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121

The first thing to do is to contact her estate. You can probably reach someone through her last affiliation. I assume that they have control over all of the papers and effects of the deceased. Since you say she is famous, there my be some posthumous attempt to honor her in some collected publication, but the estate, possibly a spouse, should have knowledge ...


90

If I cared enough about a person to write a letter of recommendation, I would be pleased to think that one day after I am gone that the person could use my letter for their benefit. You will possibly benefit from this recommendation and possibly someone else will suffer if you are selected based upon the recommendation; however, competition is not generally ...


84

I attach letters of recommendation from Dr W and the late Professor X. Perfectly reasonable. The point is, it's courteous to refer to the deceased as the late Professor X to prevent confusion or embarrassment and to avoid unnecessary pain to the bereaved. If you don't do this, and the widower receives a letter addressed to his wife that assumes she's ...


76

You should definitely keep the name. I've seen that people who passed away during some endeavor usually have their names surrounded with a rectangle. You can also consider putting some In Memoriam page for your mentor somewhere at the beginning of the thesis. You should consult other people within your institutions culture to make sure that this doesn't ...


74

To get the elephant out of the room first: If you are contemplating suicide and wondering whether you will hurt the tenure case of your advisor by this, stop this thought right there and get counselling. The tenure case really is of no concern in this question. I am sure your advisor would also agree to this. Now, assuming that this is a hypothetical ...


52

My sincere condolences. I am in the same situation: one of my advisors passed away 6 months before the end of my PhD. Here are the issues I faced: My thesis had to be supervised until the viva. OP (as it was the case for me) seems to have another supervisor. Talk with them and this shouldn't be an issue — especially if this other supervisor is in the ...


44

It is up to the conference committee to decide in exceptional circumstances. This is probably all that can be said about this.


41

If the author has coauthored work with someone recently, that coauthor can be a good first contact. For one thing, they might know someone in the family and perhaps know who is executor for her estate. They might also be in possession of other partially finished works and you might work together toward a common solution. Coauthors sometimes know a scholar ...


39

In academia, as everywhere, life happens. Fortunately, a lot of people understand this. It will definitely be harder to succeed when your advisor has passed away than if your advisor had lived. I suspect, however, that it will be much easier than if you had a falling out with your advisor, which has been addressed in a number of different questions on this ...


34

I'm quite sure that for most professors, their own tenure is about last in the things they care about in this situation. Professors are people too, they care about their students and how they do. In some sense, your students are your children too, as you see them grow up and spend a lot of time together. You're proud if they succeed, and you're sad if they ...


34

I certainly don't think it's "crass", and I have a hard time seeing who could be disrespected. In general, you can acknowledge whomever you want in a thesis and the only crass thing would be to say something negative about them. However, there is possibly a bit of room for misunderstanding here, because the ostensible purpose of the acknowledgments is to ...


32

aeismail's answer is definitely good advice, but I'll add two more bits: Check the journal policy and author guidelines. There may be something in there that can guide your choice, like the Journal of the American Chemical Society has: Deceased persons who meet the criteria for inclusion as coauthors should be so included, with an Author Information note ...


24

In essence, a speaker who dies on the way to the conference is no different from a speaker who has to cancel because of a reason other than death, like a family emergency, illness, injury, logistical problem,... and there are already articles on this subject. I am going to quote relevant parts here from https://www.mpiweb.org/blog/article/4-ways-to-handle-...


23

This sort of thing is really up to the editor, not the reviewers. Reviewers are to assess your paper on scientific/academic grounds. The proper position or appropriateness of an epilogue is not really their purview, it's an issue of journal style (though I also don't find it wrong that they commented on it; effectively, they are helping the editor by '...


22

No. The nice thing about most academic departments is that the bus factor is fairly high such that if an individual PI is incapacitated, there is generally enough slack in the system to compensate. Most funding bodies allow for contingencies. They understand that things happen and that the funding often affects people other than the PI. In the case of the ...


19

I am in, more or less, your exact situation. My PhD supervisor died of a brain tumor in 2011. However, he did not leave behind a letter for me, nor am I on the market. I think you should be careful of the culture that you are applying in. If the culture demands, usually, that the letter be blind to the applicant, then you should probably not use it unless ...


18

Verified email just mean that the user has done the confirmation in his/her inbox. It means in that case that the person that created this profile has an email with the domain "@melipona.org". Usually, people will do this verification with their institutional email, adding credence that this is the right person, but technically, anyone within an institution ...


16

We had a similar situation at my university when a professor running a large group with millions of research dollars passed away. There are a few issues that have to be dealt with, and usually the department chair and/or the dean play a major role in this research funding: often this can be transferred (in consultation with program managers) to faculty in ...


14

One option would be to have the letter sent to a colleague who knows your work and was close to your late professor. That person could then write you a letter which could incorporate some of the information from your late professor's letter. For example, they could include an excerpt from that letter put into context. This both gets around some of the ...


13

Where can I get help with this? You could try asking his colleagues or other professional acquaintances (including past coauthors of his), or former graduate students. Even if they can't help, they may be able to direct you to more appropriate people. If you can't track down any relevant individuals, you could try asking the current chair of his former ...


12

Find out who inherited his copyright, and ask them for permission. If he's long dead, his copyright may have expired and the work entered the public domain, but this period depends on governing law, jurisdiction, and numerous other variables. A century since the death of the author is probably a safe buffer but not infallible (and gets riskier the more ...


12

The unexpected death of someone close to you is a tough situation; more than that, it is one of the archetypical tough situations throughout human history. The obvious -- but not easy -- general answer is that you need to either become more self-reliant, find other people to satisfy the needs and desires that were being met by the departed party, or some of ...


11

First off, I am so sorry for your loss. Disclaimer, my field is not mathematics. That being said, adviser plays a dual role, expert and mentor. In their technical expert role, he or she works closely with you to guide you through the difficult problems. In their mentoring role, they take care of you being motivated, dealing with the stress, advise on how ...


11

This is without doubt a tragic situation. However, it is not an insurmountable problem. As you suggested, the important thing is to allow both the grieving process and the research to continue at their appropriate paces. Without the room to understand and deal with what's happened, the research can't really go as it's supposed to, and the work is needed to ...


10

Maybe someone else in the department can supervise your work and maybe they can't--the fact is that they won't, and that's what you have to work with. My (pessimistic) gut feeling is that the department head has essentially written you off as collateral damage. He's willing to push you through for a completion because that's good for the department, but he ...


10

(My personal take on this matter - which is only based on intuition/opinion rather than experience): When you're about to publish such a paper, ask yourself: "How certain am I that the deceased would have put their name on the paper?" If the answer is "certain", go ahead and name them a co-author. But - explain that the attribution is posthumous, both in a ...


10

There won't be any standard way for this to be handled, and it's not really up to you, directly. You'll need to discuss this with the editor; I'm sure they will work with you to make this not an issue, perhaps either by having the other coauthors speak for the deceased or simply waiving the requirement. How to acknowledge a deceased advisor’s contributions ...


9

The social etiquette of acknowledgments sections vary from school to school. It would never be rude or disrespectful. I thanked family and friends in mine - and made reference to an internal lab jokee. Check previous theses to get an indication of etiquette in your school, but I don't see any reason this would be inappropriate.


9

In my country we put a frame, with the name and surname inside the rectangle. This means that the author died in the process of creation.


9

There may be laws that govern this, though laws vary from place to place. Normally he would have to give permission and that "right" may legally have passed to his heirs. You would do well to contact someone responsible for his estate and take up the question with them. But since he never gave permission, you don't have permission, yet, to include ...


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