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4

Following the course will usually not be a problem, since lectures are generally public. Exceptions are, e.g., seminars with a limited number of places. Also, if the lecture hall happens to be too small (highly unlikely) for all the students, you may be expected to leave. Check the examination regulations of the PhD program that you would enroll in. ...


-1

It would depend on the department and the university's policies. You can check their website or mail the staff regarding it


5

I think your question extends beyond programming-related courses and also applies to virtually any course with a significant hands-on laboratory component (think chemistry labs, biology labs, physics labs, etc). The main reason that TAs or lab instructors are used in these subjects is because hands-on instruction does not scale as well as lecture-style ...


4

First, I would challenge your assumptions that professors are not involved in the coding part. Even if they are not directly involved in delivering the labs, many professors are in fact involved in designing the lab classes, including problems that are offered to students. Sometimes professors also include suggestions on how to deal with most common learning ...


2

Probably a matter of opinion, but I would suggest focusing on more general things overall, though you could say that you have well developed ideas for a course in X and in Y. But I think that the teaching statement needs to focus on your teaching philosophy and expertise, rather than details. I say this because what you suggest seems to make you too narrowly ...


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