Hot answers tagged

5

I have had a scholarship in Germany where the letters (their offer and my acceptance letter) together were the actual contract. A scholarship in Germany is a mostly one-sided contract: the funding agency grants the scholarship. There are almost no strings attached for the recipient of an academic scholarship since the purpose of the scholarships is ...


5

Caveat: A US view, and there are exceptions even here as noted below. There will, I think, always be an "agreement" even if it isn't a formal contract. It probably isn't something that is negotiated, with the student having any say. But accepting such a scholarship is a formal agreement to abide by some set of rules, that may be just statements of policy ...


2

EDIT: Answer not updated for changed question. Yes, the letter often functions as a contract. If the position is unionized, the contract between the union and the university applies to the person who accepts the letter. This is not legal advice, and this is not the law stackexchange.


2

Is what they're doing ethical? Being a chief investigator on a grant does not necessarily imply that you are an author of the proposal. Proposal a writing can even be outsourced to a third party. In order to determine if the proposal is ethical, it would be necessary to read it and read the funding agency's rules, but if it's unethical it is probably not ...


1

I would guess that in the US, if she is willing to start a program that will take 5 to 7 years, she would have a chance for admission. It is an unusual case, but she has learned much, I think, of what a CS undergrad learns here. There will probably be a few missing pieces, such as theory, but that might be made up with the required coursework that is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible