73

It is what it is. You aren't responsible for that. I suggest that you cite it as you would any other work. Presumably you aren't endorsing racist views. You aren't being "kind" by hiding history. The people targeted by such words know they exist, their meaning, and the intent in their use. Scholarly discussions don't contribute to racism unless ...


71

An academic paper published in 2017 had to deal with this issue because it examined this exact work. "The Struggle of Others: Pierre Vallières, Quebecois Settler Nationalism, and the N-Word Today" by Bruno Cornellier was published in Discourse, vol. 39, no. 1, 2017. In the notes Cornellier states: I explain later in the essay the reasons I decided ...


20

Is this for a class? If so I would ask your teacher directly for advice (the way you wrote this question seems appropriate for such an email).


18

If it helps, at the time of this post, this particular work has been cited 210 times (per Google scholar) so you have 210 examples of what other academics have done when citing this book. My own view is that it is preferable to state the title without redaction, but redaction might also be acceptable so long as the citing author clearly states that the ...


15

Maybe sic would help here: The Latin adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed or translated exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous, archaic, or otherwise nonstandard ...


2

The overwhelming majority of journals that use the Chicago style allow you to include "asides" along with source material references. In fact it is quite a common thing. For an example of how references and extra comments can be mixed together into a single footnote, just read any article from Monumenta Nipponica, or JSAH. Nevertheless, do be sure ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible