159

Who presents a work should not affect its authorship. Authorship is determined by the contribution to the publication. That work is complete at the time when the publication is accepted and the camera-ready is submitted. Now, it is entirely reasonable (and in fact common) for a paper to be presented by somebody other than the first author, and it's quite ...


158

I am really hesitant to discuss my financial shortcomings with Prof. M, or else he assumes that I can afford the travel. I think you need to get past this. You do not have financial shortcomings, you just don't have money. Working on a PhD without family financial support, with existing student debt, and with limited school support is not easy. I respect ...


125

Absolutely. It helps, though, to be a little context sensitive. If you've just come from an amazing presentation and want to talk about it to someone else, then "did you just hear that great talk by/about X?" is a good way to start the conversation, better than just "Hello" or "Great conference, eh?" If you know who the person is (they're speaking, you ...


123

would be advisable to add a note that the implementation of THEIR algorithm is our implementation Absolutely yes. This provides important context for your experimentation and as such, is valuable information for the reader. Even better, you could make your implementation of their algorithm publicly available, so that future groups of authors will not ...


118

How to save face? Have more high quality papers than poor ones. People understand that a student's first paper is not necessarily outstanding, especially if his/her supervisor is more about quantity than quality. So it reflects more badly on your supervisor than you as long as you have the 'student' badge on. However, you can only wear the 'student' badge ...


114

I feel the first step is to calm down and to stop exaggerating. Seeing this as an "evil mistake" and a "predicament" that's "embarrassing" is really, really over the top for just having published a paper that's correct but uninteresting at a low-competition conference from a reputable publisher. As you say yourself - "when ...


113

If somebody asks a dumb question, they're not going to feel good about the interaction whatever happens. If possible, get them back on the right track but avoid saying anything that could be interpreted as sarcasm and move on as quickly as possible. The most likely thing is either that the questioner has missed something obvious or misunderstood something ...


111

I think that it is important to recognize that the biggest value of the award is its contribution to your C.V. and future career, not the prize money. As such, I think you should approach the question of the money as generously as possible: after all, you gave a good talk, but many of the aspects of that good talk depended critically on the contributions of ...


107

Keep asking the dumb questions! It is better to look like a fool, than to be one. You worry that many speakers are annoyed at the `elementary' questions. Some speakers do it because they are stressed about public talking, and any question upsets them. For some, communication of mathematics is not the aim of the talk; they give it because it is a condition ...


106

I suspect I know which conference you are talking about (I am in the Program Committee) :) Answering questions in the rebuttal phase of conferences is a newly emerging skill. Almost any paper faces the issue that you are facing - rebuttals are strictly word-limited, and the reviews / questions are waaaaay too long to clarify everything. A good strategy for ...


104

No, it is not acceptable. You can of course email the organisers and ask if you can participate without paying, but do not be surprised if they say no. (Please note that conference registration fees cover lots of things besides the lunch. Among others, conference registration fees may cover the rent of the hall in which you are sitting, and expenses ...


104

Congrats on your paper. No, it wouldn't destroy your career but it would be awkward and embarrassing. It could potentially hurt your career if the mistake was the result of obvious sloppiness, gross incompetence, and worst of all, outright dishonesty. But for the first two of those, the damage would very likely be containable and if you keep doing research, ...


93

Give it to a relative (parent, spouse?). My mother has a "wall of Sergio" in the house where she displays different types of significant awards, letters, etc. I think it's a little weird, but giving them these awards is a nice way to let them have a handy reminder of what you're up to at the time, and parents certainly appreciate it sometimes. My mother and ...


92

Let's see: You wrote a paper of sufficient writing quality that it was chosen for presentation at a conference and publication. None of the peer reviewers noticed anything wrong with it. None of the people in the audience questioned it. Your supervisor saw nothing wrong with it. You gave an excellent presentation. You found a flaw in a paper that had ...


87

Before asking a question, ask yourself the following: If I get a nice detailed and understandable answer to this question, will I be able to understand a significant part of the rest of the talk? If the answer is "no", then you should probably not ask the question even if there really is some ambiguity that could be cleared up, because chances are that ...


