30

[As per suggestion of user151413, comment converted into response] A few sanity checks to run: Ask them who else is in your session and with which topics, if possible. Check the participant list or the confirmed speakers. I know established researchers that had been taken in by junk conferences. If a junk conference manages to get a lot of good speakers, ...


26

If you are invited as an "invited speaker" or "honourable speaker" and the conference organizers still ask you to pay a registration fee to give your talk, that is likely a scam. The reason is that as an invited guest, you would expect some kind of preferential treatment over regular attendees. Otherwise, you are just another speaker for ...


6

Contact with the IEEE conference mail and the edas system as soon as possible. The edas mail is: help@edas.info The IEEE conference you should search in its website. At contact section probably. If there's an incongruence between the document and the system they would detect it, but there's no guarantee. So, notify them there was an erratum before the ...


5

How big is the conference? Has it happened before? Check your university library for proceedings of past events. If this is the first occurrence of this conference, that's a warning sign. If the proceedings of past events show similar things to your work, that's a good sign. If the previous events had several researchers close to your level, that's a good ...


5

Insist may be the wrong approach. Given your #3 and #4 above, he may have a valid claim on it. You can ask, of course, and you can appeal to his "better nature" that it will boost your future prospects. That might be a win. But if you balance off his good will and support against first authorship of a single paper it may turn to your profit to ...


4

A good portion of reputable conferences are run by national/international "learned societies" (e.g. American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, Institute of Physics (UK), etc.). Although this isn't a sure-fire way to identify junk conferences, you can be reasonably sure that conferences organized by the well-known societies in your ...


4

Is this common? Not getting a visa to enter the country where a conference is held, is quite common. It is not common for someone to ask for their money back months after a conference though: while people do occasionally get delayed in asking for their money back, usually this is done immediately after finding out that you won't be able to attend the ...


4

Congress: A very big meeting (more than 10,000 or at least several thousands of attendees), usually held every few years. Conference: A big meeting (hundreds or a couple of thousands of attendees), usually held annually. Symposium: A meeting on a specific interest/topic. Due to the focused field, usually not very big meetings. Often, conferences or ...


3

It seems that 77 journals use Editorial Express. Given that there are tens of thousands of scholarly journals, it does not seem to be immensely popular. Anyway, one Editorial justifies the adoption of Editorial Express. It might answer parts of your question: We have decided to use Editorial Express, developed by Professor John Rust at the University of ...


3

I would recommend against this. Not that it is wrong, but that it is unlikely to get you anything you can't get yourself from a literature search. Most such conferences are recurring, perhaps annual. Find the proceedings of the conference for the previous few years and see what you find. The abstracts of articles may be enough to see what the landscape looks ...


3

The worst case is that you are accused by someone of plagiarism. And that is pretty bad. But you don't ask for solutions, though user Younes provides one in a comment. Contact the organizers, explaining the situation, apologizing and asking for a correction. The organizers, if they have any experience, will have dealt with submission problems in the past and ...


1

There are several questions hidden within this one. The first is whether you retain copyright after the abstract appears. If not, and if the figure is fairly substantial (in the information conveyed and in design elements) then you may need to seek permission from the copyright holder to reuse it. And you will also, then, need to cite the abstract. This is ...


1

There is no requirement that a person be employed in academia to publish papers or submit them to academic venues, including conferences. Papers are supposed to be reviewed for their own qualities and insights, not the position or reputation of the authors (though some abuses occur). But before submitting to any venue, you should spend some effort looking at ...


1

Your only recourse is to contact the conference chairs. If you had a paper accepted to the proceedings (as opposed to an abstract/poster) then this sounds like a case where most reasonable conference chairs would either include your paper or refund you. However, the conference does have terms for registration and inclusion in the proceedings, and it sounds ...


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