27

The main problem is that your impressions seem to be incorrect. (At least from my maths perspective) Putting a preprint on arxiv is just that, namely putting up a preprint. Almost everything put on arxiv will be sent of to a peer reviewed venue as well, usually at the same time (there are exceptions, e.g. when people put up non-articles such as lecture notes ...


18

Clarifying note: this addresses the main thrust of question regarding preprints: even in preprint-happy disciplines, preprints are not a replacement for peer-review. It's really just cultural, and in twenty years this will likely look like a silly question to a newer generation of researchers. The preprint movement happened to start in physics, which may ...


16

I do not understand why you find "weird" putting manuscripts in preparation in your CV. In my field, it is perfectly normal and accepted, and I guess in all academia. This is the best way to explain what you did in the last years. It won't be strange at all, especially if you have talks on those results already, as you imply in a comment. These things ...


13

In short, preprints are newer in chemistry due to historical roadblocks. Many chemists (including myself) have put preprints on arXiv for years - although mostly in the theoretical or physical chemistry subdisciplines. ChemRxiv is a new development, starting only in August 2017, mostly because chemistry journals, particularly including American Chemical ...


12

It seems to me that @Mad Jack's comment, though perhaps practical, is unethical. Funding in a PhD program is conditional on one's intention to complete the program. If you accept funding under the expectation that you will take a certain long term action, then if you clearly realize that you no longer have the intention to complete that action then you are ...


11

If you are nearly finished with your papers you are preparing, you can always send them to show that things are in the pipeline. Just make sure to put a note saying "in preparation: DO NOT DISTRIBUTE" or something similar in your manuscripts. Depending on your area 2 papers is not bad, especially if they are really good papers.


11

It depends on many factors: Does the professor have any intense other duties like teaching, committee work, own research, being an editor, writing grants, etc. or can they focus on supervising? Does the professor delegate supervisory work, e.g., do PhD students have postdocs or similar as a first person to go to? Is there a healthy communication and ...


10

I have worked as a postdoctoral fellow in China for two years. My experience was mainly with two institutions -- CAS/Beijing and SCAU/Guangzhou --, but I have visited a few others informally. Thus I write here from my experience as a visiting scholar. My impression is that the academia in China is strongly pressed to produce papers, and that all sorts of ...


8

I struggled with this very issue for my first couple of papers. I'll bet it's the middle part (Methods, Results, Discussion) that you feel doesn't fit the paper you're trying to write. That may because your view of the type of thing that goes into those sections is too narrow. First, it may help to approach the writing a bit differently. Forget about the ...


7

From the help page of the Royal Society of Chemistry: Who can be a referee for my membership application? Preferably a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, however if you do not know a member who can act as referee, a member of a similar professional body can provide a reference. In some cases, a reference from a senior colleague, for ...


7

Most faculty I know have gone through crises of confidence. They know that sometimes you set out to do something that your heart isn't in, and we've seen it plenty of times in students in the department who we wished decided to leave the program for their own sake instead of being miserable for several more years. So if your heart is not in it, tell the ...


6

I am a theoretical physicist reconverted to biology (bioinformatics) in his masters. I am sitting next to computer scientists, mathematicians, chemists... all working on life sciences. Biology is a very complex subject. Most of the concepts are easy, but there are many devils in the details. Ergo, it is very suitable for multidisciplinary work, where people ...


6

For whatever it’s worth, I changed my field between PhD and postdocs as well. In my case, my main goal was to find a thriving field (where I could make some use of my skills and that would match my general interests). My general rationale was this: Most fields produce enough qualified and willing PhD graduates to fill their postdoc needs, against which I ...


6

My opinion. At your age (at any age) planning years ahead is hard. I'd recommend doing what excites you most and what you're best at. That seems to be chemistry. Doors may open (or close) down the road that you can't foresee.


6

I've known people to be in similar circumstances, though due to funding crunches rather than the pandemic. You should be able to work with your graduate program to find a suitable resolution, either with office staff or the chair of the graduate program or someone they designate. There may also be something like a "first year advisory committee" ...


5

There are two entirely separate issues here: Does the journal require a particular format? What's the appropriate narrative with which to present your work? Some journals require a strict organization of sections, while others merely suggest it. If it just suggests, you can do what you think best. If a journal requires a certain organization, though, you ...


5

Why not? What's the disadvantage? An afternoon of paperwork? One extra class you have to take? Compare that to the advantages: Let's say you are looking for work, can't find any in your chosen field (medicine), and so begin looking to work in a chem lab. Being a "medical lab science" major doesn't necessarily mean you know how to do a lot of chemistry, it ...


5

While I am not in Chemistry, I can tell you from a US perspective that there is no such thing as a GRE score that guarantees acceptance. As long as you are above any "minimum score" (which most places are moving away from, but many admission committees reportedly still privately use), it guarantees your GRE won't alone prevent your file from being considered,...


4

According to the German Chemical Society, apparently 90% of master's recipients in chemistry do start doctoral studies afterwards. Partly this is because PhD "admission" is largely not an admissions process at all in Germany. Individual faculty members who receive grants can hire master's recipients as "Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiter" (literally "scientific ...


4

The issue is not "how many" publications you have, but how good (and relevant) they are. If you have two publications that "hit the mark" in your field, you're fine. The rest can be explained by the fact that you were doing a lot of coursework, or maybe teaching. If someone has a bunch of second-rate publications in "general science," that's not going to ...


3

There isn't a single "correct" undergraduate major for people interested in research careers in this field. Any of biology, biochemistry, biomedical science, chemistry, pharmacology, and several others would be fine. Much more important than finding an undergraduate degree with the right "name" would be finding a program where students have the opportunity ...


3

it depends on your contract. In Germany you have a contract as TVL 13. Fulltime netto: 2200-2400 Euro


3

RE the funding issue: (I'm presuming by "support" you mean paid lab work) In regards to feeling bad about the funding. This is something that drives me a bit crazy about academia. In my lab I'm paid 19K for 9 months of work to work on all of my advisor's projects first. That's fine. But can we all be honest about the system and just be real about what PIs ...


3

The best time to tell your advisor is when you are comfortable, and when you have an exit plan that works for you. There's no ethical conundrum involved with waiting until it's convenient for you. PhD programs have attrition rates approaching 50% on average, and any advisor or graduate director who has been doing this for a length of time knows that some ...


3

Chemistry and oceanography are quite closely related, with a lot of people who explicitly overlap the two. A nice example that I happen to be familiar with is Chris Reddy at Woods Hole, who works on marine chemistry, especially in the area of oil spills. There are lots more like him, so I think that a transition via postdoc is entirely feasible to attempt. ...


3

If you are in the EU, most graduate schools typically prefer you to have a Masters degree before applying for a PhD, it is apparently not so necessary in the US. The Masters is however, important for several reasons: You can see if chemical research is what you really want to do, as most undergraduate programmes have no or very limited opportunity for ...


3

Short answer is yes, you probably should take it or a position like it if you want a PhD from a top US school. It sounds like you don't have many or any papers as a coauthor and your current school's reputation is unknown. So, getting a Masters from a US school with a good reputation, even though it may be a smaller institution could give your application a ...


3

Basically you’re asking to write a short letter, comment, or communication. Some, but not all, journals allow for such submissions, although usually they are in response to an existing article in the journal.


3

Do you know if there exists a database for the type of data you are interested in? That would be the easiest way: browse the database until you find an interesting data set, and the paper will likely be referenced by the database entry (if it is a serious database). Here is an analogy with my own field (structural biology): most (if not all) journals ...


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