A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

New answers tagged

2

The general rule for you is that you can ask. It would be good to explain in any request that you need to arrange international travel and that finances are an issue. But the general rule for the university is that they may be very constrained in what they can tell you. There may be rules or agreements about deadlines and about giving out information early,...


1

There is a power dynamic in the application process that any applicant needs to be conscious of. There are only a small number of positions for a large number of applicants, which grows to be a very large number at elite institutions. In other words, there is a significant power imbalance to the detriment of the applicant. The consequence of this is that ...


0

Adding to the 'where are you' question - in many universities in Australia what you would do is apply for entry to a lesser postgraduate degree (eg Graduate Diploma) and, if you got sufficiently high marks, you could switch to the masters program after a year. Are you wanting to do a research masters or a coursework masters? Since it's network engineering, I ...


2

I think the most important thing is that you do well by the standards of your own institution and that you get good letters of recommendation from professors there. Note that standards for a masters degree vary around the world. In some places very little research is required and the degree is based mostly on coursework. The "thesis" might be little more ...


1

what is exactly expected in a masters dissertation by European Universities in pure mathematics? The answer will vary university to university. I suggest you short-list some candidate universities that might accept you and look at their dissertation requirements. Am I expected to prove new results? That's a possibility, but not mandatory. If I am ...


2

Within the UK all degrees will have entry requirements for a course, and I expect this is the same throughout Europe although I suggest you check for yourself. As I dont know the exact situation for the entry, ie university or country, I will answer in general terms. Typical entry requrements are based on a progressive points system, where your previous ...


2

If both of your institutions participate in the Council of Graduate Schools, there's something called the April 15 resolution (cgsnet.org/april-15-resolution) where you don't have to accept an offer until April 15. That way you don't have to feel pressured to accept an offer until you've gotten them. It's still early enough where schools are deciding offers.


1

You can ask, but the most likely answer is that no information can be given. Decisions may not be finalized until near the deadline. There may be regulations that prohibit giving out information to individuals prior to agreed-on dates. Mentioning the other problem does you no good and might possibly do harm. The admissions committee isn't going to disrupt ...


2

Personally, I'd like to say I would ignore such a mistake, and indeed my eyes would likely skip it. But if I noticed it, it would raise my brows. I'd suspect that either you are not using a spell checker on an important document (which would make me think less of you), or you've ignored some warning given to you (and spell checkers in fact do give lots of ...


2

It seems as if you have done all you could. If they won't accept supplementary material, then they won't. I'm not sure about the comment on not reading letters, though. It seems like it would be a flaw in the system as long as the letters are in (readable) English. If you get past initial screening you can raise such thing in interviews or in future ...


1

There are two main causes for incorrect spelling: You made a mistake, a typo, or you didn't know how to spell the word correctly. "mercandising" seems to be a typo. That's much more forgivable. Getting "your", and "you're" wrong would be more of a problem. I did review someone's CV before it was sent out and noticed "wether" was used instead of "whether". ...


1

I don't know any specific expectations in Canada but I doubt the expectations about research experience are very high when applying for a Master. Also you seem to assume that informal experience doesn't count, but it probably does: for instance you could do a small project, e.g. reproducing state of the arts results for a problem of interest and analyzing ...


11

I'll give a different answer, which is deliberately not an answer to the exact question you asked. Can you fix it? Can you overwrite your initial CV on the web application form, or ask the admissions administrator to replace it for you, or something like that? If so, then you should fix it, because you're trying to present your best self with your ...


0

There are currently several questions, I will try to answer: Do you think it's possible for me to be accepted into a master's degree program in psychology? Yes. Very likely, if you look at different universities, you can find a master's degree program in psychology that accepts all applicants who have bachelor's degrees.


1

OP asks, will the spelling error be a "major issue for my application" MAYBE. The spelling error on the first page is evidence that OP might not have read their own paper prior to submission. That is demonstrative of a lack of attention to detail. Whether writing a simple email or important application, take the time to read it at least once to catch ...


3

For those with whom you communicated previously, a follow up is appropriate. But it can be very short and simple. Just say that you have applied and thank them for their help. Add that you remain interested in their research and in working with them in the future. You don't need to remind them of anything. The university procedures will take care of that. ...


6

For the purpose of admissions it's unlikely to have any impact. If this were to support a job application, where a recruiter might have 500 resumes in front of them, and 95% of those resumes end up in the trash after one pass, you want to make every effort to prevent yours from being trashed, and every effort should be put into making sure your ...


