199

Actually, it is simple courtesy to accept as soon as you know you will do so. This helps the institution deal with its obligations to you and others. It isn't a game you play for "advantage". You hope to develop a long term relationship with this institution. Treat them with respect and expect them to reciprocate. Don't accept before you are ready, such as ...


196

In research, you don't set out to prove that something is true. You set out to discover whether or not it is true. This would be knowledge. The other is just propaganda. Negative results are not a failure. They give you evidence just as do positive results. If you ignore, or obscure, results you are lying to yourself and others. If you design an "...


176

Will ISIS attacks hurt my PhD application as a Muslim? Only indirectly. Admissions committees have good incentive to get the sharpest, most hard working people into their programs. They will care about your excellent results, as they should. But administrative procedures may hinder people coming from your part of the world more than other applicants. I am ...


156

As noted in the comments, actions committed long ago as a child are (and should be) entirely irrelevant to graduate admissions. It is well understood that children do not have same ability as adults to comprehend the consequences on their actions. As a result, many legal systems wipe a child's record clean of most or all juvenile offenses upon reaching ...


153

A few suggestions: If it were me, I would be very forthcoming about the illness. Of course, no one is entitled to your private medical information, so you will have to decide what you're comfortable with. But "an undiagnosed brain tumor caused me to act erratically" is a very convincing explanation, and does not reflect poorly on you. Consider ...


138

First of all, I’m happy you’re doing better! It would take a truly heartless committee to ignore the circumstances. In the US it’s illegal if I’m not mistaken, but from a recruiter’s perspective I would definitely see the fact that you overcame adversity and managed to graduate with a good GPA as a point in your favor. Mention this in your statement of ...


136

Please feel free to edit the answer to improve it. Can I get into school X with my {grades, test scores, research profile, personal story, etc.}? There is no formula by which we can turn your "statistics" into a probability of admission. Things vary from (sub)field to (sub)field, school to school, year to year, and person to person. If you posted a ...


135

First off, congratulations on being accepted to the PhD. That means the faculty have carefully evaluated your application materials and decided that you are a promising young mathematician. They are experts and they think you have what it takes to finish a PhD. No one gets admitted just because of their gender and/or race. It would be a waste of the ...


133

I had some troubles following your question, but if I understood correctly then I would assume that: The professor interviewing you is highly confused right now. They seem to have literally nothing to do with your university, the program, you (other than having interviewed you recently), and the person that you accused of being unjust - and yet they are ...


131

The benefit of recommendation letters is that they give insight into abilities that are not reflected in the rest of your application. Your grades and your publication are already in your application. A professor who doesn't know anything else about you has nothing to write that will help you. To directly answer your question: it comes across more naïve/...


125

You can ask, but it's really none of your business. Admissions committee deliberations are generally treated as confidential. Asking about the other candidates and why they were rejected will almost certainly be seen as intrusive. It's the kind of thing that's likely to cause them to wonder how they made the mistake of choosing you over all those other ...


115

Leave it blank You don't have to play along with the diversity people, but that doesn't mean there won't be any consequences. Throughout my time in undergrad, the US military, and now grad school, I have steadfastly refused to answer questions about my race. And why should I? My father is from Mexico and is still a dual citizen. As far as I can tell, that ...


112

No. You cannot hide such a fact in US admissions processes. Lying about your previous academic record—whether by omission or by claiming false credentials—is sufficient reason to revoke an offer of admission if it is caught before the applicant matriculates, or grounds to expel a student if caught after enrollment. Depending on the magnitude of the fraud, ...


111

Dude I am an old guy and here is my advice: Never be shy to ask for things you don't know. Accept the fact that you are an imperfect being. You made mistakes, and will make mistakes. Be open to hear others views, and take moment to digest their words to fully understand their perspective. Therefore it is totally normal to email the university back with ...


110

The short answer is that when people want something, they often experience cognitive distortions that prevents entirely accurate assessments. Dunning-Kruger is a good example of one of these effects, where a student thinks, "Oh, I'd love to study in Paris - and lots of people speak French, so I'm sure I could pick it up!" Learning a new language to a college-...


