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132

Being a good teacher and being a good researcher are distinct skills. If someone has a job that requires both skills, they should be being evaluated on both.


99

Sorry to hear that and calm down. I think the suggested approach is destructive and will only serve to highlight the property of being overly sensitive, defensive, and irritable. First, this is a small complaint possibly caused by miscommunication. It's not serious charges such as assault or sexual harassment. Miscommunications happen even we aren't ...


76

Whether this is a standard practice or not highly depends on your university. However, the attribution of these exam period is an automated process and some situations like yours are bound to happen. If I were you, I would consult the specific rules of your University. I know at that my previous Canadian University in Montreal (École Polytechnique), there ...


73

Yes, there is one and only one standard method that is universally employed by reputable academic institutions worldwide. This is how you evaluate a researcher: Read their papers. Attend one of their talks. Ask the opinion of other experts in the field. This is how hiring committees and promotion committees do their job. There are no shortcuts. Parts 1-...


59

As much as I like Google Scholar, requiring candidates to create a Google Scholar profile specifically seems inappropriate. You are effectively saying you won't hire people that don't use Google. What you could do is make it an optional part of the application or you could ask candidates to submit something more vague like a "citation report" and suggest ...


45

I feel there are two different layers to that - whether, and to what extent, teaching evaluations are actually anonymous, and if they aren't, whether it's still "safe" to give a bad one. Are evaluations anonymous? On a superficial level, all universities that I have taught at had entirely anonymous evaluations. At no point in the process was I ever told ...


44

Have you considered ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor IDentifier)? I have the same concerns about intellectual property protection issues around Google unfortunately. GoogleScholar is also quite discipline specific (as others have said here) and is banned in some countries (China, etc). So to endorse a product that exposes a scholar to legal ...


42

It sounds like you've encountered the well-known downside of online disinhibition effect, more colloquially known as GIFT. There is simply nothing that can be done to prevent some people from being horrible when offered anonymity. So, let's parse out two different questions about how you should react: 1) what actions should you take to protect yourself and ...


42

Is this typically done at most American universities, irrespective of a professor's age, status or fame? Yes. It's likely a required process of the administration, as negotiated in the faculty contract. It's probably not something your department has any say over; and in a case such as you describe, the resulting product is likely to be mostly ignored. ...


41

Evaluations only tell you whether your students liked you or not. Your main goal, however, is to have students learn the material and develop their intellectual skills, not to have them like you. Have experienced colleagues sit in on your classes and give you feedback, and have colleagues look at your assessments and the students' performance on them (with ...


38

You must die! You're so cool! These are, at the two ends of the spectrum, example comments that I have received from students along the years. You will find students who love you, those who like you, those for whom you are indifferent, those who dislike you, and those who plainly hate you. This regardless of what you do as a teacher, that is, even from week ...


33

I do not have experience in Canada, but I cannot imagine a university anywhere doing this intentionally. It's very easy to see how it could have happened unintentionally. I would reach out to the professors as soon as possible after receiving the syllabus. The reason I say after is that one or more of the professors may already be planning to hold their ...


28

Yes, it helps in more than one way. Community service is a relevant part on an academic CV. Although reviewers for individual papers are normally secret, it does not need to be secret that you have reviewed articles for journal X. You can write that you have done so on your CV, and if needed (but I don't think it should be), a journal editor can confirm. ...


28

I'm in Australia, and from my experience, almost every unit is evaluated every semester that it runs in pretty much all Australian universities. There might be a few exceptions, but this is just standard practice. The standard survey consists of a bunch of closed ended questions and then some open ended questions for more qualitative feedback. From this ...


27

There is no straightforward answer to this, since it varies enormously by institution. Anonymous feedback can still be unmasked As others have said already, an ostensibly anonymous survey may not end up being so anonymous in practice; it is pretty easy to guess someone's identity, especially if the class is small or if you have interacted with the lecturer ...


26

If one claimed that a particular scholar was "above average" or "noted" in their field, is there any good metric by which to support or deny such a claim? No. As a rule of thumb, this isn't the kind of thing that you can measure with a metric. Elvis Presley was the king of rock and roll. Why? Is it because he pumped out more albums than the others? Because ...


22

It's a good question, and one that's rather difficult to answer. I'll say a few things though. being able to judge your own level of progress and evaluate yourself honestly but fairly is a crucial part of your development. After all, you won't have an advisor for very long, but you'll be a researcher for a long time. So it's good that you're asking this ...


22

Chairs / deans / provosts will tell you that declining will have no effect. This is the official and morally as well as legally correct answer. However, I've had the great pleasure (not) of serving on a committee (at a private, elite R1) where the promotion review chair did not like the candidate and raised the issue that there were a certain percentage of ...


21

Just to add to the other answers with some other points to think about in terms of profile: Reviewers for conferences are often made explicit as Programme Committee members. People who do good work in the PC eventually become Senior Programme Committee members, then Track Chairs, then Programme Chairs, then General Chairs, etc. Even PC membership for good ...


21

I agree that you're over-reacting, and I think once the shock wears off and you take it a bit easier you'll see for yourself what's wrong here. It's definitely not professional to prepare your defence before you even know what you're accused of. Just because you have an award, and almost all your students like you, doesn't prove you're infallible and doesn'...


19

Ben Norris's answer is excellent but I would add one additional point to it. When you are asking for constructive feedback from the students, you must do so in a way that students feel completely comfortable that their honesty is not going to come back to bite them. At the end of every semester, I email all of my students a web-based survey with some open ...


19

First of all, I don't think there is a "conflict" as long as you don't make this one - and you really shouldn't, as there really is no indication of unethical behavior on their side. Let's go over your questions. Is it normal PC members to ask you change the review score when the review does not vary significantly from the others? I never heard such a ...


17

I don't have an opinion on releasing solutions, but the exams should definitely be released. Some students will have access to them through previous students, one way or another. Making them officially available makes sure everyone has the same access.


17

Signs of professional maturity in a researcher: Having written and administered a grant proposal Having been invited to sit on a review panel Having been an invited speaker Having guided or mentored students Having organized a conference session Having published a review paper


17

First: No matter what you do, you will get some complaints, especially if you deal with large student populations. That's simply impossible to avoid. Your institution will probably have some formal requirements for dealing with such complaints, and your chairperson is compelled to follow through with those. The practical response is going to depend on your ...


16

I do not think it is reasonable to ask candidates to create a profile on any third-party platform. Particularly on a google service, taking in account that some proportion of web users have concerns about this company (as well as other large corporate data processing companies), and do not want to get on their radar if possible. Typically, it is sufficient ...


16

Scientific papers are usually published in journals and conference proceedings. Publishers report at least the publication year and month, but may also report more information, like the submission date, the revision date and the date of the first online publication. Your example is just a preprint, not the publisher's version, and does not contain any ...


15

Here are two things you can do: 1) Since the comments you mention have to do with the way you answer questions in class, perhaps it is time to explain your approach. Sometimes all you need to do is explain at the beginning of a course why you are doing certain things. For example, if you do not like giving full answers to questions so that your students ...


15

TL;DR: if you don't know how to evaluate your work, you probably don't know exactly what research question you are working on. How would we perform evaluation for methods that can't be compared against others? I work in applied computer science, and this qualifies as the Number One statement my master students usually have when I ask them how they plan ...


14

From the OP's comments: Evaluations the students gave the OP: [...] there are like 3-4 students with really low evaluations. Grades the OP gave the students: I had about 20 who received As, around 12 Bs, around 10 in C range, 1 D and an F. I don't know if I'm misunderstanding, but it sounds like in a class of 44 students, about 8% gave very poor ...


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