157

It looks to me like you did not do so badly as you think. Two publications and 3.7 GPA are not so bad. It might depend on the field, it might not be the best ever, but I have seen much worse. If your supervisor offered you a postdoc position after having you for 6 years as a PhD student, it means that they consider your work useful. You might be suffering ...


147

I'm deeply involved in web technologies, including search results. The simplest and fastest way to solve this problem is to add other search results. The more "legitimate" and positive results found, the less likely the others will be seen. There are numerous factors in raising search results, but still: Create another Stack Exchange account with your name ...


133

Relax. No one cares, and no one will judge you on what you said when you were 12. (At least, no one who was ever 12 years old themselves...)


128

The only thing that a high MSE or MO reputation indicates is that a person spends too much time on the internet (and I say that as someone with a reasonably high reputation on MO). I don't think you should take it seriously as a data point on how successful you are likely to be. On a related note, it also doesn't play any role in things like hiring ...


103

Straight answer: NO it's not a good idea Citing someone is (and should) be neither a favor nor a gesture of politeness. So there's no point to send a thank you email. Thanking someone for a citation seems a way to beg for something. If you want to collaborate send an email explaining why you want to collaborate, or mention that you have read their paper ...


93

People change their minds. This is a reality. It would not hurt you to ask if the position is still open. Explain the situation and ask if they would still be interested in hiring you for a post-doc. Be warned that it is very possible that they will just write back and tell you that they are no longer interested or that the position has been filled. Be ...


90

In CS field, an entry-level software engineer in top-tier tech companies (e.g. Google, Facebook, etc.) could earn as much as a 20-year experience professor....Why do so many PhDs still choose to be a professor while they have the choice to go to the industry? First, your assumption is wrong. Most PhDs end up in industry. I don't have any source but I ...


88

The first paper I read took two months to process. Now, I can skim through two papers for breakfast. It is not that you get more material to read, but rather you get much more efficient at skipping things you know or recognize as unimportant. It comes with practice - try reading papers and books, and think about what are the important parts. Learn to ...


81

This is a bit opinion-based, but I'll offer my own personal take on an answer in the hopes that it might be useful; at least parts of what I wrote below seem pretty generally applicable to me. Is it possible to survive/remain in academia by working normal hours (8-9 hours per day) without working evenings, weekends, holidays, without feeling guilty about ...


65

European Union privacy rules include certain aspects of the right to be forgotten. I am not an expert on what this means precisely, but it seems to include the right to have search engines remove certain information associated with your name from search results. Here is another page provided by Google with more information and a form for submitting privacy-...


63

Let's flip this question around and imagine that you, as a first year anthropology PhD student, are now visiting your high school. One of the students asked your former teachers if you would be interested in a local, anthropology-related research project they were doing (e.g., they could be investigating the attitudes of people towards those who are HIV ...


60

I don't see a point in holding back ideas on purpose, at least not for a longer time. If you are doing well in research, you will generally have more interesting ideas than you have time to pursue. And you will keep having new ideas all the time. So there won't be a time when you will have ample of time, but be in desperate need of a great project. So you ...


57

The quality of your thesis overshadows the length/duration of your PhD. Having said that, it depends on your goals. If you clearly think (and your adviser as well) that another year would make a big impact on the quality of your thesis and, consequently, on your CV, and is not too risky to pursue extra work (i.e., the questions you want to tackle are not ...


56

I think you should consider transferring to another grad school. Certainly prospects on the post-doc market won't be good without any publications, interesting work, or a strong letter of recommendation. On the other hand, your advisor's grant expiring and no one else being able to take you gives you a very good reason to want to change grad schools. Your ...


49

There are several benefits of writing book reviews for publication: Develop an understanding of the publications that are out there. Just like how reading academic papers affords you the benefit of being abreast with the latest research, writing book reviews allows you the opportunity to learn more about a field. Develop a relationship with a journal. ...


47

Attempting to fit the material of your paper into a talk is a common mistake: even for shorter papers, there is typically simply too much to include all of the significant details. Instead, I recommend thinking of your talk as an advertisement for your paper. Your goal is to present enough of the key interesting material to be able to convince somebody that ...


47

My first, and maybe best, advice would be to do more collaborations. Collaborations with local and remote colleagues. Collaborations with students. Build yourself a circle of people willing to work with you so that you learn from each other. Start with your own advisor and try to get to be a part of their circle. Go to conferences and use them to expand ...


46

Over the course of a long career in teaching, the nature of your instruction will necessarily need to change as both our scientific understanding of the world and our society change. This is especially true for undergraduate and graduate instruction, where the knowledge is more specialized and changes more quickly, but I would argue it is also true for much ...


44

Presuming you have some way to fund their work, and you have positions to offer, I suggest you start by recruiting bright undergrads from your upper-division courses. Get them involved in your research before they graduate. Offer them positions as PhD students before they apply everywhere else*. I was so excited by my PhD supervisor's work (our work really), ...


44

To what extent is MSE reputation an indication of potential in academia? Very little. You get a lot of reputation for simple answers to simple questions that make it onto the HNQ list, because those are the ones that people can quickly understand and say, "Yeah, that's right." Conversely, you get little reputation for deep, detailed answers to difficult ...


42

This doesn't sound like your website will have special requirements that an all-purpose CMS couldn't handle. My advice is to go for one of those "all included" packages by a mainstream provider with something like Wordpress, and find a nice-looking template. This is the easiest choice, it will guarantee up-time, and you don't have to spend valuable time to ...


40

I can say for sure that the prestige of a journal can help you, particularly if you are a young academic! I was applying for a position at a university several years ago and ended up being the second-choice candidate. Even though my publication record was larger than the other candidate's, and I had been publishing in good journals such as Journal of ...


40

This question is definitely more of a online reputation management question so my only advice is buckle up and try to anonymize your past actions. Here are some suggestions: Change your username on those forums and remove profile details Often times this will globally change your name across all your posts Contact the forums and ask them to de-associate ...


39

To be honest, I'm tempted to agree with Buffy. It sounds like the biggest issue you have might actually be the one you identified at the start of your post - low self-confidence. Studying for a PhD, and working in academia in general, has a tendency to have that effect on people - you're far from alone. If I were you, I'd be tempted to take stock of my ...


37

No, because citation is a matter of transparency to scholarship generally... No, one does not "thank" someone for citing one's paper. An academic author is obliged to cite a paper when he/she is either placing reliance on or referring to its ideas, content, or argument. An academic author does not cite a paper simply because he/she wants to promote its ...


36

One piece of useful advice my thesis supervisors gave me was: We're going to throw a lot of ideas at you. You need to figure out which ones are worthwhile and which ones aren't. If you know that something isn't going to work, then you need to figure out how to communicate to your advisor that it's not feasible. If you've tried and didn't succeed in ...


36

I find a little radical to stop collaborating scientifically with her (in part because there is no one around working on this area!), but as the time goes by it seems to me that the best option is to start working alone on this common area, or some similar solution... There is some truth to the often-heard advise that one should stop regularly collaborating ...


36

If you haven't come to an agreement on what you would discuss, then I think you are pretty free. But as a courtesy, if nothing else, send him a note about your topic. If he disagrees you might want to re-think it. However, a talk about partially unformed ideas, if presented that way can be very valuable. It can give ideas about research the listeners might ...


35

While Dan Romik's answer applies to lots of people in academia, there are also the "others". I do know concrete examples of successful scientists that regularly work 9-5 (or similar). This is possible, with a few caveats: works only for extremely disciplined people may not apply to the Ph.D./postdoc stage, where there is time-sensitive pressure to build a ...


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