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24

Don't overthink it. Both "Dr." and "Dr.rer.nat." would be OK, "PhD" would be inaccurate. The key information is the line in your CV where you point out that you have completed your doctoral degree. (As relevant context: I am a native German speaker and have experiences in Germany both as a selection committee member and as a ...


7

In English, "Dr." means you completed your PhD. In English, anyone who has completed a PhD is entitled to be called "Doctor", regardless of the subject that they'd completed their degree in. Whether that degree is in IT, Physics, English Literature, or Underwater Basket Weaving, if you've completed a PhD, you're entitled to be called &...


5

Well, yes, but also no. Permanent academic positions that are not professorships are relatively rare in Germany. Since most researchers want to eventually have a permanent position, it is in the interest of all long-term researchers to eventually become "berufungsfähig" (suitable for becoming a tenured associate or full professor). The vast ...


4

You can ask, of course. But if the description states that it is in German, then you probably won't see a change. There may be others in the course depending on it being in German, of course. But giving the professor a heads up that you are having a lot of trouble following because of language issues might possibly result in some accommodation.


3

It is typical to refer to people having some kind of doctorate as "Dr FirstName LastName" in British academia. Note that there is no dot after the "Dr", American usage may wary. For example, look at the staff list of my department here: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/staff/science/compsci/ A Dr rer nat is a perfectly fine doctorate, and in ...


2

This question is very difficult to answer in general as PhD programs and their rules are hardly standardized in Germany, every university can mostly do as they please. In my research institute (STEM) PhD students are employed workforce and as such your contract cannot start before you present yourself to HR at least once in person. But this does not seem to ...


2

You are getting an offer from an elite institution in the middle of a pandemic. The job market right now is absolutely awful. I can appreciate that you want only the absolute best for your future, but the way you sketch this situation hardly sounds like a dilemma at all. Additionally, as soon as you manage to publish a paper or two on the project on which ...


2

Just to add to Arno's reply: Academic titles are not controlled by law in the UK. It is generally considered that those holding a substantive doctoral degree are entitled to be called Dr, and that non-surgical medical practitioners are called Dr by courtesy, but this is custom, not law. The National Health Service, for example, refuses to accord genuine ...


2

rumtscho, Dr. rer. nat. (CS) Does that work for you? If you were to move to the US, or some other English speaking countries, Dr. rumtscho would probably be enough. But if you remain in Germany/Austria... then it might be best to keep it formal and as awarded. Especially so if you are writing to a German organization. The English speakers will just have to ...


1

But how precisely am I supposed to give the topic of my doctoral thesis? Is it sufficient to have a broader view of the topic and themes the working group is dealing with or is it necessary to formulate the concrete topic of my planned thesis? In general, most hiring PIs will want to see that you have "done your homework", that is, you have a good ...


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