New answers tagged

0

Right now, you will be accepted almost anywhere you apply for a Masters in the UK, so I would definitely suggest looking at the same university level or higher - do not limit yourself. Your first degree is quite relevant to Statistics, which gives you an edge, and besides already holding a Masters shows your level. I am confident you will not have a problem ...


0

I can only speak from a U.S. student's perspective, but I found the canvas model shown above to be motivating when I was a student. Granted, I was usually toward the top of the curve, but that can improve confidence and keep students motivated to perform their best. The students toward the low end are typically the ones who aren't putting any effort into the ...


3

First, as to the overall question about posting information about grade distributions on assignments: I do not do it. More below. Can one do better? Information about quartiles maybe? One problem that you may be trying to solve to give better information to students on how to map a score to a true course grade. In other words, you may be trying to avoid ...


4

I can't speak to whether disclosing the minimum or maximum grade motivates or demotivates anyone, but Canvas, a learning management system (LMS) common in the US, displays a boxplot with mean, IQR and upper/lower bounds. (Image credit to St. Mark's School)


7

I would suggest a mean, a standard deviation and some bands, e.g. Fail (<10), 10 - 15, 15 -20. Quartiles would also help, but two quartiles below the mean are not helpful. That should be more than enough. Personally, I discuss but do not report the percentage that fails and the maximum.


3

I got a 3.46 In general, a 3.46 is reasonably good. Given your otherwise excellent performance, it is not necessary to make excuses or explain. In fact, I recommend not doing so, for two reasons: Grades are only one part of your application. You are clearly a "check" in that box, so there is nothing to gain by dwelling on it. In fact, this is likely to ...


2

I think you can probably safely ignore your first semester grades if you've done much better later. At most a single phrase, somewhere, about quickly learning and recovering from early mistakes is enough. Your latest work is also more advanced and is what most reviewers will look at in most applications. If you don't mention it at all, but are later asked, ...


0

I've done everything correctly, but the grader has frequently marked me down for not including steps in my work which are so obvious I would never, as a grader myself, consider marking sophomores down for passing over them without comment, much less fellow grad students. You may be correct in your approach. However, it does not matter. You simply disagree ...


3

Did you contact the grader directly about the factual incorrectnesses? I had to grade quite a few things already, and sometimes, when there are many students, mistakes happen. (Actually, I even made mistakes when there were few students...). If the grading indeed is wrong, and the grader refuses to change it, then I think you should talk to the prof as you ...


5

Of course, you are perfectly entitled to get graded fairly. Talk to the prof, and when you do, concentrate on the factually wrong grades if they are the substantial part of your complaint, because that's where you can provably address the factual incorrectness of the marking. Make absolutely sure this is really the case; if you get that wrong, people won't ...


1

You're developing a cognitive distortion in regard to your ability. Comparing yourself to another only will increase you anxiety in this respect. I've seen it destroy teachers. One day they're told that they're consumate professionals. Then one observation later they're deemed inadequate and then put under review until they leave because the stress becomes ...


0

However, this class kinda made me think that maybe I am not good enough for this type of theoretical research. Well, maybe you aren't for this type. Isn't that natural? What it does not mean is that you are not good enough for your main field. You are going through something very normal, so a pragmatic approach might be the best one. If you are doing ...


3

I don't know the answer to this question, but I do have some idea for questions you might ask yourself. I would guess that you are doing better in this class than you think you are, and overall you are probably stronger than this particular class indicates. However, the job market is competitive, and I have every expectation that the current crisis will ...


7

What you may be experiencing is the fact that insight into some areas of mathematics don't translate into insight into others. I had a lot of insight into Analysis (my field) and General Topology, but little in Abstract Algebra. I once took a course (grad level) in discrete math and did terribly, experiencing much of what you describe. To be successful you ...


4

The merits of these type of "creative" assignments seems to be up in the air amongst the answers here. However, regardless of how valuable this assignment is towards your education I believe I can give pragmatic advice towards your 3rd question. While I think free-thinking and creativity are great things, I fully understand the stress associated with open-...


9

Although I generally agree with the gist of other answers in respect to "learn to be independent, especially from grades" I strongly disagree about the instructor being right here. As I can read from your other questions and your name, I assume you are German. Since I am from Germany, too, I am a hundred percent sure that everything this lecturer uses as ...


9

I am surprised, or, better said, appalled, by the answers given so far. It looks like the general consensus is that the instructor is right and you should just shut up and comply. I strongly disagree. If this is a technical course, the instructor should only grade technical accomplishment. Extra credit for "creativity" or "humor" are OK, but those are ...


5

Should I communicate this to the lecturer? If you are not sure what the lecturer wants you to do, then yes you should communicate that. I have explicitly asked for fixed deadlines You should be able to set deadlines for yourself, within the limits provided by the lecturer. and a statement about the extent of the project and report (as in, how many ...


49

tl;dr: your lecturer is right in principle. Commit time and effort to your project and try to be creative. In higher education, students are expected to develop the skills which enable them to apply a number of techniques, compare the results, evaluate their effectiveness, synthesise new methods, or even suggest new approaches to a problem. Your lecturer is ...


17

My first impression of what you describe is that the instructor tries to achieve two things: he wants to avoid teaching you to write long reports, which could be a good thing; there are many fields where writing long reports should not be a priority. he is gradually allowing more freedom as students progress through the curriculum. The latter is what I ...


3

I don't think you really need to think in the shoes of the lecturer since finding something creative will solely depend on your delivery of work. Try something that appeals to you rather than trying to guess what their likes are because it will only give you stress on realizing maybe this isn't what the lecturer likes. Plus, you're gonna have a bad time ...


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