Hot answers tagged

98

When responding to emails to people I have not met, I usually copy the name from the signature and add "Dear" in front.


93

The BBC has posted an article stating: Goran Hansson, head of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, said they want people to win "because they made the most important discovery... not because of gender or ethnicity" It goes on further: "It's sad that there are so few women Nobel laureates and it reflects the unfair conditions in society, ...


83

First, I think it may be useful to note that in academic collaborations where folks haven't met in person, misgendering often happens even to people who are not trans, due to ambiguity and cultural differences (e.g., "Jean", "Kinjal", "Xue Yi"). As such, you don't even need to bring up your trans status if you don't want to: ...


58

Just keep looking and don't get discouraged (Most male academics can behave themselves around pretty ladies) I suppose this shows the kind of spectrum of variation that men have when encountering an attractive woman in a professional setting. Some men exhibit their romantic interest (sometimes to an extent that is unwelcome), and some go to the complete ...


52

For a salutation in communications written in English, I would suggest using: Dear F. Doe, or Dear Foo Doe, These salutations seem pretty gender-neutral (gender-inclusive) and sound natural to my ear. They avoid any assumptions on the gender or title of the applicant. This is probably close to the form that you are currently using already. Justification ...


44

I'm sorry you're in this spot, and through no fault of your own what-so-ever. I wish there was an obvious answer, but here's a few thoughts: Look for a female mentor. This may be hard depending on your field and country, since many academic departments skew male. Even if you find someone who isn't directly related to your area of interest, they may be ...


41

My favorite podcast, Good Christian Fun, switched their intro from “ladies and gentlemen” to “friends and folks.” I think having an “and” in there helps with the rhythm, and feels better than “everybody.” If friends is weird in class you could try something like “students and scholars”? I realize these are all a little cheesy, but so is the original ...


36

Would it be possible to send an introductory email, as you don't know some of these people yet? Something along the lines of: Dear project participants, I was brought into the project by X because I have worked on subject Y. If you have any questions about my work, please feel free to contact me. Looking forward to working with you, Kind regards OP (she/...


33

I just use the word everybody. Hello everybody. Or This algorithm, everybody, was only discovered... Suits all cultures, genders and is universal without offending. (perhaps a question for English Usage SE really)


30

One of the underrated issues is the fear of accusations. If the male advisor would be accused of sexual misconduct by a female student, especially one that's not unattractive, everyone would believe her and his career would be over. It is really difficult to never meet with your advisor one on one in places without audiovisual monitoring. And even if advisor ...


30

Actually, most such phrases are little more than a "clearing of the throat" and can be eliminated altogether. They introduce a pause, but little more. Phrases like "by the way" or "as a matter of fact" or "as is well known" serve the same purpose. If you really want to draw attention to a point, be more explicit. "...


21

No, that would be ridiculous as well as wrong. Is there "female science" and "male science" and never the twain shall meet? Would you only select male reviewers for "male authored" papers? Black for black? Handicapped for handicapped? If you think there is bias in reviews then you might consider double blind reviewing. And, you ...


20

First, even in cases where you feel you can guess the gender, I suggest you to avoid using Mr or Ms because, first, there are exceptions that are easily misgendered and, second, you don't know the pronoun of the recipient. As an example of the former, Andrea in my country is a masculine name whereas in other countries is feminine. Many an Andrea has been ...


18

Here are some ideas: "Ladies and gentlemen and gentlepeople" "Gentlefolk" "Dear/esteemed students" "All ye who attend my class" "Friends and folks" or "Students and scholars" (as suggested by @Noah Snyder) "People of any and all variety" "Thou bunch of remarkable renegades" &...


16

Since you don't think that there is anything malicious going on, let me suggest that one of the best ways to educate someone who knew you as male is to go visit them - any excuse will do. If they knew you "in person" in a previous life then that picture sticks in their head. Old habits can die hard, especially in older people or people with a lot (...


16

There is evidence that female academics do more service work than male academics. If you select certain manuscripts and only ask female academics to review them, you will be increasing the amount of unrewarded service work performed by female academics. This seems likely to make it harder for female academics to succeed in their careers.


15

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.


12

Let me note something that the other answers seem to have ignored. You describe the things that have been your experience in the past, up to now. But you are moving to a new situation and you have some power to arrange the parameters of that, since you have a stellar academic reputation. Don't, for example, assume that you can't change institutions, or even ...


10

This sounds like a great scheme to undermine the credibility of papers authored by women, which if your policy suggestion is implemented, will now be seen as not carrying the stamp of legitimacy of having been reviewed by reviewers picked “just based on expertise and past review quality”. In other words, this is the exact opposite of “supporting female ...


10

If you are concerned about a bias from reviewers related to the gender (or any other issue), as an editor, why not rather push instead for a double-blind review process? That way, you kill biased reviews at the root by making it impossible to know which gender the authors of a paper actually have.


7

As you may imagine, there's no silver bullet for your situation. My best suggestion is to use the advice of trusted friends and colleagues, as well as sites such as Rate my Professor to establish a list of advisors with whom it may be worth contacting for mentoring your research. Your network can also be expanded by doing conferences, volunteering to help ...


6

You've said that you want emphasis. How about this? This algorithm, was only discovered 30 years ago: now, why do you suppose that was? Addendum: I had forgotten my Shakespeare: he solved the problem in the Prologue to Henry V. this algorithm, gentles all, was only discovered 30 years ago


6

The question asks whether the Nobel Foundation has said anything about the gender ratio. As far as I am aware, they have not. However, that's probably not the right question to ask. The foundation itself is not involved in the process of selecting the laureates, so it is more useful and relevant to look for statements from the different Nobel committees or ...


5

If you have an interest in scientific fraud, I recommend the retractionwatch.com blog. E.g., they covered the study "Males Are Overrepresented among Life Science Researchers Committing Scientific Misconduct" by Fang, Bennett & Casadevall (2013): Of the 72 faculty members found to have committed misconduct, only 9 were female, or one-third of ...


1

fellow human beings fellow contestants in the game of life fellow travelers on starship Earth


1

This sounds horrible. Sorry this has happened to you. The best solution would probably be an email from the academic who misgendered you. How well do you know this person? Would you feel comfortable contacting them, very gently pointing out their mistake, and asking them if they would send a correction to the list? As I say, this is probably very depedent on ...


1

A small auxiliary, perhaps practical, answer. The context for my comments is that I've been in academic math in the U.S., at research-oriented places, for almost 50 years... though in earlier years I did not think in terms of the explicit or implicit biases in the milieu. And, yes, such nasty craziness is all too common. My point would be that some "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible