If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

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0

There is nothing out of the ordinary here - they made an offer, you declined, they inquire if there is anything they could do to change your mind (presumably you did not provide a concrete reason for declining, otherwise they would have probably made an offer that potentially changes this reasoning or, if that's not possible, wouldn't even have asked). How ...


25

I would just reply that you thank him for his interest but that it isn't possible to work together at this time. But suggest that you would be honored/happy to stay in contact for the future if your fields of interest intersect. Over the long run you want to build up a set of contacts like this and you have an opportunity to start it. He might be a future ...


7

First, tell no lies. Second, thank the professor for their vote of confidence in your ability. Be gracious. If you are accepting a placement with another advisor or at another institution then say so. You need not provide any reasons justifying your decision. Simply be polite and state the bare minimum required to convey your situation. If you have ...


3

Well, he wanted to have you and is trying to find out whether there is any condition that he may change to convince you otherwise (e.g. pay, conditions or something else). If there isn't way to convince you, then you can simply make clear that you made up your mind to pursue some other option, and, if you wish to be more specific, you could say what you ...


23

The letter is fine, but I'd actually suggest that you replace this: I have asked prof A about studying with him, but he has kindly refer you to me since he's on leave next year. with something like the following: Prof A has referred me to you as being a good fit for my research interests. There is no real need for the rest of it, and might be ...


-2

Chances are, the referee has told/will tell anyway. Just be upfront about it.


0

With due respect: these people don’t work for you, and you have 5 weeks before deadline. If they promised letters, one must presume they will write the letters at a time convenient to them. If you have not heard with 10 days to go before deadline then ask again.


3

Your situation has the first thing I would try built in - ask your other adviser for help. Your committee probably communicates with each other, even if they're in different departments at the same school. Tell the adviser who is responding that you're held up because the other adviser hasn't replied, and see what they suggest. If they are indeed in ...


7

Probably no burned bridges. Like everyone else (especially now) they are busy and just focused on the essential things they need to do to keep everything else together. In normal times you might have gotten a few more replies, but not from everyone. They just say to themselves "oh well" and move on to the next crisis. I suspect that even those who haven't ...


3

I would go with Dear Co-Advisor, last week we agreed on ... Of course, all our previous plans are now obsolete. Please let me know if I can be of any help. If not, as I want to continue my work withouth putting any burden on you, I appreciate if you point me towards someone I could get in touch with.


3

Can you adapt your model to deal with the problem that is interesting everyone else? You don't have to come up with a magical solution to modeling the COVID outbreak, just use your knowledge to say something interesting and relevant. Help your co-advisor with the collection and synthesis of data, do your bit of modeling and write it all up. The level of ...


128

As someone who's been out of academia for a while, I would like to offer a different perspective. Yes, occupying your co-advisor's attention when the roof is on fire is tone-deaf. However: you have acquired skills that are obviously in high demand these days, and are thrown into a (hopefully) once-in-a lifetime situation to apply these skills. Especially ...


20

Yes, it’s fine to email her, but the email should be a lot shorter than your post here. Keep it to an absolute minimum and spare your poor overworked co-adviser having to read any unnecessary apologies, hand-wringing, expressions of sympathy and whatnot. Something like this might work: Dear co-adviser, I’m following up on our meeting from last week. ...


16

I don't see any harm in sending this co-adviser the work you've completed, provided you include a cover message saying that you're aware how busy she is with the high-priority work on the COVID-19 epidemic but you'd really appreciate it if she could find time to suggest what you should do next. That was assuming that, when you wrote "she tells me what to do ...


6

It would be polite and helpful for you to let them know as it reduces their work. But a simple mail/email is all that is required. "Thank you for your consideration, but I've accepted another offer." No more is really needed.


6

“don't worry about graduation, you will be able to graduate online” In this context, I would translate your advisor's thought process as: This student sounds like they are anxious and worried about graduation. The best way I can help them worry less is to simply tell them not to worry. Nothing there about wanting to meet or not. Indeed, if your advisor ...


12

There is no need to apologise for being drunk, as this is really not relevant; such a mixup could happen in any state of mind. There is also no need to apologise profusely for giving him false information; it is just a small mixup that is of little consequence to anyone. To keep the consequences at a minimum, it would grace you to spare your professor the ...


70

This shouldn't be a big deal. If I were in your position I would simply email the professor and apologise, say you had made a mistake. But keep it professional, don't make a big deal about it, and you don't need to draw attention to the fact you were drunk... especially since not everyone's drunkenness presents as making up random things about people, and it ...


93

I don't see why Germany should be any different from other places, but generally it is a good idea to apologize for stupid things said drunkenly. And since this may have a bearing on the reputation of a third party you probably have an obligation to make sure the record is correct. Sooner is better than later in such things, so the professor doesn't spend ...


0

There's no harm in saying you enjoyed the course. And I'm sure the teacher would be glad to hear it. Therefore, by all means, say that you enjoyed the course. A wider issue, of course, is whether students should email their lecturers at all. This never used to happen, when there was no internet. Why not say thank you in person?


1

Simple enough to just ask. Ask if the offer is still open and what your next steps should be. And express your enthusiasm as you have here. Four days isn't actually that long. Nor is a week without a reply. But if it is upcoming soon then an email now should be fine.


0

We live for this. Please, please do.


1

I have noted that Asian students tend to go with Dear Dr Firstname or Dear Prof Firstname. They mean nothing bad by it and I let it slide. If a student signs off with their full name, and I were to use their last name in my reply, it would come across as standoffish or an implied rebuttal. (This is UK culture.) So I respond with Dear Firstname; this is not ...


0

I have always been in exactly the same boat. (Short, uncommon but hard to get wrong first name, versus long and foreignese-complicated surname.) I went with first name. Since I have not been able to live out my life in a parallel universe that is identical up to a longer email handle, I have no control experiment that would allow me to assert with certainty ...


1

If you have an "action item" that requires her okay then send an email (or other accepted communication). If you are just anxious and can proceed for now on your own then it might be better to show patience. As comments to your question suggest, and even the question itself, the calendar may be inaccurate. Things might have come up. Perhaps she just trusts ...


0

Not very organized, but here goes. Make a list of your specific interests (not just for now, going forward: are you interested in graduate school or work afterwards?). Areas of particular interest? Make a list of potential schools, their strengths (and possible non-matches with your interests, "weaknesses" is just too strong a word). Look which ones most ...


6

Similar to business, one important key to be successful in Academia is having contacts and collaborations. Your relationship with your former advisor didn't finish on the day of your PhD examination. You should be one of his close colleagues in the domain and this applies to you as well. Otherwise, where to find collaborators for project proposals and joint ...


1

I find it worrying to see so many questions like this. They make academia seem like a terrifying place. It really isn't. Standard rules of engagement apply (pun intended). So, someone (A) introduced me to someone else (B) via email, so that I can ask B questions and get advice. The email is directed at B, and I am copied. Should I wait for B to email me, ...


5

Is this customary? What would be the most polite way to ask? What is the best way to go about this? Don't overthink this: Just email your advisor, it is normal.


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