220

Have each person grade different questions, not different students. Consistency in grading is important, and it is unfair to the students if their grades depend substantially on the allocation of their work to a grader. For this reason, if you must split grading duties with another colleague for a particular assessment item, it is best to split the grading ...


147

Don't give in to Imposter Syndrome! Both your reasons are fundamentally not sound. Somebody nominated you for an award. The awards committee thinks you are deserving. You should not refuse the award simply because you think others may be more deserving. It's the task of the award committee to establish this, and their decision was you. Rejecting the award ...


139

Use impersonal language Hopefully this is obvious, but make sure that your language focuses on the ideas rather than the people. Rather than I don't think you're grasping the subtleties of the situation try I think that there are some extra complications that need consideration in this case Ask questions Rather than taking a confrontational approach, try ...


128

"The only real critique I had on my thesis was that the chapter I sent you had typos. I went through this chapter again and found quite a few. In the future when someone asks you to review a chapter you need to carefully check and find typos because it's embarrassing to send a final thesis with a chapter filled with typos. Its disappointing when you ...


123

Work with both John and Sam on the same paper. You all have something to offer, so pool your efforts and work together.


89

Is it okay to work on colleagues' ideas after they leave academia? I'm going to be blunt: yes, absolutely yes. What is the other option? That the progress of humanity should be stifled because you didn't get a job? Ideas do not belong to anyone. The way I read it, you did not even come up with the idea independently, but "with some guidance from a ...


64

While we cannot conclusively determine whether or not you would have deserved co-authorship, for the reasons others mentioned (number of authors on the paper, the time you invested into this project, etc.), it seems likely that you should have been one - or at the very least acknowledged. Now, let me share with you my hunch why that never happened, and how ...


63

Will declining a research award be problematic for myself or other people? It's problematic in the sense that it would very likely be a mistake, and undermine the goal that the award is trying to achieve, to the detriment of yourself (mainly) and to a lesser extent of the scientific community you belong to. In a system that is supposed to function as a ...


63

You don't owe this person anything, were under no obligation to help them, and everything you do for them is done in a spirit of generosity and kindness. If they don't think you did a good enough job, that's their problem, not yours. If they don't want your help, they are under no obligation to ask for it. It sounds to me that you did it exactly right, ...


58

You're right that many academics (and I suppose not only academics) somehow systematically fail to encourage their colleagues, and do not congratulate their successes. Ideally, yes, at least "mentors" would do so, all the more in light of the general failure. But, in my experience, mentorship is not to be reliably expected. Sadly. Let's not bother ...


52

You should first find out what is the standard convention for when you have to vacate the room. Since the other instructor is in your department, you can take this up at the department level: talk to your advisor and/or a trusted faculty mentor about it. In my experience though this is often left a little fungible and people need to be reasonable about ...


50

It happens all the time, and I see no problem whatsoever. I can understand that you might feel uneasy with your supervisor joining, but nevertheless, I do not think it is inappropriate in any way (we are talking about a normal beach where also families would go, right?). Besides, a beach is a public place, so even if you somehow wanted to prevent your ...


49

This is a partial solution I've used myself, and it assumes a few things: You access your clusters remotely through a connection (like other answers pointed, cloud servers or remote), so where you work isn't exactly the bottleneck. The software you use isn't OS dependent or has any special licenses You do not have a ton of things hooked up from serial ...


46

In a comment, you say The problem is I worry that accepting might shine a light on my research not being quite there just yet and people would look at my bibliometrics and think poorly of me, if I hadn't accepted then I'd just be yet another researcher, if that makes sense. I'm not using the bibliometrics as a yard stick for research quality, but rather ...


41

It's certainly reasonable to send another email just saying that you would really like to visit, and that you would like to take up the old invitation. By far the most likely thing is that the professor in question just forgot, and will appreciate being reminded.


