214

As my experience of being a TA for multiple courses with various profs, such personal gestures of appreciation are welcomed by the professors. I have actually heard professors refer to the email as something that "made their day". As long as you don't refer to your grades, I don't see a reason why someone would misjudge your intentions, especially after the ...


109

Two words: "Office hours." I say to students that, if they need immediate feedback, then they should come to my office hours, everything else will be processed as its turn arises. [During the pandemic, of course, the office hours would be virtual]


98

When responding to emails to people I have not met, I usually copy the name from the signature and add "Dear" in front.


77

Email the professor, they are human too, they like hearing that you enjoyed their class. 1) I...said this in the class evaluations, which the prof will read. Class evaluations are presumably anonymous, an email from you is more personal. 2) More importantly, I recently received my final grade and it was good...If I email now, it might come off as an ...


65

I agree with Anonymous Mathematician: There are lots of non-obvious ways to contribute to a paper, and it never hurts to be generous. But if they really did not contribute to the paper, then there is nothing to acknowledge in the paper. If you really feel you owe them thanks for something that isn't a contribution to the paper, just call and thank them.


60

You don't mention what country you're in and perhaps it might matter, that what's acceptable in one country might not be in another. Here in the US, it's not uncommon to be asked to share a room at a conference or in other professional situations with another attendee of the same sex. But it would never be considered appropriate to ask anyone to share a ...


58

I will just throw in my personal experience about this subject. Three years ago I was taking an undergraduate course with a great professor. I was at a point where I didn't want to continue studying (I won't go deep in this subject), and he changed my mind just by the way he was teaching. He always gave more than he needed to, always pushed us forward and ...


57

Researchers tend to be very busy advising their own students, and often don't have much free time to commit to supervising others. Recognize that you are asking someone who is very busy to spend some of their limited time on something that (1) may or may not be interesting to them, (2) is not part of their "official" professional responsibilities, and (3) is ...


57

It has become quite obvious by now that most researchers are on precarious employment for an extended period of time when starting their career. As mentioned by Michael and Mark, it is very common to find gmail email addresses in scientific publications. I believe that nobody would find that objectionable. Tips, anyway: Do not use party.dinosaur@gmail.com ...


55

First, take time to read this question to understand what does the Corresponding Author mean for different publishers. The definitions vary, but in principle CA is the author who can be contacted about the paper results after the publication, including the long-term period (10+ years). Perhaps, you are the best person to act as a CA for this paper? Do ask ...


55

I see nothing wrong with your reply, it's courteous and points out what rubbed you (rightly) the wrong way. It's a good approach if you want to be professional. In your shoes, I'd have taken twice as long as it usually takes me to finish whatever job the pushy student wants from me, while ignoring any emails during that time (except for - maybe - 'Working on ...


52

At least in my field (theoretical computer science), the corresponding author is often (but not necessarily) the person who did most of the work and prepared the final version of the paper. It is therefore completely normal to have PhD students as corresponding authors.


51

For a salutation in communications written in English, I would suggest using: Dear F. Doe, or Dear Foo Doe, These salutations seem pretty gender-neutral (gender-inclusive) and sound natural to my ear. They avoid any assumptions on the gender or title of the applicant. This is probably close to the form that you are currently using already. Justification ...


42

I feel like you're doing the student a disservice by being so polite in response to an unprofessional email. It's not necessarily your job (unless you're a business professor maybe?) to teach email etiquette, but sending an arrogant-sounding email like that demanding faster attention may absolutely harm that student in the future. If you reply politely, ...


37

The sentence "I understand the topic, most of the current papers and literature I've read on it, and I have done an experiment on a certain cause/effect." does not inspire confidence. How on earth would one do an "experiment" on a "cause/effect" in class field theory? I'm a professional mathematician who knows something about that subject, and I'm ...


36

You can only publish email correspondence in your thesis if all people involved in the email communication agree. Anything else is highly unprofessional and also unethical. On the other hand, if you have clearly demonstrated that the manuscript had an error, there is no need to add those email. You could write that this has been confirmed by the author and ...


35

My solution would be to send one mail. Personalization seems a wasted effort as you don't know the people, I assume. It even seems a bit presumptuous. But put all three authors on the TO: line, not some there and some on the CC:, line. The latter feels like you are picking a lead author and they may not agree with that. With twenty authors, the corresponding ...


34

Write a paper explaining what the errors are and how they invalidate the results of the papers in question, then submit it to a journal with good visibility and get it published. Writing directly to the journal editors is appropriate only if you have good evidence that the errors in question are deliberate (e.g., the authors have fabricated data in order to ...


34

I'd recommend being generous in assessing what counts as a contribution to the paper. If a conversation genuinely wasn't substantive at all (for example, it consisted of nothing but pleasantries over tea), then of course it doesn't deserve thanks in the acknowledgments. However, there are lots of ways of being helpful that do not directly lead to any of ...


33

It is an extremely weird policy, and I never heard of any journal having a policy like this one. I couldn't find a "general rule governing corresponding authors" that would apply to all the journals of the American Chemical Society. In 2012, the editor on chief of ACS Nano wrote, in an editorial called "Who Are Corresponding Authors?", In order to be ...


31

Not strange at all, just don't expect a quick response! A plan of attack can be summarised in the following way: 1) Be specific Make sure your email is brief, polite and clearly outlines why you want to work in their lab in particular. I would recommend searching for a few different labs that do the specific research you're interested in, which you can ...


29

I have mathematically proven that the central assumptions and claims in that series of papers were wrong and/or incomplete. This is a very complicated statement and it is important to understand it in order to know what to do. The two issues are assumptions and claim. People often make assumptions to solve difficult research problems under the assumed ...


29

First, yes, I think you should email them. If you enjoyed their class so much, then it is likely that quite an ammount of work, and effort went in preparing them. Learning that it was enjoyed, and that this work and effort did not go to waste is probably going to make them happy. If you want to avoid any misjudging on your intentions, you should specify a ...


28

We all deal with this curse. Sad as it is, I suspect that your only option is to endure it -- my take is that papers ask you to provide an email address of record in some sort of official way, and playing games like the one you suggest would look inappropriate in this context.


25

This is so highly dependent on particular universities -- let alone particular regions -- that it is probably best just to ask students and faculty what is the culture at their particular university. I will give one example. At most American universities you should begin by calling all your instructors by "Dr." or "Professor", although in some cases your ...


25

Good luck with your research project, it sounds really cool. I'm a math professor and occasionally get emails from people asking me for help, and in fact recently entered a brief email correspondence with a high school student who asked me some questions. So I think I may be able to offer some useful insights in connection with your question. Is there ...


23

The canonical reference for this subject is Debrett's (via the Wayback Machine). They recommend that a letter to a knight should begin "Dear Sir [given name]," regardless of whether they have other titles such as "professor". In fact, they advise against mixing titles granted by the sovereign (such as knighthoods and ranks in the armed forces) with titles ...


22

In the future, you could tell the students at the start of term that it may take several days to reply to emails, and that if there is something urgent they should speak to you right after class or during office hours. This should still work during the pandemic when all is online.


21

I am a PhD student, and I was the corresponding author on a paper published during my postbac [and my supervisor was a coauthor]. No one will think of it as improper or unethical. You are university affiliated, so there should be no problems there. And as long as the work is high quality and is reasonable (has your supervisor/other expert/faculty read over ...


20

You're overthinking this. It's almost always appropriate to thank somebody if you appreciate the work they've done. In this case, where the professor has made a specific effort to help you personally, thanking them would be absolutely appropriate. Note: "appropriate" not "mandatory". It would also be appropriate to not thank them, since they were "just ...


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