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1

There might be some effect but I'd expect it to be small and easily overcome. If you want a largely research position grades will be mostly irrelevant and you will be judged on the quality (and maybe quantity) of your research. But even if you want a teaching position, you may have some insight into the troubles and travails of students that might serve you ...


4

In my experience, it will have minor to none implications. Job interviews barely talk about failed exams, if they even pose a question about your studies at all, they focus on what you put your focus on. You could check your Prüfungsordnung or get in touch with the Studienbüro, if they actually include the amount of failed attempts in your Abschlusszeugnis. ...


3

Since you have not provided enough details in your question I will go with a generalised answer to this end. The answer to this question, however, is country- and organisation-specific. Further, it does also depends on the PhD advisor herself. I am in academics for a few years now and I have seen some post-grads (not PhD) who do/did have bad grades during ...


0

Depends - but I feel if you can convincingly communicate why you want the PhD position you are applying for, I doubt your undergrad grades are going to be detrimental. Also, I recon this differs a lot from country to country and field of research.


2

This is exactly the sort of situation that a reference letter should address. Find a referee, perhaps the lecturer for that subject, who can credibly say that your results don't truly reflect your ability and explain why. (Of course, as other posters have suggested, you can also explain the situation in your own statement. But this might look a bit defensive,...


0

How were your GRE scores? If they were great, you can write off that one bad grade, maybe even show semester-by-semester Marks to prove it’s an outlier. If your GRE scores were poor, there’s a chance it will be seen as confirmatory that your poor grade was diagnostic.


2

I can relate to your situation, as Johanna stated above, it is normal to feel like you might not be on par with other applicants. As far as lower than desired GPA, or any other factor that you may be holding you back, one of the things that the Ivy Leagues (and other schools in the US for that matter) generally require for PhD admissions is a statement of ...


2

I believe it is very normal to have some drawbacks in every university experience, especially in the situation you described. I believe most people would be understanding if you explained to them what caused that specific grade (the changing masters and countries, etc), and I would explain how you are improving (extra hours of study, asking for advise of ...


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