29

[As per suggestion of user151413, comment converted into response] A few sanity checks to run: Ask them who else is in your session and with which topics, if possible. Check the participant list or the confirmed speakers. I know established researchers that had been taken in by junk conferences. If a junk conference manages to get a lot of good speakers, ...


25

If you are invited as an "invited speaker" or "honourable speaker" and the conference organizers still ask you to pay a registration fee to give your talk, that is likely a scam. The reason is that as an invited guest, you would expect some kind of preferential treatment over regular attendees. Otherwise, you are just another speaker for ...


5

How big is the conference? Has it happened before? Check your university library for proceedings of past events. If this is the first occurrence of this conference, that's a warning sign. If the proceedings of past events show similar things to your work, that's a good sign. If the previous events had several researchers close to your level, that's a good ...


5

Insist may be the wrong approach. Given your #3 and #4 above, he may have a valid claim on it. You can ask, of course, and you can appeal to his "better nature" that it will boost your future prospects. That might be a win. But if you balance off his good will and support against first authorship of a single paper it may turn to your profit to ...


4

Congress: A very big meeting (more than 10,000 or at least several thousands of attendees), usually held every few years. Conference: A big meeting (hundreds or a couple of thousands of attendees), usually held annually. Symposium: A meeting on a specific interest/topic. Due to the focused field, usually not very big meetings. Often, conferences or ...


3

A good portion of reputable conferences are run by national/international "learned societies" (e.g. American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, Institute of Physics (UK), etc.). Although this isn't a sure-fire way to identify junk conferences, you can be reasonably sure that conferences organized by the well-known societies in your ...


1

There are several questions hidden within this one. The first is whether you retain copyright after the abstract appears. If not, and if the figure is fairly substantial (in the information conveyed and in design elements) then you may need to seek permission from the copyright holder to reuse it. And you will also, then, need to cite the abstract. This is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible