62

Such a website is itself an ad: for the lab, the lab's research, and for the personnel running/working at the lab. In many ways, a lab website is like a resume. While it's not unusual for newsletters published by some local org (say, a school, church, youth group, etc) to have local ads to cover publishing costs from the neighborhood dental clinic, grocer, ...


10

I'm not quite as negative as the other current answers here. I don't think it is unethical, for example, provided that the domain is your own. Weird, perhaps. But, a warning. Don't sign up with some ad "service" that has the ability to place ads on your site according to their judgement, not yours. You will regret it pretty quickly, I'd guess. ...


7

A principle in rhetorics and the art of persuasion states that it is useful to preemptively address any criticism that you expect will be leveled at you after you make your argument, by raising the objection yourself and then explaining why it’s not valid while you are making the argument in the first place. * If you do this in a thoughtful way, a potential ...


6

I don't think I would call it "unethical," but certainly weird and borderline unacceptable. While I'm sure the idea is to just recoup server costs; it would strike me as very weird to try and profit off visits to your personal website and I would probably avoid visiting it again. If you were being interviewed, I can't see it being a positive. Also ...


3

I'll focus on the editor-in-chief because the role of the associate editor is journal-dependent. Not every journal pays the editor-in-chief, but many do. It's generalizing, but if the journal is making solid profits then there's a good chance the editor-in-chief is paid. An order of magnitude estimate is about $10k/year. That also explains why editorial ...


3

To the best of my knowledge, only the very largest and prestigious journals (say, Science, Nature, JMA, NEJM, etc.) have editors-in-chief that are salaried. For sure, in mathematics and computational science (my fields), none are paid -- although we are paid by our universities and the work we do for the job of associate editor or editor-in-chief is simply ...


2

It sounds like your problem is that peer reviewers are criticizing your research topic instead of the content of your research. The only things you can do about that are: submit your work to venues that specialize in your research topic. change your topic. Ultimately, the peer review system allows people to write poor quality reviews. There is nothing ...


2

It is possible, but difficult. Possibly very difficult. On the other hand, if you can get the process started it can accelerate moderately quickly. The problem is to make the first contact and convince someone that you have interesting ideas and who will be willing to communicate with you over the long run. Blind emails to people are a poor strategy, since ...


2

My question is that what are the possibilities for an independent researcher (in a developing country) to have access to scientific communities? To have discussions, get reviews, etc. ? To get reviews, you need to submit manuscripts to journals. In addition, setting up a profile at scholarly 'social media'-like sites might help, e.g. ResearchGate. Some ...


2

One of your best bets would be to find some active SubReddits, Discord, and GitHub communities. Without university infrastructure, it’s a very steep challenge. Even with my suggestions, you become increasingly limited by what you’re able to do.


1

IGDORE, a large organization for independent scientists, hosts an online forum titled On Science and Academia. This is by far the largest online meeting place for independent scientists to my knowledge. IGDORE membership is not required to participate. I am not a member of IGDORE, and I have seen others with traditional university affiliations participate as ...


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