147

Adhere to the guidelines and syllabus you posted. If students can get around consequences of late submission by arguing, you have set a precedent, and they (and future generations of students) will argue again the next time. Don't go there. Consciously cultivate a reputation that pointless arguments don't work with you. Next time, make it clear that "normal"...


136

Don't assume anything about your students' schedules. Set your deadlines so everyone can manage their time based on their own needs. You are concerned about encouraging your students to do work on the weekends. Consider that many students have customer service jobs that require them to work on the weekends (retail, restaurants, etc). They might work nights ...


84

Much would depend on the concrete situation. But, by default, I would think that activism is part of student's life that the student needs to learn to manage themselves; if they do not have the resources or ability to manage their activism effectively so as not to have them interfere with their studies, then, largely, I would consider this to be their ...


81

It's fine. Students are expected to manage their time appropriately. However, one of the things I despise most as a student is when the instructor doesn't finish covering the material needed for the assignment until shortly before it's due. So if, for example, you have a Friday lecture that contains information pertinent to the assignment (other than to ...


66

First of all, I think the distribution that you're seeing is not very unusual, and indeed looks very similar to the distribution of times that I see coming from mature scientists submitting conference papers and grants. It is simply that people, including your students, tend to overcommit themselves and to underestimate the difficulty of work. When that is ...


58

I just missed the my grad school application deadline....... This is the biggest and most serious mistake I even made in my life... If that's really true, then what a great life you've had. You'll bounce back from this and be back to sunshine and roses sooner or later. [D]oes anyone of you know if the department would accept my late application in this ...


57

It's absolutely valid to set deadlines on Sunday evening. You do not force the students to work on weekends. This is their own responsibility to manage their workload. They are still allowed to hand in their results on Friday and then they can have a free weekend. One may even argue that a deadline on the weekend gives even greater freedom to the students as ...


53

Lots of good and lengthy answers here: put concisely the answer is a resounding no. A huge benefit of choosing to do something extracurricular in college is learning the consequences of failing to balance responsibilities. By giving extensions to a student that chooses to spend time doing something outside of coursework, you fail to help them find this ...


48

While I admire your concern for the students, I feel that ultimately your endeavor is quixotic. To be sure, I see nothing wrong with making your deadline be at 10 pm. It won't change anything, so you might as well. But I wouldn't expect it to have any notable effect, and I would be wary of the slippery slope that leads to you blaming yourself for the ...


48

My first question is what you thought would happen? In my experience, many secretaries would handle it exactly in this way - your email is fairly unspecific in what you thought the secretary would do ("remind him about this" - he/she did by forwarding your mail, and at the same time probably wondering why you did not send it directly to him). If you thought ...


39

"UTC-12" is a timezone 12 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time, which is (more or less) the time in Greenwich, UK. Nobody actually lives there, though. A day is 24 hours, and the Earth is divided into 27 major timezones from UTC-12 to UTC+141, with the UK in the middle(ish). Therefore, someone in UTC-12 is the very last person to reach a time. ...


36

There's always a person, and they're usually reasonable. Just contact the conference chair or program committee chair and ask them to let you know how to send in your rebuttal. In short, talk to people.


35

In all phases of a US student's career, it is understood that many people will be applying based on their anticipated graduation date, rather than having already graduated. Thus: High school students apply for colleges in the fall, even though they won't graduate until the end of spring. Undergraduates apply for graduate schools in the fall, even though ...


35

You have nothing to lose by reaching out -- the sooner the better. The best person would be a professor who recruited you (wants you in their group) or informed you of the offer. But I would also reach out to: Any administrator who contacted you Any other professors you are interested in working for Whichever faculty member in the department is in charge of ...


34

How should I respond to these students who keep on asking me not to penalize them when the penalty is deserved? I would say that your "Stop wasting my time arguing for marks!" just needs a slightly different phrasing. So if students keep bugging you with basically the same unfounded reason to grant some exception, I would finally write something like "I ...


32

I would consider a deadline at around 10p.m. very wise and student-friendly. I remember staying up late night as long as the submission system allows to post a new version and polishing the hell out of my assignment, although it probably made little difference. As a lecturer I have always readily given small extensions to people who asked at least a little (...


32

I have tried many methods, to varying degrees of success. Here are some that work. Check the wording in the syllabus to make sure it's impeccable. For example, "due by 9pm" can be revised to more specific as "due by 9pm, based on the indicated time of submission on [whatever online platform]." Allow for 15 minutes technical mayhem leniency. If it's due by ...


31

Contact them, explain yourself, and ask if it is OK to resubmit your application. (And make sure that you can submit a significantly better application before the new deadline.) This has the added advantage of bringing you in contact with the PI, and putting yourself on their radar.


28

This means that as long as there is a place on earth where the deadline has not yet passed, you can still submit. Thus, it is the time zone of e.g. Baker Island: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/usa/baker-island


27

I'd like to add my two cents as a current student with three years of college behind me. In my experience, I've always preferred having a deadline of midnight to a deadline of 10pm because during the school year, I'm often up until midnight regardless, and sometimes my workload requires me to prioritize my assignments in such a way that many things get ...


26

I see no problem in releasing your estimate of related dates "as you've been asked to help some students schedule," with the same caveats you give here (which I would highlight). It's always good to be responsive to fairly easy requests by students, but it would be unreasonable for students to expect a schedule to be set in stone.


25

I'll try to explain the problem from both perspectives: author and a journal typesetter. The typesetting process goes as follows: We pre-plan the issue contents 2 months in advance, in order to balance the issues in size. This is necessary for small journals with 4 or 6 issues per year, not quite for large journals with a long publishing queue. At this ...


24

Galley proofs are part of the production process where a book or journal issue is actually printed, as opposed to the 'softer' process of deciding what pieces will go into it and in what form. As such, the deadlines for their revision are associated with the physical production process rather than the editorial process for the piece and can be quite ...


24

It's likely the most westward time zone with universities - or at least with a noticeably amount of academic work. Hawaii is in GMT-10, and in GMT-11 there are only a few small island countries, probably without any university. In short, if you put the deadline in Hawaii time, in nearly any place of the world you can just forget the clock and just mind the ...


23

You ask whether it is "legal", but it is probably not a legal matter. You can drop out of an academic program at any time with no legal consequences beyond paying the relevant fees. Unless your acceptance means signing a contract which specifically requires something on your end, I don't see what you could possibly be legally held to. I am not an attorney ...


23

I try to always spell things out like this in my syllabus, and I would hope others do, too. For me, I would excuse a small number of minor things, so long as warning is given in advance, but it wouldn't be a valid excuse on a test or especially major assignment. I don't have a specific clause for activism, nor have I gotten excuses from that activity, but ...


22

The strictness of the deadline strongly depends on the journal and the context of publication. For most papers to most journals, there is potentially a great deal of flexibility (assuming that you ask early and are polite about it). The main exceptions that I have encountered are: High-impact journals sometimes expect you to drop everything else on their ...


19

Yes, it is fine to submit revisions early. The timescale doesn't really come into it. Either the revised paper is good enough for publication, or it is not. The logistics of when you carry out the work and how long it takes are entirely up to you. The important thing is that, in your covering letter, you explain in detail why you have chosen not to follow ...


19

UTC-12 means that it's 12 hours behind UTC. That's the maximum distance in our 24 hour day clock. So UTC-12 is the timezone where calendars end. That's probably the motivation behind using it as a deadline. For example, if the deadline is January 31st UTC-12, then as soon as it's not January anymore anywhere, the deadline has passed. Is UTC-12 the same as ...


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