108

There is a very easy solution. Your supervisor can simply write something like To whom it may concern, It is a pleasure to write in recommendation of John Smith (no relation). John is...etc., etc. Sincerely, Professor Tom Smith


106

My sense is that the vast majority would not notice one way or another but that some potential advisors might and would find it intrusive and and inappropriate. In many other cases, (like myself) professors use text-based email clients or systems that that block this kind of tracking. In these cases, folks won't think you're rude but you still won't know if ...


101

Holding a PhD in math would usually disqualify you from being admitted into a PhD program in mathematics. Even if it does not do so officially, I'd consider it next to impossible to get scholarships. That said, being a postdoc in math is not really much different from being a PhD student. However, even being a postdoc forever is not easy. Many funding ...


101

Yes! In fact, I think you're well on your way to doing better than your peers! Taking longer to understand something isn't something to be proud of! There's no need to reinvent the wheel. If someone can help you understand something, you would be well-advised to make use of them. In the same way, you would be well-advised to attend the lectures, thereby ...


97

It seems to be a common fallacy among undergraduate students that completing more majors and/or minors means that you have learned more in college. I think this comes from the mistaken belief that completing the coursework required for a major in a subject means that you have mastered the subject. In actuality, the coursework required for a major in a ...


96

A student who is falsely accused of cheating should follow the official appeal or grievance process, even if they are threatened with retaliation for doing so. To threaten to retaliate if an appeal is made would be blatant misconduct. The student should keep careful records of everything that has happened thus far. Unfortunately the student has no control ...


96

I would take your colleagues advice - but not for the reason he cited. Waiting a few days allows the excitement to die down and stops you from making rash decisions. Perhaps there is some catch in the agreement that you glazed over because you were too interested in the good parts. You've also mentioned that other offers are coming in - waiting allows you ...


94

When I am evaluating a research group leader, one of the most important things I examine is where their former students work. If their former undergraduates have moved to PhD programs at excellent universities, that makes the group leader look like an excellent mentor who teaches their students well. This improves the group leader's reputation and helps ...


92

From what I've heard the NSF fellowship is not an easy one to get, and having one seems to carry some sort of prestige. Sure, the program may have accepted you on the ground that they don't have to pay you, but the fact that you have an NSF fellowship may have changed the admission committee's perception of your ability, which could be what tipped the ...


89

Explore all other options first. Seriously. Talk to professors whom you think to possess some common sense (especially your adviser and the department head if they are among them) explaining clearly what your situation is and what your objectives are and ask for the advice on how to proceed. Resort to the F option only if you see that there is no other way. ...


88

I would recommend the following: Contact the other universities and ask if they might still be willing to admit you (this might be the easiest way out). If the answer is negative make sure to keep their answers for the later points. Write to the university that revoked the offer stating (in a friendly tone) that you turned down other offers due to their ...


87

Focus on facts, rather than your emotional impressions. Don't try to overgeneralize. Say what didn't work for you, rather than imply that it does not work for everyone (unless everyone agrees) or it won't work for the prospective student (who knows...). You could say "I would have chosen differently" (ideally, adding the other possible options) or "overall, ...


87

I am going to just be honest in this response. Why would the researchers at the British university you applied to care about what professors do at another university? If I received an email from an applicant to my university about a matter at another program, I would think it was strange. Why would I care? "Leading mathematicians" at a university ...


84

I can't think of any harm in telling them, and in the medium term, this isn't a secret, because it will certainly be clear by the fall where you've gone since your name will probably be put on the department website. If you're uncomfortable, it's certainly fine to wait a bit until you've finalized things at the school you accepted; you don't even need to ...


83

Omitting negative findings and selectively reporting only the positive findings would be a breach of research ethics. As a researcher you are supposed to uncover knowledge,* not to obscure it. Findings are often contradictory and in need of interpretation. By explaining how you obtained these contradictory results (i.e. your methods), you help others to ...


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