If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

New answers tagged

-3

Going forward, I would advise that you simply choose your gender status as non-binary or choose the “prefer not to say” option on applications. Academic institutions are moving towards a model of racial and gender equity in programs and unfortunately that means that you might not be considered as valuable to the program because of your sexual orientation, ...


-1

It depends on your local laws of course, but if it can be proven that you were discriminated against because of your gender, there's a good chance it was unlawful. Related question I asked on the Law StackExchange. The law cited is for Australia, and the relevant section is Section 21, which explicitly prohibits "educational authorities" from refusing or ...


10

It is possible you were unfairly rejected. This is not really possible to prove one way or the other, from the information in your post. Unrelated to that, however, your post shows a lack of understanding for the standard justifications of affirmative action, and why admissions committees sometimes may try to improve the gender balance of their decisions. I ...


2

The is a degree of randomness to these processes and factors that are unknown or not described in your post. Think of any logistic regression model that you might have seen. Some proportion of those predicted to be 1 actually are 0 and vice versa. It could be due to an excluded variable but it could be random. Are you both proposing to work with the same ...


14

I have had people I know who are senior mathematicians tell me in private conversation that they believe it is right and proper to discriminate in favor of females in mathematics in things like graduate admissions and job hiring. In some cases they essentially admitted (in a circumspect, plausibly-deniable sort of way) to practicing this kind of ...


-3

Discrimination is when an under-represented group is excluded from an opportunity. Nearly everyone agrees that is unfair. Affirmative action is when an over-represented group is excluded from an opportunity. This is your situation. Some people think that affirmative action creates justice because it compensates for unfair discrimination by resulting in a ...


6

The comparison you make is quite compelling, insofar as you both went to the same school, and have conducted similar tests/classes in your respective CVs, and there is no aspect (that you have mentioned) where her record is stronger than yours. I would recommend you take a careful look to see if there are any aspects of your girlfriend's CV that are ...


5

Interesting that all of the responses so far seem to be from men. I believe that the extreme gender-skew among math and physics cranks is the flip side of the cult of genius, which is deeply entrenched in mathematics and theoretical physics, and also heavily gendered. "Genius" in the sense of having brilliant insights into an abstruse field is almost ...


5

"Old men" have a lot of accumulated knowledge and experience, and have usually developed a lot of wisdom. We can often look at a situation, immediately know what superficial details to ignore, and then quickly assemble and analyze the fundamentals. Unfortunately, we sometimes look at situations outside of our expertise, where our knowledge is less than it ...


4

Old men in general don't work anymore, which means They have plenty of time on their hands. They don't have employers/ bosses/clients/subordinates anymore for which they have to behave (normally)


2

Perhaps there is something psychometrics can tell here. I suggest it here as a possible perspective into the question. This wikipedia article claims: Previous research has found evidence that most adults become more agreeable, conscientious, and less neurotic as they age. with this reference. And it further claims For example, women consistently ...


52

In order to assess this claim, it is important to first bear in mind that classification as a “crank” theory actually requires a reasonably high level of technical development. For example, in the linked article on trisection of an angle, it actually takes quite a bit of skill and work even to come up with a plausible-sounding false theory of how to do it. ...


15

I am the academic referred to in the following answer by Schiphol: She edited her preprints to use her correct name. In the new preprints she adds a header with the reference to the published version (in the APA style, which is common in her field and also only uses initials of first names). Posted them to the relevant preprint service (PsyArXiv, in ...


13

At the journal PLOS One, we have “republished” papers if someone changes their name as part of a transition. This will replace the name on a paper completely without changing doi or anything else about the paper, and should subsequently also be picked up by indexing services. We have been doing this on a case-by-case basis as a way of reducing any negative ...


10

Traditionally, journal publications are archived "as is" and in immutable form. There was no way to change names or, in fact, anything else -- and that was the point of it. But publishers are understanding that this might be harmful to authors who are in exactly your situation. Some are starting to address this. For example, the Association for Computer ...


37

I know of one theorist who did the following: She edited her preprints to use her correct name. In the new preprints she adds a header with the reference to the published version (in the APA style, which is common in her field and also only uses initials of first names). Posted them to the relevant preprint service (PsyArXiv, in her case). PsyArXiv has ...


5

In the version control system "git", there is the possibility to "rebase" a history - this corresponds to a rewrite of history. However, it is always warned to use it on private histories and to avoid doing so when a history has been published, because it creates endless confusion. Same here - do not rewrite history after publication; in the best case it ...


14

The published articles/books cannot be edited after publication. Therefore, if a published work contains an error, the only solution is to publish an erratum or even retract it. However, the original publication will still exist. We need to think of a publication as a part of a physical object (i.e. a book) which is distributed all over the world with an ...


24

By design, published works cannot (generally) be edited after publication, since doing so would corrupt the record of those works. (There are some exceptions.) New works can be published under an existing or new name. (Younes explains how to create a relation between an existing name and a new name. I'm unsure whether that's in scope or even desirable, ...


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