63

I'll give the same answer as Allure, but for a very different reason. Not only is it common, but most people won't notice it. And of the few that do, fewer yet would think it an important enough issue to bother with. "Egad, this person misspelled a word. Horrors." Nope, it ain't gonna happen. But, you also need to be assured that no single thing, ...


16

No. Check this paper out. As of time of writing Google Scholar says it's received 3871 citations, which puts it well into the upper echelon of papers. And yet on page 50 there is ... To diagionalize the remaining four dimensions, we transform to a new set of variables Obvious typo, but it's far from uncommon and it doesn't stop people from reading and ...


2

Extended periods on your CV are fine as long as you can explain why they are there. From my understanding, you took as long as you did because you did a full-time undergraduate degree in Mathematics followed by your Masters degree, while still doing TA duties on the side, and then also attempted to do the Psychology degree at the same time. This is a huge ...


1

I was with my group through undergrad and masters. Had funding guaranteed through my professors independent grants. It basically would have been a continuation of what I was already doing. Applied to the PHD and got rejected, it was a shock to everyone. I am still confused what went wrong (GRE score?) but I imagine there was some politics involved since my ...


0

I think, you should build some patience and 3 days is not a long time of waiting. However, various reasons for the delay could be: You may not be only one student. He might be busy in research and administration. He might have traveled for a conference or something. He might have personal reasons for the delay. He definitely has higher priority works than ...


0

It's very hard to say from the information you have given. All you have told us is: You took four times as long as usual to finish a bachelors degree. You are 37. You lack focus. You are currently confused. You managed to get a fairly good mark in one class. Working as a TA in other areas isn't a good reason to stop an undergrad degree. I am ...


0

In most cases it would be foolish to hide it from your advisor. But I don't know them or their personality. Some people would react very badly and others would be very supportive, with every possibility in between. For a vindictive person, you need to be extra cautious. But those folks are fairly rare. One issue you should consider is whether you are ...


4

It's not unheard of for someone to be unable to attend a conference after having their work accepted. This can happen for any number of reasons that may be seen as having varying levels of validity in someone else's eyes, ranging from "death in the family" to "I have better things to do". I don't see a compelling reason to open yourself up to such value ...


1

I see no reason to omit it. I see no reason to have the supervisor write a letter of recommendation either. They are independent things. You want the best letters you can get and they seem to be from others here. You also want to show that you have some research experience even if it wasn't sufficient to result in publication. I assume you mean ...


0

It's true that information about grad school applications (and statements in particular) isn't always easy to find. MIT Grad Blog has a couple of articles that might be helpful: How to Craft a Personal Statement. Some practical tips and perspective The Key to Successful Applications. The qualified match approach to personal statements That said, there ...


2

If it has been accepted then yes, include it, but mark it somehow (... abstract to be presented at ...). If it has been submitted, but not yet accepted, then you can include it under the heading of "work in progress". But there is no reason not to include such things. As you say, deliverables are important. But so is showing some continuity in your ...


0

In the US, I see this more and more. It puts a different flavor on student visits, which have trended towards organized events for a slew of students at once. It means the students can ask questions of a different sort when face to face with faculty members, and the departments work on wooing the good students. It's a horse race. Departments don't want ...


22

Sending offers too late to a very good applicant also involves the risk that the applicant will accept a different offer, and the university will lose out. Very good applicants also tend to receive many offers, so this risk should not be underestimated. Similarly to the case of hiring employees at a company, if a university wants to admit the best students, ...


0

I'm applying for master programs and the 16 selections are range from dream to match to safe, with about five in each category. Please for simplicities' sake, choose your top one out of each category, and save yourself so much time and stress. That would be 3 recommendation letters. If you must, add 1 or 2 backups and have a max of 5 needed letters. If ...


2

"Submitted manuscripts" count less, but are still viewed favorably. Uploading these to a preprint server and stating the preprint number is a plus. The only thing that could look strange are too many "manuscripts in preparation": a committee might wonder if you finish in time what you started.


0

It is unlikely there is any advantage of applying too early, because unlike undergraduate admissions, there is usually no "quotas" to be filled here. Contacting prospective supervisors early, however, is a very good idea. (1) They would give early feedback/pointers given your research statement, (2) They might give you advice if they're not themselves ...


