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2

The answer to the title question is "no". Many editorial management systems will not change the status date unless the status itself changes. If reviewers decline to review and the editor invites new reviewers, the status stays as "under review", and the status date stays at the date at which the first reviewers were invited. My concern ...


3

Article processing charges are quite often waived for new open access journals (as this one appears to be - Volume 1 is listed as "in progress"). As I understand it the hope is to attract researchers to publish in these journals, even though they might not yet be listed in particular databases (Scopus, PubMed etc.) and don't have impact factors (or ...


-1

It shouldn't be a problem for an established publisher. Perhaps they just wound up with some extra funds and decided this would be good community relations. A smaller press might have gotten a grant for such things, but this just sounds like a feel-good gesture. It is also possible that they have a need to catapult submissions for some of their journals. But ...


4

Like for so many other questions about the status of submissions on this forum (search!), there is just no way for you to know. It may be that the editor has found the requisite number of reviewers but reviewers are taking their sweet time to get their assessments written; or that the editor is sitting on their hands and not doing much; or or or. You just ...


3

Companion journals are separate journals on the same topic. The content and bibliometrics, including impact factor, are different. Usually, the newer journal is considered lower quality. It has different editorial standards. An example of three companion journals: Nature (1869) Nature Communications (2010) Scientific reports (2011) The purpose of a ...


3

Assuming you can't pay the fee, then you should make it clear to the journal that you can't pay the fee. What happens next is up to them. It's possible they will retract the article; it's also possible they will publish it anyway as a gesture of goodwill. Will it affect your chances of future publications in other journals of the same publisher? It's ...


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