16

I have refereed many articles and reading poor English is very unpleasant. It's hard enough to understand the ideas the article is presenting without language making it harder. Also, I have had several advisors and many bosses and uniformly they all valued opinions in this order: opinion from a so-called expert opinion from someone outside the organization ...


8

Maybe you should have a joint session. Both of you sit side-by-side in front of a computer and make the final edits together. You two can discus every formulation. The advantage is, you get a better feeling of what your advisor wants to express, you can help him finding the right words, and you can let it go once you sense anger or other negative vibes.


7

Another alternative is to submit some excerpts with "semi-grammatical" issues to a second opinion of native language and with at least some knowledge on the field and compare with your version of the text. No need to mention the whole situation, just ask which version is clearer/correct. If it happens that they agree with you most of times then ...


5

Plan B: do nothing (since the co-author is more senior) but offer to work on the revision after the paper has been submitted. Any self-respecting editor/reviewer will point out the issues with language. By offering to do the work on the revision following the reviewers' comments, you will have the last say on the language used in the paper (after all, ...


3

My experience with all the collaborations so far: they fail badly if they're forced (as a structure). First, you get motivation to collaborate, and that means specific problems or goals to act upon. Bryan is right - if you have specific, actionable items to produce within the collaboration, that allows for bringing people from different groups together and ...


2

I think it would be a mistake to make assumptions here. Collaborating with such a professor is a real opportunity and you shouldn't leave hard feelings. Professors are busy, but it would be good to contact them again asking if they are still interested and asking them for their suggestion on next steps from both of you. If you have deadlines (as professors ...


2

Since you say senior colleague, Im assuming this is not your professor. If it is there may be little that you can do. Complain to your professor and explain what is happening, he is unlikely to want you wasting your time on this kind of nonsense. If he doesn't step in immediately he is not doing his job. If this doesn't work (unfortunate) then explain the ...


1

There is one very simple solution to your problem. You have to refer to facts not to your own opinion. Such facts could be, for instance, a passage from a respected book in the field. Or an automatic grammar/spell checker such as Grammarly. You can say, I was not sure about my writing, therefore I checked the text with Grammarly. Here are the mistakes. In ...


1

Senior colleague? I'd leave it alone. He wants it that way, so it goes. If there's an issue later, deal with it. Perhaps he's laying claim to a particular point of the publication, as in, "that sounds like Dr. Joe's voice" or something. "I understand that language is not the main priority of a scientific article" True, but we do USE ...


1

A solution one of my professors used was to have herself be the owner of the repo for each team and then just allow each member access. That way they the students could learn to use Git without having control over whether the repo went public or not; they could write to the repo, but not change its settings. (There's really no way around the fact that ...


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