5

I have been on tons of search committees for faculty members, and I would never look at this in a negative light. A submitted manuscript doesn't mean it is substandard work. Conversely, I believe, it means you are an active researcher and have the ability to build a substantial research agenda. I wouldn't worry about this in the least.


6

It's pretty hard to imagine that it would be a problem. More is generally better. And the time to publication for a submission can be long. It seems better that you keep working and submitting rather than waiting for one to complete the process. It shows you are active. Always a good thing.


6

The only likely advantage to applying early is that you won't run into unexpected events that make it difficult to meet the deadline, and that this could improve the quality of your application (especially the written/essay portions) as well as avoid simply failing to meet the deadline at all. That said, this can be a very valuable advantage. You'll find a ...


1

Probably there is very little advantage. Committees are likely to only start considering candidates after the deadline anyway. Likewise not much disadvantage in being close to the deadline as long as you beat it. The committee will be made up (almost) entirely of faculty who want to schedule time and get through the pile of applications.


1

I plan to apply approximately 16 schools and wondering whether they're too many for my recommendation letter providers...It's happened before that a professor of my friend regretted to provide all letters for him because they're too many. You needn't necessarily require a letter to support each application (unless that's strictly required). You may be able ...


-1

Consider how long it will take for your professor to write one great recommendation letter for you. Next, consider how much time it might take your professor to produce 16 fantastic recommendation letters for you. Most people will do a fairly awful job if they feel they are being undervalued or asked to serve unreasonable requests. That you are asking the ...


6

Unlike the other answers, I do not think the professor's time spent customizing is an issue. Customizing a letter does not take that long. Professors have lots of practice. Submitting it can take longer due to low quality submission systems. But writing the first letter is most of the work. The issue is that only one of these letters is worth submitting:...


0

As mentioned in the comments, I do not think that you will be able to find a supervisor who does not know you well already if you have a record of dismissal for plagiarism. You could try: Telling the truth about your dismissal (lying or omitting that you were dismissed would likely be grounds for getting dismissed again). Explaining, with evidence, why it ...


-1

Inform your university’s disability office. They should be able to handle things appropriately. In most OECD countries, there is a law prohibiting discrimination against individuals with disabilities, and obligating workplaces and schools to provide reasonable adjustments. As a result, the universities in those countries will have equity offices who should ...


0

No, nobody needs to know. Your letter writers need to attest to your academic abilities, whereas your medical history is not something they need to know nor do they have any business telling anyone else about it. As a matter of fact, all that ought to matter are your academic abilities. The fact that you're applying for graduate school implies to me that ...


50

As other people have mentioned, the problem with 16 schools is that a professor cannot, either truthfully or operationally provide customized letters to 16 different schools. By "customization" I mean more than changing the name of the school and program. Good letters of rec use professor's familiarity with their field to speak to applicants' specific ...


0

I think you are missing some key text from the prompt. I searched the exact text you did include, and found a prompt posted elsewhere that seems to match. It might not be the exact full prompt you were given, but please read yours carefully. Here's the text I found posted by another applicant here... Bold is added by me. Applicants for our graduate ...


33

Tell your professor of your plan to apply to 16 schools, and let them decide if it’s too much. They are capable of making their own decisions without you doing that on their behalf. It’s nice of you to worry about the professor’s well-being, but unnecessary, and counterproductive if it ends up undermining your own success. And as for the professor ...


3

You can ask him, of course. But the problem with asking for too many is that you will get a general letter sent to all, rather than a letter tailored to each given position. I realize this is hard if all schools have similar deadlines, but if possible you should spread it out over time, with your professor's OK. You can also have a different professor ...


4

"How your perspectives or activities contribute to social or cultural diversity and/or make you sensitive to the experiences of underrepresented groups" I think a useful way to approach this question is to not think about it in terms of race, but instead consider what it means to be socially diverse. As an example, consider this brief response to the ...


-4

This question suggests you are not prepared for doctoral study at the University of California. Sign yourself up for a diversity training program. In my opinion, the prompt is code for "Tell us how you will work effectively with people who are different from you." Answer that appropriately for the context of your discipline, and you will be okay.


3

Use a different referee, time is now not on your side and she did not plan to be sick. If she is not capable of replying to emails she might be very sick so have some respect. You might consider sending her reference late with a note of explanation but I suggest you send the initial application fully complete. Many times the first stage of the sorting ...


Top 50 recent answers are included