122

would be advisable to add a note that the implementation of THEIR algorithm is our implementation Absolutely yes. This provides important context for your experimentation and as such, is valuable information for the reader. Even better, you could make your implementation of their algorithm publicly available, so that future groups of authors will not ...


106

I suspect I know which conference you are talking about (I am in the Program Committee) :) Answering questions in the rebuttal phase of conferences is a newly emerging skill. Almost any paper faces the issue that you are facing - rebuttals are strictly word-limited, and the reviews / questions are waaaaay too long to clarify everything. A good strategy for ...


92

Let's see: You wrote a paper of sufficient writing quality that it was chosen for presentation at a conference and publication. None of the peer reviewers noticed anything wrong with it. None of the people in the audience questioned it. Your supervisor saw nothing wrong with it. You gave an excellent presentation. You found a flaw in a paper that had ...


80

As a software engineer, I'll give the dissenting opinion. Source code is not an algorithm. It's a "dusty mirror" version of something which hopefully is the algorithm they intended and which hopefully performs correctly. Software being software, and coders being human, there are many ways in which those "hopefully" parts may not be as expected. It is ...


64

As an advisor, I regularly use my students’ slides when I present my current projects. This is usually done within the context of high level presentations: I’m working on important project X; Alice and I worked on X.a which resulted in such and such, and with Bob on X.b which resulted in so and so. Claire and I are working with Alice to extend to X.c. If ...


63

Let's flip this question around and imagine that you, as a first year anthropology PhD student, are now visiting your high school. One of the students asked your former teachers if you would be interested in a local, anthropology-related research project they were doing (e.g., they could be investigating the attitudes of people towards those who are HIV ...


61

Yes. I had a similar experience where my agency restricted travel and did not allow me to present. In my case, I listed that the presentation was delivered by someone else who could attend. Matching the style of your CV, I would write something like: Academic, F. My cool title. Awesome conference. City, State. March 2020. Invited oral presentation. ...


55

This is a highly sensitive topic, see Brian Borchers' comment: As a practical matter, even if the publishers of the conference proceeding were willing to keep your identity secret it would probably be relatively easy for officials from your country to determine your identity. It's likely that the publisher will want to avoid having any responsibility for ...


55

How about using something other than Zoom? Other softwares support features that can help with this. Moreover there are some serious security and privacy concerns about Zoom (see e.g. this statement by the FBI and this investigation by the NY attorney general; Bruce Schneier has written an overview of the concerns here). In our department we use ...


47

Attempting to fit the material of your paper into a talk is a common mistake: even for shorter papers, there is typically simply too much to include all of the significant details. Instead, I recommend thinking of your talk as an advertisement for your paper. Your goal is to present enough of the key interesting material to be able to convince somebody that ...


45

As someone who has given a fair number of talks and has now had the "pleasure" of giving an online talk, I can say that the advantages of in-person talks include the following. You can have informal chats with people from the audience. One of the main problems of online chatrooms is that there usually can be only one discussion at the same time. This ...


43

It depends on the venue. In a small room, you can easily wander around and get back to your poster quickly if you spot someone interested. In a huge conference hall, if you abandon your poster you may never know who visited it and when. So, if you have a large venue, ask yourself, what is your priority: to get your work out and have a chance of presenting ...


38

The #1 criterion is: they come from someone whose name you recognize as a respected colleague in the field. Or, at least, a conference or a journal that you know already. The #2 criterion is: they look like they are not written automatically. Compare Dear Arthur, I have seen your very interesting article on shiny rocks and I would like to invite you... ...


37

Under no circumstances can it be ok to submit with his name on it but without his explicit consent. This wouldnt be ok if he'd be enthusiastic about your research, and if he is not particularly fond of it, this will quite certainly end badly. If you are confident that your advisor did not contribute to the planned submission in a meaningful way, the default ...


37

I do not know which AC manages my submission. All I can do is to contact PC. Therefore... Should I contact PC about this before submitting my rebuttal Yes, or more broadly: use whatever contact information you have for the organizers. There is no point in rebutting an editorial mistake.


