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2

Just say it like you have here. Thanks, I'm seeking funding, I'll need some time. The professor understands that time is needed. It would be good, however, that you say you will let him know as soon as you have more information, but in, say, three months in any case. If you want to do more, ask him to point you to any papers that you might study during ...


2

I'd suggest you make an appointment with your director or studies or ombudsman (or whoever else is in charge). You should explain the problem to them in an honest way like you did in this question, and ask them what are your options and what they recommend. At the very least you need to inform them that there are some issues with your supervisor, so that ...


2

However, come time for the actual conference, my advisor had switched projects on me, and what I presented was nothing at all related to the session of that day. changed her mind when I went out and actually got an offer she will take my inquiries as a personal attack The past few years feel like a textbook definition of Gaslighting Your ...


1

That really sucks. I had a messy situation during my MSc which took me over 3 years, in part due to supervisors being flimsy and in part due to me losing my own motivation. There was also a project which changed direction halfway through, into the exact opposite of what I wanted. I had told them ahead of time, that the one thing I refused to do was work ...


1

It depends a lot on your relation with your prof. I'd say something like "I spotted you got the xxx grant - congratulations!" when meeting them on the floor, or add something similar at the end of an email that you would have sent anyway (planning the next meeting, asking for feedback, etc) - don't overthink it.


4

If you feel like congratulating your professor, go ahead and do it. He might appreciate it, or in the worst case he will ignore because he has too many emails in his inbox. But I cannot imagine a scenario where the professor would take such a congratulation email negatively. As with most emails to busy people: keep the email short and to the point. Just one ...


0

Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do if the first author does not want to submit the paper. This is the risk of being a co-author, you always rely on the first author. If the researcher does not want to continue on this paper anymore it's pointless and disrespectful to push. What I can suggest is to take only your contribution and prepare your own ...


0

Let me suggest a few things. First, having some teaching experience is useful for most beginning academics. So a TA has value in itself. It shouldn't be hard to "sell" that. However, the professor now funning you has no input into who is a TA. That is normally a department decision. You apply there for a position, not to a particular professor. You may have ...


2

Possibly not related to your case, but I have had somewhat similar experience before. One aspect you maybe haven't considered, and maybe more or less likely depending on the field, is if there was some underlying issue with the paper or results themselves. I have had a case or two, most often when working with newer students, that a seemingly great paper ...


4

I suggest that you try to get the professor to arrange a three way meeting to resolve the issues. I'd also suggest that you be generous about who is a co-author and even who is first. Any forward movement is probably better for you than letting it go. There will always be other papers and you might be able to use this as a basis for future work if you can ...


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