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190

To further echo one of the comments: Seek professional help. This may be a trained psychologist, or even just a general medical practitioner, who may be able to direct you to another institution if necessary. You may have access to mental healthcare through your institution if you do not otherwise have access. Specific phobias are treatable. Formally ...


171

On the basis of the information you've given, I think you should look for a new supervisor as soon as possible. Regardless of whether you manage to adapt the focus of your work, your current supervisor does not sound like someone you want to work with. I couldn't get anyone to teach me at the time, so the whole experience was pretty traumatic No one ...


171

tonysdg asked in a comment Can you talk to the department head? Or even better, a university ombudsperson (aka a neutral 3rd party who can discuss your options with you)? and you replied I don't know - I'm studying in Germany and I can't speak German. While it might be a good idea to learn German, you most probably don't have to know German to ...


73

First, I'll assume that you don't and can't bypass the statement. The journal isn't going to go along with that. Second, while this may be an edge case, the line needs to be drawn somewhere and it has been decided that the line is drawn in the most conservative place so that you don't need to make judgements in every case. The reason for conservatism here ...


70

You are two years into a four-year PhD, or perhaps you have completed four years out of six. It may seem long, but it's still early in your academic career. It's not too late to quit and restart, and you might even be able to jumpstart into a new PhD position using the work you've already done. That might be your best option. Stop your current PhD. Not ...


41

(This answer supposed the OP is an American; which turns out to be true, but they are attending school in Canada, so while the general thrust of the answer remains valid some of the US-specific aspects are obviously not immediately relevant) Phobias can potentially fall under mental disabilities, which may then subsequently be covered and protected by the ...


40

This is a much bigger deal than you seem to think it is. What are the proper, canonical, professional way of handling this? You (or your research group) should seek to partner with someone with practical experience running experiments on human tissue, which does not have to be from your University. As long as you are running experiments on human tissue,...


39

Most journals now allow and even encourage the use of preprint servers. Some, however, still prohibit it on the notion that it is competition with their own publication of the article, or even consider it self-plagiarism. This tends to be field-dependent as well: some fields (e.g., physics, mathematics) are very liberal in policy, while others tend to be ...


32

It's not impossible, but in this day and age it is extremely rare for individuals unaffiliated with research institutions (academic or commercial) to successfully publish scientific research papers on their own (without research-institute affiliated co-authors) in good journals (bogus journals publish almost anything for a fee). The main reasons are that in ...


31

I realize that rational arguments do not help phobias. Dealing with a phobia will require therapy as suggested by the other answers. Sometimes understanding better the things you fear can help you cope with the fear. Sometimes not. If this is a case where understanding might help, you should realize that pretty much everything is a chemical (the only ...


28

I don't think there's any good way to include these papers on your CV. It's not conventional to list anyone else's papers on your CV, so by default everyone will assume you are one of the authors of each paper you list. If you aren't exceptionally clear, so clear that nobody could possibly misunderstand even if they are just skimming and not reading ...


26

I'm going to assume that this question is for real – that important research is being done, and live mice must be killed in order to conduct the research. (Sorry for that caveat, but there's something rather fishy about this question, especially in light of Emilie's comment. If the O.P. was a newer user, I'd guess we were being trolled.) Your question ends ...


23

Your results are not publishable. I think the others are beating around the bush too much. You didn't deal with procedures for handling human samples. You didn't document your consent, you didn't have any procedures for adverse findings. Could you even prove it was your blood? Your IRB will not approve you retroactively, a) because they don't do that ...


22

Very politely notify them your scholarship and RA position (or whatever it is called that requires you to do work in return for money) has ended, and offer a consulting rate to continue. Make sure there's an agreed-upon number of hours for each task, so they aren't thinking they can give you one hour of work at a time, when the emails alone take longer than ...


18

This isn't an answer for everyone in this situation, but it seems very much an answer for you. As you present it, you have skills in bioinformatics and don't like wetlab work (my wife is a vegetarian who had to do lots of work with mice during her PhD, so I very much understand the view). These two facts alone seem to present a reasonable solution. Having ...


17

There are quite a few journals where you can publish theoretical work in this area. Here are a few suggestions (the distinction is based on my perception and knowledge of what they've published, I'll let others chip in if they disagree): For more theoretical work: The IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (TCBB). The Journal of ...


17

From what you've said this sounds like a honest mistake made in good faith, and if I was your supervisor I'd accept your apology and move on. At your stage it's to be expected that you're still learning some of the norms of the culture, and they're not always clear. That said, I do get particular about authorship. Let me tell you a story from my previous ...


17

Talk to your professor As the other answers have said, professional help is important for your overall quality of life. But it's also a long term solution, and you also have to deal with your labs this semester. Talk to your professor about how you can be successful in your current labs while you seek professional help. Be prepared for your professor ...


17

I can think of one (possibly) entirely ethical way to bypass the more onerous demands of the bioethics committee: don't use human blood. You are working on microscope imagery, rather than immunology or any other functional issue, so any blood cell of approximately the right size ought to be acceptable. I would try contacting a local vet to see about ...


16

Some important things to know: 1) Many professors receive dozens of unsolicited emails a day from potential graduate students, and essentially ignore them because they can't keep up (although having a form letter "no more students!" response is, perhaps, a nicer thing to do). 2) Many (most) faculty don't admit students without having some idea of how they ...


15

I'm not sure about a Thesis, since there you need to have the backing of an Academic Institution as far as I am aware. But as far as a research paper is concerned, you could get the support you need from within any organisation which invests a decent amount of resources in Research and Development. Organisations such as Microsoft in IT publish papers under ...


15

First of all, you should look for professional help. If this phobia affects your life, and it sounds like it does, you should try to work on it. For most phobias, there are very good behaviour therapy approaches available which help you dealing with your phobia. Please look for a therapist! One practical thing you can do is writing an e-mail to the course ...


11

Asking whether a contribution merits acknowledgement or co-authorship is always appropriate, as long as it is done in a professional and non-confrontational way. The answer may be "no," but it's certainly worthwhile to ask. (And if the answer is "no," at least you have learned something about standards for authorship and acknowledgement in your lab/field.)


11

Crediting yourself for a published work for which your name appears nowhere creates a verifiability problem: how can the interested reader of your CV confirm that you did what you wrote you did? I also think that putting this work on your CV could create an awkward dissonance between your claim that the work that you did was significant and the lack of ...


10

As a person who faced a similar dilemma a few years ago, I think there are major practical differences: The working environment. Every doctor will spend his early career in a hospital, whether he plans on practising in the community later or not. A hospital environment is really different than the research one. In the former you are constantly on your feet, ...


10

You've published the results in a prestigious journal. In most of those journals, that means you've promised to make those mice available to other researchers. For example, Nature says An inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build upon the authors' published claims. A condition of publication in a Nature ...


10

First of all, let me tell you that I'm sorry this happened to you. Animal experiments are a necessary evil, but this is not the way to go about them. And when you are so desperate as it comes across from your question, remember: your first duty is to yourself. Not to your PI, and not even to your PhD project. Before you look for any other solution, take a ...


10

My opinion has always been that once I sign my name on something (like a paper, or a poster), I endorse it to the extent that it can be presented, submitted, or used for any other standard purpose without any further approvals or permissions on my side. Essentially, publication (or presentation) constitutes putting your work into a public domain. Anybody, ...


10

It is possible for an IRB to make a determination that your research, though it involves humans, does not rise to the level of human use that would require a whole protocol. I've gone down this road when trying to do 'experiments' that involve students using a web interface and having their activities recorded. It takes a few months and costs several hundred ...


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