35

Relax. You're not the first person to make a mistake, and people are not likely to know that you had been celebrating (besides, even if you were ... so what?). The fact that you found the error yourself is furthermore a good sign, since it means you're taking your work seriously and subjecting it to the scrutiny it deserves. Take a look at this. The first ...


34

The basic idea is simple: reviewers have no incentive to write good reviews apart from their desire to see the conference succeed. Seeing an abundance of short, superficial reviews with a high acceptance rate indicates a low quality conference. An alternative explanation might be that this is a non-archival conference, often referred to as a workshop. In ...


34

Bring some post-its and a pen. Stay at your poster for half an hour. If you have people to talk to, continue talking to those people. If time frees itself up, write on a postit that you will be browsing other posters for half an hour, and you will be back for discussion at X o'clock. Other interested people can still look at your poster, and return at that ...


33

Most computer science conferences expect that, except in extraordinary circumstances, at least one author will present the paper in person. The paper is also, in most cases, published in the proceedings, possibly on paper and distributed to some set of people, such as a special interest group. The reason for this is that we highly value collaboration and ...


32

You can write any name, and no one will check your ID. The reality is that you can submit a paper to any scientific journal under a fake name, and no one will ever check whether your name is real. Also, I do not remember having to show my ID to any conference organizers. If you want to be able to later claim the authorship (e.g., after you become a citizen ...


32

None of the CS conferences I have ever submitted to had ever been lenient on page limits. There are often automatic checkers that will not allow you to upload a paper that exceeds the page limits. Conference guidelines are usually very clear and unambiguous, go and read them. Some conferences allow an appendix or a link to additional material that reviewers ...


30

I echo the other answers: Yes, the standard is that an author needs to attend the conference and physically present the work. If you don't have the time/money/energy/childcare/visa to do that, then hopefully one of your coauthors can go. In a pinch, a non-author may be able to present. However, ultimately, if no one is able to attend and present, then you ...


25

Here are some models I am aware of; combinations of these also exist: There is a sponsor (e.g. government, local university or some academic organization) that covers part of the expenses but their rules for sponsoring are such that you cannot make surplus. You will need to return some of the sponsor money back to them so that the bottom line is non-...


24

Great question; however, I don't think there is any consensus opinion as to how good online conferences are. You might, however, read this blog post by Daniel Litt. He was an organizer of the Western Algebraic Geometry Online conference, held via Zoom this April. It was quite large, with around a thousand participants, and in my opinion very successful. ...


22

The features discussed in the comments seem sufficient in the case that the organizer knows the participants, e.g. classes, committee meetings, etc. I don't think this question has a single right answer. I'm going to answer for the case where the conference is open to interested academics and the organizer doesn't know all the potential participants. This ...


21

I don't think you actually need a reason to decline. Saving the work for submission elsewhere is perfectly reasonable in any case. All you need to reply is "No, thank you". Posters are good for preliminary work and for students wanting some exposure and an opportunity to meet other researchers, of course. But the work is yours and you don't need to ...


21

Others have mentioned that in most cases there's no real issue with submitting under a fake identification. As user111955 points out, the technical details of how to handle this are complex and you should certainly seek help with this. But, while it's pretty much impossible for any individual (even security experts) to know everything they need to know about ...


19

My advisor told me that if I contact PC for this reason, it might be interference. Your advisor is mistaken. If you had contacted the Program Committee chair trying to influence the refereeing process - yes, that would have been inappropriate. But it is actually very common for authors to contact PC chairs, for a variety of reason: Problems with the paper ...


19

Sadly, what the university should do, what it can do, and what it is willing to do might all be different. In a perfect world, yes, they should fund you. However, there may be limited funds or even regulations that bind their decision. Also, your relationship with the supervisor might be an issue if they don't think that this is worthwhile for you or them. ...


18

Someone should probably stay by your poster throughout. If there is no one there it won't generate much of any interest. Posters are seldom so self explanatory that people will gain much without a bit of help. Perhaps a colleague or even your professor would be willing to help you out for a portion of the time required. But it should be someone who can ...


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