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4

I would start the 6 months post-doc position and look for other positions in the meantime. Also, there is a chance that your contract might get extended within those 6 months as other funding opportunities may become available.


4

Given that your contract wasn't finalized, there probably isn't much you can do. But there are a couple of options, all risky. You could ask the PI if there is any chance that additional funding could happen to at least complete a year. The answer might be maybe and you could decide to take a risk and do the short postdoc and hope for more. In fact, you ...


4

Reaching out to senior faculty in your dept. will be of great help. Many schools have a proposal (or grant) development office that conducts seminars + talks for new faculty and new hires.


3

There shouldn't be any guilt involved since you don't seem to have made any commitment. I think there are some important points to be made in a note totem. Thank you for your interest and support I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed right now and need a bit of time to explore my options and further directions. I'll be more than happy to meet with you ...


2

Norway Since I am living in Norway, I will answer for our country. At this point this might seem like a list of answers for all countries. As for the current rules, Lånekassen is in charge of granting scholarships (stipend) and loans (lån). As long as you are studying fulltime, you have a right to taking up loans granted that you're not a full two ...


2

This depends on what you want your career to be like. At a "teaching-intensive" university or a Liberal Arts college, expect teaching to be much more highly valued than research, though you can't ignore the latter. This explains the small start-up funding. If you want, primarily, to teach, the position will probably serve you well. But if you really want ...


2

In order to do research with a big company's research arm you need to make contact with them. A blind request is probably not going to go anywhere. You need to use some intermediary who is trusted by them. Much of their research is proprietary and so they are required to be secretive about it. Your advisor or another professor at your university who ...


1

Citizenship may matter less than you think. Many post-docs expect to get something back from you for the funding you get. If you can do the required work, it doesn't matter much where you are from. There may be some, of course, that favor citizens and some (national defense work) that require it. And getting appropriate visas has become a problem for many. ...


1

As others have said, the answer would be country dependent. It would be unlikely to hear about someone reimbursing their funding while dropping out of a university at the US. However, I would like to add this as a warning to students from other countries stumbling across this post: in some places, like Brazil, this would not be the case. For instance, the ...


1

For Germany specifically there are the Humboldt Fellowships. These would fund a postdoctoral position or up to 2 years. For fellowships of this type they have a high success rate of around 30%.


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