing field for applicants as well as minimise the amount of time it takes to evaluate an application, and extras that aren't asked for are tossed in the bin. Some places may treat that ...


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In the US this is probably possible as long as you aren't overestimating your knowledge of the subjects you mention. The courses you mention are pretty much the core of a BS in math in the US. Most US students, though, would probably opt for a doctoral program instead, which is the more common path. If you haven't taken those courses, however, but just ...


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If you worked closely with a senior postdoc or graduate student, you can ask that person to write you a letter. While they would not have the name recognition that your advisor does, they would be able to provide actual examples of your research skills, problem-solving abilities, and writing that the actual PI probably cannot match. Admissions committees ...


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I'd say your best course of action is to notify the institution that you are applying to that there has been a delay, and to find someone else who can write you a recommendation within a week's time. The admissions department is likely to have a little bit of grace period for you to work with, but probably not more than a few working days. That said, they ...


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I'm going to give a Canada specific answer. Since your son is Canadian, I'd highly recommend that he do a MSc before pursing a PhD. There are a few reasons for this: A PhD is a long, huge, often painful commitment, and someone who is 18 might not know what they want to do with their life. If he decides he'd rather do industry than academia, an MSc will ...


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Are these people identical twins? Presumably despite having similar “profiles” they are distinct human beings each with their own name, personality, interests, and goals. The superficial fact that they come from the same undergraduate institution seems totally irrelevant from the point of view of a professor or graduate admissions committee. So basically ...


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Your decision may depend a lot on when the PI might know for sure. Why don't you start by asking him how long that might take? If either (1) there is a chance that he can secure the funding or (2) you might be willing to work even if there is no funding, then it makes sense to apply. This way, you retain the option of either accepting or declining later. ...


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Don't confuse the purpose of the CV with that of the SoP. The former looks to the past, what you have already accomplished. The Statement of Purpose, on the other hand looks to your future and what you expect to do in the future, both in future schooling and beyond. Together they provide a more complete picture. So, I suggest that you only mention your ...


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First may I say what a legend your son is. For context, I'm a funded PhD student in the UK and I'm currently VP Lead Cloud Engineer for the central banking and regulatory arm of Barclays Bank (a division known as RFT). I also advise the UK government on national security strategy and countermeasures to cyberwarfare affecting critical infrastructure. At the ...


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Currently a CS PhD student in the US in a highly-ranked program. Anecdotally, there is a student in our department who just started at age 18 and is fully funded. I can't speak to how Canada's departments will view such an application, but I can't imagine it would be any different than here based on my interactions with faculty there. As mentioned in @Pete L....


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I assume you are asking if the two are in competition with one another. Yes, of course, but they are also in competition with everyone else who applies. If the pool is large then there will, potentially, be a lot of very similar applications. It is likely, but not required that they get the same result. Both accepted, or both rejected is more likely than ...


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@Buffy pointed this out in their comment, but allow me to expound on what getting a PhD in the sciences in the U.S. looked like financially. Getting into a PhD program in the US in a well-funded field like biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, mathematics, physical and mental health studies that are funded by the National Institute of ...


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