84

Print it locally. Hopefully, your conference is in a city of some non-negligible size and not in the middle of nowhere. Find a copy shop in the city and print your poster there. Large conferences may even have their own on-site printing, although a last-minute print job may be expensive or even unavailable. Some people do this in any case, so that they ...


83

As a software engineer, I'll give the dissenting opinion. Source code is not an algorithm. It's a "dusty mirror" version of something which hopefully is the algorithm they intended and which hopefully performs correctly. Software being software, and coders being human, there are many ways in which those "hopefully" parts may not be as expected. It is ...


82

There is no such thing as a dumb question is a good adage for the classroom, where our mission is to teach students, and we have a number of weeks to accomplish the learning objectives. We use this maxim to encourage students to ask questions rather than fall behind. However, there is such a thing as an annoying question can be an equally true corollary, ...


81

A conference has a number of limited slots for presentations. When your paper is accepted for a conference, someone else's paper got rejected, because it was slightly worse than yours and slots were limited. In this sense, if you are not going to present your accepted paper, this a huge disservice to the conference (and the related community). As I already ...


80

I cannot talk about general customs, but for whatever it’s worth, a major conference in my field is held in a ski resort, off-season. This has two advantages: This is what the resort does to survive during the warm seasons. Therefore I presume that it may be a relatively cheap option. Except for hiking, there is nothing to do there. With conferences held in ...


72

Is there an etiquette regarding this? Should someone accept a presentation on a conference if they won't be able to be present for the whole duration? There aren’t really any universally agreed-upon rules for such things, but as a general rule: If the conference organizers are paying any expenses for your attendance (such as travel or accommodation), it is ...


71

First, some conferences have really strict timing and you will be given no extra time. Second, if there is important slide or two, just do it. But make sure that you only slightly extend your time (e.g. 10%). If you are going to extend it by 50%, or 200% (I saw that, and I was pissed at both the speaker and even more - the chair for allowing that) - please, ...


71

When I attend talks where the quality of the presentation is poor, I like to use it as an opportunity to learn about what not to do in a presentation. I have an ongoing list of "things not to do in a presentation", with examples from talks I've attended. I just take out the list and add to it whenever I attend one of these presentations. I find it helpful ...


71

Yes, participating in such a boycott can come at a personal cost. That is true for any boycott; the existence of this cost is what makes the boycott worthwhile in the first place. If there was no cost at signing such a pledge, it would be much less impressive if many people sign. However, again as with any boycott, as O. R. Mapper says, the marginal cost ...


70

When I am chairing a session, I always check a few minutes beforehand to ensure that all of the speakers are there. That's also a good time to check on pronunciation of names. Just say something like: Can you please say your name for me? I'd like to pronounce it right when I introduce you. Then it will be fresh in your mind, there'll be a decent ...


69

Firstly, I should note that the examples you give are certainly somewhat agressively formulated (more so than would be common in my field), but not in themselves invalid questions. It is certainly "allowed" to be critical of the presented work, and there is nothing the session chair can or should do about this. As a speaker, it always helps to think in ...


66

How should you talk about the weakness? Honestly. This doesn't mean you need to dwell on it or undermine all the rest of this talk around your point. But if you know about a serious weakness, you shouldn't be afraid to acknowledge it when necessary. Yes, your work will appear less awesome as a result. But which of these two scenarios would you rather ...


66

When this happens to me, I just describe it as "work in progress" or a "research attempt" and present what I can with what I've got. What's wrong with that? That's how research works. "...hasn't panned out like I hoped it would when I accepted the talk." You can say this during your talk, and explain why it didn't pan out, and ask the audience if they ...


64

I've seen this before and it can work very well. Your only task in the one minute slot is to convince people that they should come and see your poster. Say what you've been doing and why it's interesting. You could use your abstract as a starting point but don't just read it out. Keep the slide really simple with the paper title and authors and a single, ...


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