219

Aeismail’s answer is spot on: who you choose to dedicate it to is entirely up to you (modulo political expedience). I've read theses dedicated to martyrs and I've read theses dedicated to cats. Do what you feel moved to do. See answers here for some discussion. As for how it would be received by the Jewish community and Jewish mathematicians, I am confident ...


62

Who you choose to recognize in your acknowledgments is up to you. If you would like to dedicate it to the memory of someone, that's entirely your choice. If you are worried about the political backlash, you could submit the thesis to the reviewer without the dedication and acknowledgments and then add those at the end.


41

a mathematics thesis might not be the place to "confront" like this. No, I disagree. There are few ways in academia to draw attention to this crime more powerful than the acknowledgements section of your thesis. I hope you choose to do so! Also, to speak to another part of your comment . . . I am a Muslim student in a non-Arab country. Would it be ...


32

A lot of people don't seem to realize that acknowledgments are most often inserted into the thesis after the committee has read and signed off on it. On the one hand this is justified because they are not part of the intellectual content of the thesis, and indeed the committee should not be swayed by the acknowledgments in either way. On the other hand, ...


23

This sort of thing is really up to the editor, not the reviewers. Reviewers are to assess your paper on scientific/academic grounds. The proper position or appropriateness of an epilogue is not really their purview, it's an issue of journal style (though I also don't find it wrong that they commented on it; effectively, they are helping the editor by '...


14

(Mathematics:) I have dedicated a few journal articles "to the memory of" recently deceased colleagues (one in a "special issue journal" for this purpose, but others in regular journal issues). I just included the dedication in the submitted paper, and no-one complained about or commented on it, and it appeared in the published version. Regarding placement:...


11

Dedication generally comes in your front matter section in your thesis. It will depend on your university rules and guidelines. Generally "dedication" is not mandatory in most of universities. However it is advisable to check with your academic office. Quoting from Harvard guidelines for thesis writing, Front matter may include: acknowledgments of help ...


11

I would argue that such a dedication is appropriate - it serves to memorialize a great person who moved mathematical study forwards significantly, and was killed by an oppressive regime due to his ethnic background. This would be akin to a computer science publication being dedicated to Alan Turing, the father of modern computer science, who was oppressed ...


7

I started my Ph.D. a few years after my father passed away. I dedicated the thesis to him. I wrote, "To my father who never saw this adventure" (something like this when translated). Like all who commented, I would say keep it short, keep it personal. Grief makes it difficult to find words. Actually, looking back at my thesis and this dedication ...


7

I had a dedication page in my PhD thesis, to my recently deceased grandparents. I kept it short, with a line that basically translates to: "To my grandparents, in loving memory." The things you suggest to include and to reference will make it more personal, and more appropriate for you. And that is all that matters: write it such that it represents ...


6

I would be interested to know what high-impact journals you have seen dedications in, because it would be quite foreign in all of the ones that I have encountered. In my experience, dedications almost always only appear in stand-alone works, such as books and theses, or an explicitly dedicated collection such as a Festschrift, rather than in individual ...


6

As a Jewish researcher in the Jewish state, I was profoundly touched by your post. I agree with previous answers that you can make this acknowledgment. But at the same time, it may indeed potentially damage you, as Arthur Tarasov said. Probably you can make some more general dedication to all innocently killed or repressed mathematicians (or scientists, in ...


5

If your advisor has had a large enough impact on his field or sub-field, it may be possible to organize a special issue in honor of his birthday. For example, Donald DeAngelis had a special issue of Ecological Modelling dedicated to him. The first article was titled "Next-generation ecological modelling: A special issue dedicated to Donald DeAngelis on the ...


5

There are absolutely ways to do this. First, if you feel like they genuinely helped in some way, the acknowledgements section is perfectly appropriate - this need not necessarily be serious. For example, I ended up thanking my mother-in-law for spending some time talking to me about how certain aspects of what she does work, along with Stack Overflow and ...


4

I have dedicated a few journal papers to my colleagues too and by now I have at least one dedicated to me. There is nothing wrong with dedications, epigraphs, etc. in general if you exercise some common sense, tact and taste when including them. In the worst case scenario, the editors will suggest removing them (as happened to one of my epigraphs that was a ...


4

Generally, I don't think that dedications are common. In engineering, for instance, you never see a dedication except in a textbook (not common though) and PhD thesis. Besides that, no scientific reviewer should be impacted by a dedication. There are always black sheep, who won't like it or even have a problem with it. As reviewers or a panel are always a ...


3

The key reasons include: panel mates may be atheists and hence may not receive it properly, I agree with this statement. There is a thing in psychology called in-group versus out-group categorization. One such grouping is religion. So, when you put a dedication like this on the page, you are saying many things, but one of them is "I am a member of <...


3

You should be careful when writing personal statements into public work. These include dedications, acknowledgements, even cover pictures in some cases. This is intended as general advice, without the political implications which other answers already discussed. You should always ask yourself "What is the message I want to convey?" and "What am I achieving ...


2

Is it important for you to concentrate on his death? I (personally) would rather be remembered for what I achieved and and not what was done to me. So rather "He was great mathematician and his research influenced hundreds of mathematicians in the following decades".


1

I think that the idea behind this is excellent and highly laudable. The only possible issue is that an academic publication should be purely academic and free from any personal political or moral (as opposed to ethical) stance. With this in mind I think it would perhaps be better to restrict any acknowledgements to those which had a direct influence on ...


1

This paper was dedicated to the memory of an individual and was published in a high-impact journal: New Journal of Physics is ranked 7th in the Google ranking of journals listed by impact factor. The dedication is indicated by an asterisk at the end of the title that sends to a footnote on the first page and there is also a line in the acknowledgements ...


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