Hot answers tagged

361

You don't say where you're going to school but if it's here in the US, I would report the problem to the university and demand they do whatever is necessary to fix it. Title IX requires them to provide an inclusive environment free of sexual harassment. If you are unsatisfied by their response, I would report the school to the U.S. Department of Education’...


261

Mind your own business. If you believe that your colleague poses an actual threat to someone, it is of course your duty to warn them. But opinions are not threats. It is entirely up to your colleague who he shares his opinions with. Revealing your colleague's opinions to his future employer, no matter how offensive you may find them, would be a violation ...


256

the new faculty should be female in order to help address the wildly disproportionate gender ratio in our current faculty. This is not a good reason. Gender imbalance is fought by educating everybody (males, females and any possible group) equally and hiring the best people, regardless of their gender, not choosing people by gender; that's sexism. The ...


186

How infeasible is transitioning as an early-career faculty member? I transitioned as a postdoc back in 2013, so I did it. Whether or not it's a terrible idea depends on many factors, and just plain luck. I don't have experience in industry, so I can't comment much on that. But I'm sure it's the same situation: it depends on many factors, and plain luck. ...


182

"We encourage all participants - male and female" There is no need to look into it further than that. They encourage you to come and you want to go. I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to apply.


168

If there is a local Women in Computing or Women in Science and Engineering group you may be able to get face-to-face support and advice. Failing that, I suggest joining Systers. Even if you get suggestions you find helpful here, it may be a better forum for discussion with others who have handled similar problems. I don't have direct experience because ...


164

Is it an option to ask M Smith if she would be ok if the first citation were to read as the following? Smith, M. (published G.) 2014, recent advances in foo, international journal of foo sciences 12:56, 427-865 This would eliminate the only reason I can think of for misgendering the person, namely that readers might be unsure whether they are looking up ...


163

As a reviewer, you are supposed to comment on academic value and scientific correctness of the manuscript. As a woman, you feel unhappy about authors not guessing a correct pronoun for you and not using an appropriate gender-neutral pronoun. It seems that the issue has nothing to do with the manuscript and hence you are not reacting with your reviewer hat ...


160

My view is that her gender does not/should not change anything in how I supervise her or what I expect from her, the rationale being that doing so might ultimately hurt her in her post-PhD career. For this reason, I have not brought up her gender in any of our discussions. I briefly contemplated telling her that I will treat her the same way as her male ...


160

It's your decision what to write, but to my mind, adding a note trying to explain your preferred pronouns seems like it puts the emphasis on something which you probably don't want to make the focus. I'm young enough to be fairly familiar with this stuff, but I have to be honest, the thing I'd remember after read your paper would be "Huh, I've never seen ...


155

I've found that some non-native English speakers use he for they, because that's how they'd do it in their mother tongue. Perhaps mention in your response (alongside any other language/style/etc.) issues: Use they, rather than he, when the person's gender is unknown. From chat: Most native English speakers over a certain age were taught that the use ...


154

From what you've said, it doesn't sound like a sexism issue specifically, but it might have come off that you regarded her sabbatical as a vacation rather than serious work. You might be worrying about this a bit too much--she's probably already forgotten the exchange.


153

One of the primary goals of citing literature is to help others find that literature. Citing a paper differently than it exists in a journal is antithetical to this goal. Unless Smith changes George to Mary on the article you are citing, you should cite it as it exists.


149

If you write such an open letter and she is hired, there is a risk that rumor will spread that she was only hired because she is female and your open letter will help substantiate that rumor. Such rumors are harmful even if she was clearly hired on merit alone. So consider the possibility that your letter does more harm than good. And, if you do write such ...


143

(edited this answer to consider some points raised in the comments and try to address OP more constructively) Yes, it is acceptable for a professor to work to counter the effects of gender discrimination. Yes, it is acceptable for a professor to warn a male-predominant class to not discriminate against women by giving them the "easy" tasks. The professor ...


137

I actually agree with you completely. I think that the women only conference concept is very well intentioned but in practice kind of terrible. I once went to an all girl hackathon and spent 2 1/2 hours not making anything and instead watching everyone pat themselves on the back for being women. Had to sit through a ton of self congratulatory "Ted Talks" ...


136

What's wrong with a sensible answer: "No, I teach Chemistry."


129

I like to think I have a pretty vivid imagination, so the worst thing I can reasonably imagine happening is that you would be seen as trying to perform an experiment with human participants without proper controls, questionable experimental design, possibly a lack of appropriately rigorous analysis (if this isn't your specialty), and lack of ethical review ...


123

Yes, you are definitely welcome to attend. Looking at previous workshops in the "Young Women in..." series, you can see from the photos that some of the participants appear to be male.


122

First of all, acknowledge for yourself that what you're going through is 100% not OK, and you have every right to be upset and looking for a fix ASAP. I start saying this because very often, with any sort of bullying/harassment, people will say "you're overreacting" or "wow, it's not such a big deal, come on", but in fact they are completely wrong. It's ...


118

This is similar to the person of color getting stopped by the police. Is it just a random stop, or is it racism? Very hard to tell without statistics on large sample sizes, or direct evidence of racism. Would the student have made the same accusations if you were male? Possibly, but very hard to tell without direct evidence of sexism. The student could be ...


117

I would simply reply: Dear Student, thank you for your email -- I really appreciated it -- but in the future please avoid addressing professors in an unprofessional way, like "lass" or "lad".


117

Personally, I would address it in a friendly way, but one that makes it clear that you think it's a bit of an odd form of greeting. It doesn't sound like it was intended in an unfriendly or disrespectful way (and I definitely wouldn't characterise it as sexist), but it does sound inappropriately overfamiliar (it would be a bit like one of my students ...


117

I would hesitate to draw any conclusions whatsoever from one semester. File this away, and check whether it becomes a pattern, and if it does then think about it then when you have more information. Although there's not a single incident that you're aware of, I wouldn't be at all surprised if something being "amplified among a group of students" is exactly ...


116

I don't know if a meeting at which you "set the agenda" would be particularly helpful at this stage. It might make him feel "attacked", put him on the defensive, and he may retaliate against you in response. (I'm not suggesting that he would try to get you kicked out of the university or the department; there are many, many other small and large ways an ...


115

Unlike my answer here, your problem does not seem to be about the clothing, but rather the disruption. Assuming the student is not breaking the university dress code, then it is not her who is disrupting the teaching environment, but other students. You have not provided examples of how the response of the other students is disrupting the teaching ...


114

There is no way to do this in a professional way. First of all, if he has been admitted already, it is too late to blow the whistle. Unless what you are revealing is a criminal offence, changing idea and refusing to give him a position to which he has been accepted is legally impossible. Secondly, sending an e-mail or contacting the hiring committee out of ...


112

This sets off all kind of red flags. In the absence of an extremely good rationale, this is very strange and entirely unacceptable. I would recommend that you make an appointment with your graduate program director and discuss the situation ASAP. That person will have more background about the situation and more perspective, and can offer you better advice ...


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