40

Your project is nice, but I now decided for myself that I can't invest more time in it. I'm too busy with other projects which have priority for my current research interests (so, talking to my advisor won't fix the issue). And just repeat that same basic point when he tries to argue/discuss with you.


40

I think the issue you are facing is an important life lesson I had to learn (just an opinion). I think the real root of this issue is you feel bad. You don't like the idea of letting the other person down, and it makes you feel obligated. Maybe what I am stating is obvious, because if you weren't interested, and you felt comfortable saying no, then you would ...


39

I'm not a native English speaker but I do understand your frustration. Here are some of my experiences: Embrace the elephant in the room Time to time I found people around me are too "polite" to not tell me that they don't understand what I say. I have had a course evaluation saying that "the instructor is great but time to time I had hard time understand ...


36

I think this is just the way academics normally behave. We tend to work in silos. Those in different silos don't understand our work. Those in the same silo just take success for granted. Win the Nobel in Chemistry or Economics and you will get congratulated, but not for much less than that. Win a local award and people will cheer you on (Teacher of the Year,...


35

Shared first authors are listed alphabethically, at least that's what makes sense, otherwise they are not shared first authors!! I'd go with that no doubt. From your comments I would say that your are the Experiment person, as you seem to be diminishing the role of the Theory person (he/she simply did so and so...). From your description, the Theory person ...


35

Pick the most appropriate of your mentors, write to ask if they are willing to look it over for you. Don't send it to "experts" you don't know, and don't send it to lots of people at once. Wait until you hear back to submit to a journal.


33

This can really only be answered by you. But here are some thoughts. There are two doors. One leads to a doctorate and the other does not. If there is no path to the first door, then the decision should be clear. But there are a couple of possible paths to that first door. One is to move elsewhere or get a different advisor. If that path isn't closed to ...


30

I will try to present yet another approach than the ones in the answers above. I don't consider it a definite solution, rather a way to go that may work for someone and may not for someone else. (And also, I would much more prefer to speak to someone higher-up, if you can; that's what the other answers discuss.) The thing is: Be honest, but without judging ...


27

Solve the social things by being proactive. Go to your colleagues individually, after committee meetings, or during their office hours, introduce yourself as the new guy, and offer to buy them lunch or a coffee. If colleagues go to lunch after departmental meetings, politely see if you can tag along. The "somehow" in your question is indicative of someone ...


26

You have a lot of questions interspersed within your question, but it sounds like the main issue is the research area of the group is very diverse, every time I just listen on something I cannot understand and have totally no interest on it, and I believe other members think the same way as I do when I am presenting. I have had the same problem in the ...


26

You have a legitimate complaint (you are not there to teach that stuff). However, that's surrounded by misconceptions that I'd like to correct. Philip Guo's has written excellently on the topic and I recommend his post; I'll apply his idea to what you describe (which is a part of your actual case). There are two explanations for the situation you described: ...


26

Try to start a cultural shift in your area Others seem to be implying that this is just "how things are" in academia and you should accept it and move on. It's easier to say that when you have reached a high, respected position in your field, have published countless papers, received awards, given keynote presentations, etc. At that point, for the ...


26

I don't know if this is much of an answer, but it's become more than will fit in a comment. If you just joined in Fall 2020, it's not unusual that you haven't made the kind of connections you're looking for yet, especially given the challenges of the pandemic. I'm a PhD student, and I'm sure it's very different for faculty than for students, but I'm not ...


26

Your “friend” is no friend to you at all, and behaved unethically in promising you coauthorship and making other promises that he has not kept, and that it’s not clear he had any intention of keeping. The other answers analyze at length whether you being a coauthor makes sense or not, but that seems beside the point to me. You were promised to be made a ...


25

That student's response is obviously unnaceptable and quite rude. You should gently remind the student that ultimately they are responsible for their own work when they submit a document and if editing was so important to him/her next time they should hire an editor. That being said, in the future it's a nice gesture to let others know ahead of time if you ...


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