50

There are many critical scientific resources out there that have massive known flaws, but are still useful because the flaws don't prevent people from getting high value from the resources. GenBank, for example, is the predominant source of genetic information in the world and is also known to have many mislabelled sequences. From what you have written, it ...


17

If you are an R user, you can use the scholar package. This package allows you to analyze data from Google Scholar and obtain citations, publication list and even perform predictions of the h-index. An example R code: library(scholar) id = "xJaxiEEAAAAJ" # Isaac Newton's id cit=get_citation_history(id) barplot(cit[,2],names.arg = cit[,1])


14

According to this article, a student was arrested for downloading ~4 million articles from an on-line database. That was an extreme case. He had history of downloading and releasing large amount of information. In this JSTOR case, I don't think he had actually released the articles, although the indication was strong. He was charged with "unlawfully ...


13

Here's what you're looking for on the U.S. Dept. of Education page in CSV/Excel. Here's the header of the file: Institution_ID Institution_Name Institution_Address Institution_City Institution_State Institution_Zip Institution_Phone Institution_OPEID Institution_IPEDS_UnitID Institution_Web_Address Campus_ID Campus_Name Campus_Address ...


11

Remember that the way the arxiv works, the default paper identifier goes to the most recent version that's been uploaded. So even if Google Scholar caches an older version, it's using the same URL. Now if you make changes like changing the title and/or material parts of the abstract, then it might take a while for the new title to percolate through the ...


9

If you're the legitimate first author of the paper, I wouldn't even bother to find out why the error happened in the first place. Instead, my answer focuses on your question of what to do now. There are two good reasons why you should insist on a correct authorship record: (i) First authorship of a (good) paper is a valuable asset. (ii) So are citations of ...


8

Yes, JSTOR provides a corpus for linguistic (and other) analyses of academic literature, at JSTOR Data for Research See this Language Log discussion of one such analysis done on that corpus.


7

You should contact the person above the database team. The database that you describe seems to be huge and complicated. As such any modification on it can be relatively big and complicated. I've already worked in a place with an atrocious database. The relying architecture was simply badly designed. Everyone was aware of it, however we decided to leave it ...


7

Proposals are usually submitted with the expectation of confidentiality. A database of proposals by a funder is therefore unlikely. Some people choose to publish their grant proposals at time of submissions (me included; RIO Journal is the only place I know that does this).


6

You can find DFG-funded projects on their website via the DFG GEPRIS tool. This only shows the DFG funded projects, for other projects the PI might be involved in, you should check the websites of the respective funding agencies (e.g. CORDIS for those funded by the EU).


6

If an author is very concerned about keeping their data private and anonymous until the last moment before publication, the workflow would be like this: The authors deposit their data in a private repository while they are finalizing the manuscript, before submission. They ensure that the documents and files they upload to the repository do not have their ...


6

Relating to just the AshleyMaddison data, there is a plethora of articles on your exact question. I will summarize the main talking points and provide links at the end. 1. Can I download it? The data is probably public-domain, but it depends on where you live. In some countries like the US, the data itself is publicly accessible and part of a wider ...


6

ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and other publisher or database services allow you to save a search and have any new items matching that be emailed to you (though it may not always be within a day - I vaguely recall that I usually knew about PLOS or ScienceDirect papers before I got the email - often via the Google Scholar alert! Still fairly timely, though.) ...


6

First of all, the main sources of citation data are: Proprietary data sources: Google Scholar Scopus Web of Science (WoS) Open access data: Crossref MEDLINE (focusing on medical papers) Some papers compare the comprehensiveness between these different sources, e.g. see {1,2}. To extract the author affiliations given a DOI, a few options (search for &...


5

The short answer is no. There is no comprehensive list of academic journals, and I doubt there ever will be. The major reason for it is there is no real need as publishing culture varies a lot by field and geography. Plus, in the recent explosion of scholarly publishing, there is probably a new journal every week or so. However there are curated databases ...


5

The fundamental reason for friction is that these are commercially licensed resources, and so the licensors have a strong motive to ensure that only people who've paid for it in some way have access to them. Without that requirement, there'd be no reason to throw up the barriers. The exact ways in which this friction manifests vary a lot - my understanding ...


5

There is no need for it. Or a software that can extract all the figures and build a massive database of data that can put the research into a quick use by engineers or others. This is pretty much what Information Retrieval systems do (Yes, I'm looking at you Google). I worked with interpretation of images through AI in the IR area and finding that ...


5

I don't think this database exists, but you might try searching the literature archives. Databases like Web of Science might help you.


5

Colleges have to keep everything that influences grades of students for a certain time in order to resolve disputes over grades. In our case it is 3 years.


5

If you have access to Web of Science, there is an option to sort by funding agencies. Clicking the "more options" link also allows you to exclude funding agencies. It's not perfect since the last time I used it there were quite a lot of false positives & negatives, but it's better than nothing.


4

What you could do is to host your data on Dropbox. When you try to share a file, you will get a link that you can put into the paper. It seems as if the recipient of the link has no way to see the dropbox user account name/e-mail address of the person who shared it. After acceptance of the publication, you could move the file to your institutional website. ...


4

Nothing ties you, neither ethically nor legally, to publish your new work (your database update) in the same journal as earlier work on the topic. However, if the journal was a good venue for this particular publication some years ago, the same reasons probably still hold, which means it's still a good place to publish your update. If, however, you feel like ...


4

Web of Science is probably marginally more selective; Scopus is a little broader (I routinely get higher numbers of hits in Scopus for comparable searches). My understanding is that Scopus has also made a deliberate attempt to increase its coverage of conference proceedings, which would mean more significant coverage in those disciplines which are very ...


4

I4OC: the Initiative for Open Citations This is probably the leading project to do this, though I believe there have been various proposals in the past. The idea of creating an advocacy group to promote the availability of citation data gained momentum at the 8th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP 2016), in response to a report that ...


4

This answer is assuming you are either interested in or already experienced in entry-level programming. For the programming language Python, a data structure package called Pandas exists. To use it, you can utilize basic python syntax which is not that hard to learn. There is also extensive documentation and online help on SE forums available. When coming ...


4

There is nothing unethical about renaming features unless you do so with the purpose to mislead or fabricate results. It makes perfect sense to rename features to keep a company secret. However, a publication stating (for example): "I have some features and use them to predict manufacturing errors with 99% accuracy" has no value whatsoever: for all ...


4

Copyright almost certainly isn't the correct legal basis here (IANAL, so take that with a grain of salt, but as comments have pointed out, data is not subject to copyright in many jurisdictions), so I would suggest dropping that part of your thinking. The issue is not whether you have copyright of something produced, but whether you were allowed to use the ...


4

The Shibboleth Wikipedia page is a good place to start. Shibboleth is a single sign-on log-in system.... It allows people to sign in using just one identity to various systems run by federations of different organizations or institutions. The federations are often universities or public service organizations. So, Shibboleth is a software program that large ...


3

If you would consider an approach of storing bibliographic information in XML format, either directly (as XML files), or indirectly (via serialization or XML-to-RelationalDB conversion), you might find the following resources of interest (some of the resources are general and/or database-focused): Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) by The Library of ...


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