Hot answers tagged

162

There's no way to know how someone will react to a given situation but I would suggest to at least have a reason if you are challenged. For instance, it might be reasonable to supply the same number of digits that they are asking for. If they ask for a 2.5 minimum GPA, then you report a 2.5, if they ask for a 2.50 then report a 2.50, but if they ask for a 2....


85

Simple: a graduate degree (esp. PhD) is about research. GPA doesn't measure research ability to any extent.


53

The PhD is a ~6 year degree, and most classes are in the first year or two. As others have said, the classes are really incidental; the PhD is about doing original research. There is also the question of normalization: GPAs must be interpreted in terms of the subject, the quality of the school in that subject, and the student's specialization. Given this, ...


49

The most likely motive is your recruiter believes PhD GPAs are as relevant as undergrad GPAs. My guess is this recruiter has a plethora of office jobs and doesn't usually work with academics. It is perfectly acceptable to tell the recruiter you're not interested in working with them


48

What is the clever thing to do when one finds such regulations in own University which can be used on one's own good?!? I'm so glad you asked. The clever thing would be to realize that the best way to raise your GPA is to do excellent work in all your courses. Aside from being the optimal strategy GPA-wise, this has the fringe benefit that it is the only ...


38

You probably want to read about significant figures. The premise of significant figures is that only so many additional digits mean anything. Depending on how many digits others want to see your GPA at, yes it is ethical to round a 2.498 to a 2.5. It's well known that GPA isn't a precise predictor of any kind of future achievement, otherwise your ...


36

I'd hold off on your conspiracy theories as to why the GPA is computed the way it is. You are entitled to a grade computed in an accurate and transparent manner, but if you go into this process assuming the university is out to get you, you're going to have a bad time. (Note that from your terminology, I think that your university system may be different ...


28

TL;DR: Probably not worth it. Take something else and expand your horizons. From a knowledge perspective, you're not getting anything out of this. You got an A- in the course -- on a transcript, that should tell any graduate school that you understand the material in the course. So any potential gain here would be for your GPA. On a 4.0 scale, an A- is a 3....


24

There are widely accepted standard rounding rules: any number greater than or equal to 3.35 should be rounded up to 3.4. There is no reason to expect that an application would want non-conventional rules for rounding GPAs.


23

As an admissions-committee person for an R1 math dept, this would look to me like an obsessive-compulsive waste of time. For most people the years they're in undergrad school are an enormous transition, and things that happen freshman year are (hopefully, and, mercifully) not strongly related to what happens later. People understand this, and often look ...


23

Professors will say no by default to all such requests, but a lot of the time they secretly want to say yes, so you need to help them help you by providing all the relevant context, being logical and reasonable, and generally convince them that you are worthy of their attention and understanding. Here is my attempt at a draft email. Dear Professor xyz, my ...


21

One more point: in some cases, a graduate course may be simply an opportunity for students to attend a series of advanced lectures on a particular topic. There may not be any homework, exams, papers, or coursework at all. In such cases a grade will be assigned more or less arbitrarily, perhaps just an A for every student who showed up to most of the ...


19

I would not include such a statement in your CV, since Latin honors are normally awarded at graduation. Until you have actually received the honors, don't list it in your CV. (Moreover, putting "eligible for magna cum laude" or the equivalent makes it look like you're trying too hard to list extra prizes, which reflects poorly on you.)


19

The problem with GPA as a measure is that it just mixes together a bunch of different classes indiscriminately. Consider these three different students: This student is pretty steady, but not great, and tends to get an even mix of As and Bs across all of their classes, obtaining a 3.5 GPA. This student always takes the class with the easiest grading policy ...


19

I would actually consider doing this a negative. One of the things I noticed when I started my PhD work is that the transition from undergraduate work can be a harsh one. Expectations soar, all of your peers are just as good at this as you are, and most importantly, grades become less important than learning to execute good research. Time and stress ...


19

I'm going to guess that you won't be able to convince them, no matter what you say. I think the rule that they imposed is very strict, but not unreasonable. They may have done so as a goad to get you to work early and often on assignments, rather than to let things go to the last moment. They may have done it simply to aid their own workflow in grading and ...


18

No. It is not worth it. If I were reading your application, the difference between a 3.85 and 3.90 would be invisible. If I caught you repeating a freshman course you'd already gotten a decent grade in, I'd peg you as a tunnel-visioned gradegrubber and look for excuses not to admit you. On the graduate level, gradegrubbers are usually Not Admired. ...


18

I've been that professor several times. Much to my own chagrin, there often is no such thing as "the current grade". On a typical day during a typical semester, there are scores for homeworks, quizzes, midterms and whatever other assessments have been completed so far, and there is a formula in the syllabus that computes a "final score" from all the ...


17

No. Just report the GPA as it is listed on your report / certificate.


17

(I am a tenured professor in the math department at UGA who was on the committee that did graduate admissions for four years.) If we have to make a choice, then math graduate programs definitely care more about your math GPA than your undergraduate GPA. We also care, equally, that you take the most challenging and graduate-preparatory math courses that can....


16

Yes, this is near-universal in the United States. Dissertations are not graded, and the GPA includes only course grades. For the most part, people do not care about course grades in Ph.D. programs once you've completed your dissertation. The GPA is understood to refer only to courses, so the GPA is also not considered important. In particular, it is not ...


16

I believe that there cannot be any single numerical statistic or small set of such statistics that summarizes the nature of a student well. The first reason for my assessment is that there are too many different ways one may wish to use information about a student, and too many ways that a student can have an unusual background that will not fit into those ...


16

I doubt an employer would perceive you rounding to 2.5 as unethical. However, you need to be aware of how they are using that information. If you are interviewing for some government or academic appointment, 2.49999 is not "at least 2.5" and could disqualify you from a bureaucratic technical standpoint. If that's the case, you could end up getting fired. ...


15

Not every STEM Master's program is going to be easier to get into than every PhD program, but on the whole they are easier. Universities are much more likely to take you if you're paying your own way (aka. a Masters) than if they have to fund you. In the US it's common for students who didn't do so well in undergrad or are from a lesser known international ...


14

In general it is difficult to tell whether a PhD student is a good researcher or not right after finishing his/her degree. Good results could come from a helping advisor, a lucky topic, or good office mates. Bad results could come from bad luck, lousy preparations of the topic before the student toke over, and so on. GPA is at least somewhat objective. By ...


13

There is no clear answer for conversion between grading schemes in different countries. Sure, you could numerically try to convert using ratios and proportions as you are currently tying to do but they don't really mean anything because of the following two salient reasons: Grade Inflation and Deflation: Grades mean differently in different institutions ...


12

If you write GPA: 3.5 in your CV, this implies that your official cumulative GPA as per university records is a 3.5. So to write this is misleading, and unethical. If you want to list your GPA only for courses in your own department, you can write Major GPA: 3.5 or 3.5 GPA in physical science courses


11

I realize that you mainly mention translating grades between Spain-UK-USA but the final statement of your question is about converting grades in general, so that's what I will refer to. Most countries have their own system which doesn't really make sense as you try to "translate" them to some other system. For example in Sweden two grading systems exist ...


11

As you have already done Masters and PhD, your CGPA in undergraduate is least to be bothered. If you are in academia, your quality of research matters more than the grades that you have obtained long back in undergraduate studies. As your credential will grow, your resume will be filled with much more valued contents rather than just grades.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible