71

You could try contacting the editor in chief of the journal to see if they could get the problem fixed. This worked for me when I had similar problems with a paper last year.


62

Sounds like he's sticking to his moral principles, which is the best anyone can do. Maybe he could evangelize his opinion more to increase the impact of his crusade, but that's about it. I disagree with the insinuation that he may be doing his field a disservice, since moving away from the ancient publishing model is a good thing for any field in the long ...


44

It doesn't even necessarily mean that all reviews are completed. Sometimes editors invite more reviewers than is required. This message only means that the configured lower bound has been reached.


42

The Elsevier boycott seems to be the largest one of its kind. I understand the argument to be: A boycott is easier to maintain against a single publisher than against several publishers at once, since it limits the cost to the participants while, if anything, making the boycott more painful to the publisher. There's a short list of likely candidates for a ...


41

You need to learn to have patience with the peer review process. It means neither good nor bad, just that the reviews are in. You can't see further into this hole than that.


40

This often happens when a document uses the CMYK color space and the black is set as (0,0,0,100). When you go print in a monochrome environment, the document's color information is converted to grayscale first. Because black ink on white paper can't actually create gray, a halftoning process is applied, where the shades of gray are hinted at by using a ...


39

You attempted to use a crayon license, that is, modify the terms of an existing well-established license to better suit your needs. This is frowned upon, because it can cause legal complications. In particular, the license CC-BY-NC 4.0 license that you attached to your work states The Licensor shall not be bound by any additional or different terms or ...


30

Based on your comments, the typesetting problems are not just about ugly formatting, but they actually change the meaning of the article (and significantly increase the chance that people will misread it). This is not explained clearly in your question. Did you explain it clearly to the journal manager? He might think that you are a perfectionist who is ...


27

The Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is an agency of the US Treasury that is empowered by US federal law to edict and enforce embargoes and economic sanctions. Thus, US journal editors are bound by its regulations, whether they like it or not. Violating them would expose them, and their employers, to liability. If they violated them willingly, the ...


26

Example of boycott against Springer leading to the creation of an freely accessible scientific journal: the Journal of Machine Learning Research: The journal was founded as an open-access alternative to the journal Machine Learning. In 2001, forty editors of Machine Learning resigned in order to support JMLR, saying that in the era of the internet, it was ...


23

(converted from a comment on request). I don't think much has changed about pricing, but Elsevier has made open access all the content of their journals in mathematics after a 48 month embargo (source). This was a very appreciated move: mathematicians often rely on old articles for their research, so 4 years isn't too long to wait (for some), for this ...


23

guifa is correct in their analysis of why this happens, but I would like to note that there is often an easy fix available once you know what is going on and so long as the PDF is saved as text rather than as a scanned image. When you go to print from the PDF, click Properties from the Print menu, and on the advanced tab hopefully you'll see something like ...


21

This simply means the reviews are completed. It is not good news or bad news, it simply means the reviews are available to the editor. Hopefully you hear back soon, although frankly sometimes even at this stage it can take weeks (even months)!


19

People decline to serve as editors or reviewers for all sorts of reasons. "Too busy" and "conflict of interest" are two common ones that are easily applicable to your case. All junior faculty have too much on their plate and no one knows what your chair or mentor has told you that you need to focus on. So "unavailable/too busy to take this on" is an ...


19

In general, when a paper is rejected, you can resubmit it to another journal as soon as you feel you are ready. There is no minimum waiting time, and it doesn't matter whether both journals have the same publisher or not. As far as I know, publishers don't generally share information about submissions between journals. (However, it could happen that the ...


19

I think that this will be good practical experience for you, regardless of whether you're proceeding to further study. A few things to note: Discuss your plan and involve your supervisor in your preparation of the manuscript. The reason for the first is that statistically significant results and a potential research gap aren't sufficient in and of ...


18

Cape Code has given a good answer, but it's not the only possibility for such a rejection. Suppose you publish a paper in, say, "Topology and Its Applications", in which you prove some topological result using (among other things) a set-theoretic lemma. And suppose I later prove some result in algebra using (among other things) your lemma. Of course, I ...


17

If you think Elsevier is infringing your copyright, then you are infringing on others (1, 2, 3, 4) That chart is very standard. The information itself is uncopyrightable. The only thing that stands out is the rainbow spectrum, but even then you weren't the first to draw it like that, see this book published 2006: 5. I'm sure the people working in the ...


16

If authorities disregard a journal en masse, that journal (or series of journals) will lose any reputation for quality publication. If poor-quality papers get through to publication due to a drop off in submissions or high-quality available reviewers, that journal will lose even more reputation for quality. This sort of issue should be self-correcting if ...


16

Contact the editor you worked with and let them know. They will advise you of your options and hopefully work with you to update the online version and (if possible) either delay or fix the print version.


16

Check the journal's guidelines. Different Elsevier journals have different preferences. Some are happy with either American or British English, as long as you are consistent.


15

@Stephan Kolassa has given the technically correct answer. I will add that all of this is irrelevant to the vast majority of universities, since they don't pay individual journal prices. They pay for an Elsevier bundle, and Elsevier forces them to keep the amount paid secret. It seems clear that bundle prices are determined based on what Elsevier believes ...


15

(Copy Editor speaking ;-) ) When designing a journal's typesetting style, there are several things to consider: What are the paper size restrictions? Can you choose any paper size or choose from a short list, or is it fixed? For instance, Springer uses it's own paper size for many publications, The journal I typeset is stuck to A4 because it's the cheapest ...


15

To expand on Dirk's comment: The status you see means that the reviewers have submitted their reports to the online system, and the handling editor has received an email about this. Now she has to read the comments (and likely look at your manuscript again to see if they comments are relevant), come to a decision, and write a corresponding letter to the ...


14

In electronic submission systems the manuscript (MS) is handled according to a certain work flow. When a MS is submitted it has to be assigned to an editor who will check, for example, if the MS is appropriate for the journal or adheres to journal "Instructions for Authors" (or equivalent). The editor will then either start to assign reviewers to your MS or ...


14

I've asked many professors why they submit to journal X instead of journal Y. Reasons given include: Geographic location (e.g. British astronomers are more likely to submit to Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society simply because that's a British journal) Impact factor Scope (certain journals are more theoretical than others, certain topics are ...


13

I had the same question and I got in touch with the journal editorial office and got a quick reply saying: Upon checking, I noticed that some reviewers have yet to submit their reviews. The status "Required Reviews Completed" shows when the required number of reviews is reached. Please note that the editor is still waiting for additional reports for ...


13

My reading is that the associate editor has rejected the article and it just has to be formalized by either the editorial staff or the editor-in-chief. Prepare for an email with bad news :-(


13

Independently from whether you can get Elsevier to fix the problems that they introduced, my recommendation would be to take your own version of the paper (the one that you produced yourself, without the additional errors) and deposit that version to an open repository, e.g., arXiv. (Depending on the journal, it is probably possible to do this while ...


12

Mathematics journals (including many published by Elsevier) are usually single column. I assume this is because of the frequent need for long equations. The longer lines are somewhat more difficult for the eye, but one gets used to it.


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