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10

It is extremely unlikely that anyone would care, especially a source of funds. They are interested in you research potential and your productivity. There might be various aspects to that for specialized awards, but no one will ask you for your doctoral level transcripts. They are largely meaningless in any case. If you passed comprehensive exams then you ...


8

Since you're specifically asking about the situation in Germany, here are a few remarks that might be interesting for you (although the main point of these remarks is that it is essentially impossible to answer the question at the given level of generality). Admission rules at German universities depend on various things: for instance, the specific ...


5

There are no formal requirements on how GPA is calculated and reported in one's CV unless you are filing an application to a particular company that has articulated such rules (which I have not heard of). Such rules usually exist during the admission process to the universities (especially many caveats and intricacies are present for grades conversion in the ...


3

Medical issues, especially during your earlier years, are worth explaining in your SOP BUT it's not worth making an extra statement/essay. You don't want to be overdramatic with it, rather maybe a line or two in the sense of the whole SOP/application. GPA is a bit low, but you have a strong upward trend, plus all the issues were in your earlier years so ...


3

A good GPA, etc, will give evidence that you work hard. That won't be an issue in the new field. But the admissions process/committee will need some assurance that you have the necessary prerequisite courses and knowledge in that new field or can quickly pick that up. That will weigh more heavily, perhaps. So, other things, such as the indicated research, ...


3

At that level, the only value for which there will be no issue is perfect marks, usually 4.0. But admissions, especially for top students to top schools doesn't work like that. More is considered than just GPA. Otherwise there would be no need for admissions committees. You need a good, but balanced, application. And at the level you are speaking of, once ...


2

I have doubts that it will matter. The reasons for taking a pass might be obvious to a reader. Letting the numbers fall where they may might seem more honest. But also consider that few (if any) programs will automatically exclude you for GPA alone. People are admitted into doctoral programs based on many things, none of which (other than dishonesty, perhaps)...


2

The things hindering you would be both your level of preparation in required subjects and the level of competition in any place that you apply to. If you are missing certain courses then you can probably use non-degree status to make up and get a formal transcript. For repeating courses you have, it might work out as well, provided that you do much better. ...


2

You only have one year of grades. That is not many grades at all. You said most of the grades are not from classes related to the internship. We do not know what exactly the labs are looking for or who else is applying, so we cannot predict if you will get an internship. But if you do not get what you want, it will probably be due to lack of experience ...


2

Your older work is far less important than what you have done since. If you have turned it around and people are willing to attest to that in letters of recommendation the first year will likely hurt you very little. I can't say not at all, but not as much as you fear. For future stuff, focus on the future and on what you have learned enables success there. ...


2

The linked duplicate question answers your query regarding applications in the US. This answer will address the UK situation. In the UK, if you haven't graduated and got your final mark yet, your offer of a PhD place and funding will almost certainly be conditional on you finishing your degree with a certain grade. They may specify a certain GPA you need to ...


1

Actually, reputation matters. If a college were to give out uniformly high grades then they would pretty soon not be trusted. And organizations that do "ranking" would be pretty savvy about such things. It would also be pretty hard for a university to manage such a thing, since grades are given by individual professors with individual preferences ...


1

I don't think there is any rule that would suggest it's bad practice to add the scorecard to your unofficial transcript. However, I would say that it is unlikely to change much. If you think it is important to address the grades, I'd rather find a way to weave this into the letter or any other free text that will accompany your application. This is likely a ...


1

An application for grad study in the US contains many elements, of which GPA is only one. If the GPA is poor, then the other elements need to indicate a high likelihood of success in graduate study and thereafter. Research experience (published papers especially) is a good indicator. And in the US, the letters of recommendation from people who know you well ...


1

they have no restriction intakes , Why they do that ? Caveat: I'm in germany and in a STEM field. Many European countries have rather open admission systems for university, in particular if the program is not overcrowded. These programs in turn tend to have high failure rates at exams. The philosophy behind this is that everyone should get their chance, ...


1

It's not clear what you consider to be a low grade, or whether you are already in the UK. This answer assumes that you have a low 2:1 (i.e. 60%-65%) and have obtained your degree(s) in the UK. If your highest qualification is a BSc, you can compensate for a low overall mark by one or more of the following: Get a Master's degree (preferably a research-based ...


1

Disclaimer: I will try to answer more generally, hence some of the examples will not apply. I have no experience in journalism. Over the years, for graduate school applications in hard sciences, prior research experience became almost a requirement at the higher level of applicants. These usually present itself as a project done before the application and ...


1

Should I make use of it and explain that this was "the coronavirus semester" in my application package, or am I dooming myself by converting my grades from percentage into CRs? You shouldn't have to explain that it was "the coronavirus semester" (though it probably doesn't hurt to mention it, I guess), but more importantly, you also aren't dooming yourself ...


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